Productive Urban Landscapes

Research and practice around the CPUL design concept

Chicago’s Urban Agricultural Networks: Mapping the future of thriving metropolitan foodsheds (source: Gundula Proksch conference presentation 2020)

Editorial board selects proposals for inclusion in Mapping the Edible City book

During the last weeks, our eight-people-strong editorial board had the near-impossible task to select more than 20 thematically, geographically and disciplinarily balanced contributions for our forthcoming book Mapping the Edible City (working title). Our call earlier this Spring attracted more than 50 high-quality submissions from all over the world mainly focusing on either a specific urban location or on specific food mapping methodologies or, more generally, on the challenges and opportunities urban food mapping as sustainable development agendas. The researchers and practitioners represent a variety of disciplines, such as urban design, anthropology, geography, architecture, urban planning, community activism, spatial arts, fine arts, farming, agronomy, economy and photography, highlighting how multi-disciplinary urban food mapping already is.

The book project follows on from our conference panel Mapping the Edible City: Making visible communities and food in the city at last year’s Royal Anthropological Institute’s Anthropology and Geography: Dialogues Past, Present and Future conference. The conference panel was co-convened by Dr Ferne Edwards (Norwegian University of Science and Technology), Katrin Bohn and Prof Andre Viljoen (both University of Brighton), attracted a high number of submissions and resulted in the decision by participants to embark on a joint publication.
The book’s production is now overseen by Katrin, Ferne and Dr Mikey Tomkins (UK), and the editorial board also includes Mila Brill (University of Bonn, Germany), Dr Howard Lee (Hadlow Agricultural College, UK), Dr Gundula Proksch (University of Washington, USA) and Ivonne Weichold (University of Luxembourg).

The book will be split into four sections working-titled: System (Why), Land (Where), Process (When) and Action (Who). Seeking to combine both, artistic and academic styles, we aim to alternate between ‘text-based’ and ‘image-based’ chapters grouped into the 4 sections. Chapters will be of all kinds: from theoretical and conceptual through to practical applications of food mapping in cities.

 

For information on the past RAI/RGS conference see here.

For information on our co-editor Dr Mikey Tomkins see here.

For more information on the design and curation of this process see here.

Image: Chicago’s Urban Agricultural Networks: Mapping the future of thriving metropolitan foodsheds (source: Gundula Proksch conference presentation 2020)

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_ Mapping the Edible City* food mapping* urban designInternational

Katrin Bohn • 21st June 2021


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