DMSA Feature: Amanda Brooks

Before the official launch of our Master’s programme and a much needed holiday break we talk to our recent graduate Amanda Brooks who presented a very ambitious experiment in immersive and 3D sound titled ‘SINKHOLE’. We hope to be able to present Amanda’s project again in the coming year! Stay Tuned and read below to learn more about her.

DMSA: Three important words that represent you as a creative person

AB:Progressive, Classical, Spooky

DMSA: When did you start working with sound and music?

AB: Live bands since 1984, sound phenomena since 2009 after my guitarist/sound guy had a stroke and there was no-one else who wanted to engineer the bands sound. I took the job on.

DMSA: In what ways has the DMSA course supported or helped you to develop into who you are today creatively and professionally?

AB: The DMSA course has inspired me to compose differently, it has helped me to develop technically which is one huge reason why I applied for the DMSA B.A and to understand the concept of sound art on a deeper level.

DMSA: Can you tell us a bit more about ‘SINKHOLE’, the piece you presented in our degree show this year?

AB: My final degree project ‘Sinkhole’ is about travelling sound lines, vertically, horizontally, and diagonally engulfing and surrounding the listener on a large scale (5 meters high sound cylinder) Inspired by Austrian architect and sound artist Bernhard Leitner. The concept derives from modern life as a human being where everything seems to be a race against time. ‘Sinkhole’ represents standing in a insurmountable sink under a giant tap where the listener hears pipes creaking and swelling, then the inevitable ‘water’ comes as sound, crashing vertically onto and around the listener. It is sonically big as well.

DMSA:You have been performing in quite a lot of bands. Any gigs coming up?

AB: I don’t have any gigs right now as I ‘walked’ from my two bands, ‘Undercover Agents’ and 20+ year old ‘Soul x Press’, I felt stuck and stagnated. Personally, from time to time, I do feel the need to maintain my place in the ‘un-comfort zone’ so I started a new project ‘Ditch the Demon’ where the music and band members are a little more ambitious.

DMSA: Other plans for the future? projects, events, visions?

AB: The future: I have applied for the DMSA M.A. which I am very excited about, I feel I need to continue my journey into all the aspects of sound phenomena in the field of sound art and design. I have a vision to gig, compose, freelance as a sound artist/designer and a session vocalist. I may even become an acoustician as well and sort out some live music venues !!

Ithaca Prize Winners

To mark the course’s longstading partnership with Chris Evans-Robert’s (DMSA Alumni, 2007) ITHACA Studio, Chris and DMSA have created a new award, launched on this year’s graduate show. Known for its cutting edge audio and light installations, ITHACA Studio and the ITHACA Prize want to celebrate innovative creative work by our students.

This year’s winners were Jedd Winterburn’s breath-taking Zenith and Olivia Louvel’s (Runner Up Prize) intense and through-provoking The Whole Inside.

You can watch excerpts from both pieces in the videos below.

Warning: The video contains strong language.

‘The Whole Inside’ by Olivia Louvel – generative sound mural from Cat Werk Imprint on Vimeo.

DMSA Degree Show 2019 | Attentive Environments

1-9 June | DMSA Facilities| Grand Parade, University of Brighton
The private view is on the 31st of May and starts at 4pm. Last Entry – 9.30pm
Weekday opening times are from 10am until 5pm, and weekends from 12pm until 5pm.
FB Event

We are honoured to be presenting to you the works by our third year students consisting of an eclectic mix of sound and musical compositions, live AV performances, experimental films, sound murals, generative art and installation pieces. Spanning across this wide range of practices and processes, all the works are supported by an underlying thread of challenging our perceptions and engaging us in a more attentive process of listening, feeling and experiencing.

This year we are happy to nominate four of our student pieces for the Nagoya Award and the newly launched Ithaca Awards. An * will be added next to the nominated pieces.

Good luck to all our students and congrats on their hard work!

Detailed schedule to follow.

AD Design: Jedd Winterburn


::Works on Display::

Thom Aurelius – MAX (Animation) | SS1

MAX is a short, animated film that depicts a story of a young boy, Max, who is experiencing the struggles of fitting in socially at high school. The project itself is a collaboration between two creative artists, Thomas Aurelius (producer, composer and sound designer) and Peter Golijanin (animator).

The animation’s main intention is to use the power of punk-inspired musical motifs and naturalistic sound-design to represent the feelings of Max as a character and the world that he is living in. This results in the audience relating themselves to the character of Max and his onscreen experiences.

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Sonny Bacon Sonny Bacon – Lost In Process ( Experimental Film) | SS1

Lost in Process is an audiovisual experiment intended for large screen projection. The film explores sound’s ability to evoke, shift and steer atmospheres in combination with visual material. The audio of the piece was created using a variety of elements, featuring self-captured field recordings, foley and manipulated instrumental compositions.

The visual material was created through the recording and arrangement of still and moving image content captured using an array of visual technologies; DV Tape, 35mm and 16mm film. Themes of destruction, time and surveillance are presented as the experimental film unfolds.

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Danny Baron – A Call To Perish (Immersive Radio Play) | SDL

A Call to Perish is an immersive radio play, which explores a fictional settlement that takes a turn for the worst. The play travels through different areas of the settlement, highlighting its diverse and unique soundscape, executed through diffused sound. The main concept behind this project is to use sound to create an observable story for the listener without any visuals or, in other words, the internal cinema. This project is to be exhibited in a 5.1 surround sound setup, optimising the realism and making it as engaging as possible for the listener.

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Amanda Brooks – Sinkhole (Sound Installation) | Performance Studio

Sinkhole is a multi-channel sound art installation exploring themes of descent and life’s daunting threat of ‘going under’.

Using processed field recordings taken in various railway transport systems, the piece extensively uses audio relocation and movement, with sound panning between multiple speakers in an immersive cylindrical formation. The audio of the piece is manifested as a heavy volume of ‘water’ dropping onto the listener, creating a feeling of standing in an insurmountable sink under a giant tap. The sound then takes on different directions, engulfing the listener horizontally, vertically and diagonally.

The digital audio workstation Logic Pro X audio was used, alongside a fundamental production system with IRCAM plugin software. T.R.A.X Voice Transformer v.3 was utilised for sound processing with S.P.A.T Revolution controlling the vertical, horizontal and diagonal movement of the audio.

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Duncan Cabral – Digital Forest (Surround Sound Composition) | SDL

Digital Forest is a surround sound composition that utilises environmental sounds to create a sonic space. Examining concepts of audio exploration and immersion, Digital Forest looks at sound’s potential to transport a listener to another place. Sound design, soundscape building, and surround sound mixing are all used within this work. The digital audio workstation Logic Pro X was used extensively, with plugins such as Serum, ES2, ESE being utilised alongside hardware synthesisers such as the Korg Monologue, Microbrute and Yamaha CS.

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James Carroll – London Atmospheres (Experimental Film) | SDL

London Atmospheres aims to utilise soundscapes and visuals in order to capture the urban atmosphere found in various locations of London. Exploring the relationship between sound and image in film, London Atmospheres focuses on how atmosphere and tension is created. The footage of this piece was shot in central London at night in order to relay the intended atmosphere, with field recordings of the various London locations also being taken.

The soundtrack London Atmospheres uses musicality alongside environmental sounds in order to create an immersive piece, with a sense of underlying suspense in order to capture the listeners attention. A variety of software was used in the recording and editing processes, such as Adobe Premiere Pro CC, FL studio 12 and Logic Pro X.

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Jack Cleary – FLUCTUS (AV Performance) | Performance Studio

Fluctus, which is Latin for waves, explores the concept of brightness in sound and visuals.

The work synthesisers the ideas of musical “Brightness, Flux and Logos” presented by philosopher Heraclitus, which attempt to describe how the universe works.

Brightness is a sonic quality determined by the number of harmonics, the more harmonics the brighter the sound. Flux is fluidity whilst Logos is structure, generating the tension necessary for the string to vibrate to create sound.

Inspired by classical Indian and ambient music, the performance is produced using Ableton and a collection of electronic instruments. The visuals, created in Touch Designer, are vibrating lines organised into a spherical shape while the timbre of sound informs the colour of the visuals through interaction with an OSC controller.

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Nile Ezra – Nightshift (Musical Composition) | SS1

Nightshift is a series of three atmospheric instrumental tracks, which explore themes of darkness, inspired by science fiction and horror films such as Interstellar and The Shining. Using the digital audio workstation Ableton, various sound design techniques such as sampling, granular synthesis and Foley have been implemented to create varying aspects of sounds reminiscent of nightfall.

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Daniel Fadil – Erosion (Short Film) | SS1

Erosion explores the physical forces at the coast as a metaphor for Britain’s erosive nature towards languages from other shores, with the sounds of the physical washing out eternally those of a minority culture. In this case, the examined language is Romany, or rather, the remnants of it familiar to the artist. Even in its distanced existence from British influence, it has still been diminished to the point of no longer being a language. A narrative based on isolation and foreignness is used to play out the history of this phenomenon.

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Tarek El Goraicy – Singularity (AV Performance) | Performance Studio

Singularity is an audio-visual live performance of two songs from of my upcoming release Human Condition.

The presentation, containing elements of improvisation, consists of one laptop running an Ableton Live set, which is navigated through the use of a MIDI controller. Live synthesizers and live vocals are utilised, with a second machine also generating realtime visual projections through the use Touchdesigner and a MIDI-interface.

The performance aims to present a coherent interactive relationship between sound and visuals in the context of an immersive live performance, countering the traditional DJ/laptop-performance of electronic music.

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Brianna Leeds – The Safe Space (AV Installation) | SDL

The Safe Space uses a quadraphonic audio set up to combine meditative tones and abstract art, forming an encompassing environment of mindfulness and peace. This project integrates research from the field of colour therapy, music therapy and spiritual influences. In the safe space the audience can gradually disengage from personal symptoms of anxiety or stress by experiencing the serene audiovisual display in their own time.

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Olivia Louvel – The Whole Inside (Generative AV Installation) | SDL * ITHACA AWARD NOMINEE

Guidance: this work contains sensitive content.

The Whole Inside is a generative sound mural combining artificial and human voices, expanding the plastic dimension of voice on contouring the body.
The work confronts femininity and abuse, when the body is being depersonalised, subsequently dissociated as a defence mechanism to cope with a traumatic event.
The harrowing polyphonic vocal composition is based on a text sourced from the Incels (involuntary celibates) forum. On debating how to murder a woman, some members of the Incels community propose diverse actions, one being to rape her then to “take a surgical knife, cut open her abdominal area and remove the organs”.

Since October 2018, the site incels.me has been suspended due to the content that violated the domain’s anti-abuse policy. Applying principle of conditional logic, the randomised audio is carrying on indefinitely, revealing itself to the experiencer over time.

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Jamie Moore – The Lily Pond (AV Installation) | Performance Studio *NAGOYA AWARD NOMINEE

Consisting of three large projector screens and 6.1 channel surround sound, The Lily Pond is inspired by Monet’s Water Lilies series (1914 – 1926), in a modernisation of their concepts. The work runs for a total length of 1 hour 40 minutes, creating a slow moving and enveloping spectacle on a grand scale, which cannot be interpreted in the same way from any viewpoint or temporal instance.

It uses field recordings and video taken at Monet’s garden in Giverny, as well as images taken of his paintings at Musée de l’Orangerie in Paris, re-imagining the works and expanding them into a multi-sensory environment, within a contemporary context.

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Joseph Purefoy – Sampling the World (Musical Composition) | SS1 – 229

Sampling the world is a five track EP exploring the art of sampling in an attempt to demonstrate the vast possibilities found in manipulating and repurposing a sound. The work was produced with the digital audio workstation Logic Pro and focuses on expanding audio from its original context, shifting sound to a new sonic dimension.

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Dominic Rae – Fits the Frame | SS1 – 229


Fits in The Frame is an experimental folk-inspired concept EP. Informed by themes of narrative, Americana, analogue photography and folk music, it aims to explore the gap between the continuous, uninterrupted flow of time and people’s tendency towards quantizing the idea of time into discrete, separate moments and sections.

A key facet of the EP is the consideration of ‘Morii’, the desire to capture a fleeting moment, which brings together the ideas of music, photography and storytelling by each component’s intrinsic nature: music as continuum, photography as instantiative capture, and storytelling as a bridge between the two.

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Luke Vosper – My Bedroom (AV Performance) | Performance Studio

Stemming from a desire for a more natural and immersive way of composing and performing electronic music, My Bedroom is a studio and live setup that focusses on DIY and self-built hardware and instruments. Drawing inspiration from a space used for composition, performance, and instrument construction, My Bedroom explores an improvisation-based approach to electronic music.

As well as analogue and acoustic instruments, My Bedroom takes full advantage of digital tools. Using custom software and patches alongside complex synthesis techniques and an extensive sample library, this allows the music of the piece to be created in an improvisation-driven, performative way.

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Matt Were – Piano I Ching (Prepared Piano / Interactive AV Installation) | 229 *ITHACA AWARD NOMINEE

Piano I Ching is an interactive audiovisual piece. The audio from the installation starts when a webcam picks up movement within close proximity to the piano. This results in solenoids and motors being triggered, brushing, scraping and hitting the piano, giving a familiar object a completely new vocabulary of sounds.

Each casting yields two trigrams (a hexagram), and each of the trigrams is associated with a sound sequence relevant to the time of the year. This piece attempts to create a synthesis of a Western cultural icon, the piano, with an Eastern cultural icon, the I Ching, by interpreting the latter divinations through sound on a prepared piano.

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Jedd Winterburn – Zenith (AV Composition for multiple screens) | Performance Studio *ITHACA AWARD NOMINEE

Zenith is an audiovisual installation that incubates the practise of attentive listening, inviting the listener to discover an awareness of sound that can enrich one’s life after the event. The unique viewing experience of Zenith is notably engaging, operating over two screens and 4.1 surround sound in a highly curated environment. Hosting a palette of noise curated to explore the fringes of musicality, Zenith aims to promote the abstraction of sound’s form and function.

DMSA Feature: Aki Purser

This month we talk to Aki Purser. Aki has just graduated from our course and her astonishing audio-visual piece 記憶 (Memory) has won her the ‘Incentive award’ from our partner University in Nagoya Japan. Aki has a few exciting projects ahead, including RBMA Berlin this coming September.

DMSA: Three important words that represent you as a creative person
AP: playful, meticulous, intricate

DMSA: When did you start working with sound and music?
AP:Aged 6/7 playing the piano

DMSA: In what ways has the DMSA course supported or helped you to develop into who you are today creatively and professionally?
AP: It broadened my approach to sound and encouraged me to explore past the rigid rules of traditional music.
Over my three years there, the teachers were very supportive and I am incredibly grateful.

DMSA: Your degree piece 記憶 (Memory) has won one of the Nagoya awards this year. Can you tell us a bit about the project?
AP: 記憶 (Memory) is an audio-visual piece that explores the fragmented structures of human memory. Developed around the poem 記憶 (Memory) by Tian Yuan and taking inspiration from Phillip Larkins’ An Arundel Tomb, the piece examines the expiration of memory and its inability to withstand interference. The 4 minute film consists of rapidly fluctuating rhythms, upon which runs a continuous stream of black and white imagery. The broken rhythms are used to portray the fractured nature of memory and this is emphasised through sequences of still photography that have been adapted for the moving image.

DMSA: You will be attending the RBMA in Berlin in September, this is exciting! Was it difficult to get in and what do you hope to get from it?
AP: Honestly I don’t know how I got in. I had been told about it and sent off an application last minute on a whim. I really did not expect anything from it and it was a wonderful surprise. I am trying to approach it with no expectations and am generally trying not to think about it too much, but I am really looking forward to it and feel very privileged to have been offered such an opportunity.

DMSA: Other plans for the future? projects, events, visions?
AP: We’ll have to see! My first love is sound for film, so hopefully I will find myself going down that route in the near future.

Exploring Boundaries: A DMSA Graduate Show Special Part 3 | Sound, moving image and interactivity

All the pieces precented in the Pt1 and Pt 2 are placing sound in relation to enviroments and particular issues using other media and advanced technologies to challenge the audience. In this last part we would like to present works that continue experimenting with media and technologies but have a more firm focus on moving image or interactivity. Sound for moving image is one of the profile areas in our course. Many of our graduate students have produced outstanding work for film and moving image, crafting their skills on both sound and video editing, film scoring, foley or storyboarding and production and launching successful freelance careers in the sector. This year, we have some exceptional graduate pieces exploring the boundaries between sound, film, performance, and installation.

Aki Purser’s 記憶 (Memory) is an audio-visual piece that explores the fragmented structures of human memory. Developed around the poem 記憶 (Memory) by Tian Yuan and taking inspiration from Phillip Larkins’ An Arundel Tomb, the piece examines the expiration of memory and its inability to withstand interference. The 5 minute film consists of rapidly fluctuating rhythms, upon which runs a continuous stream of black and white imagery. The broken rhythms are used to portray the fractured nature of memory and this is emphasised through sequences of still photography that have been adapted for the moving image.

Jordan Lewis’ The Nova Gathering is a multi-media art piece exploring the use of media in our ‘post-truth’ society. Using the structure of a new religious movement, The Nova Gathering, this piece takes visual, audio and performance elements to play on the idea of what truth really is. The Nova Gathering is primarily a satirical take on the way “facts” can be presented today, where the focus is more on the production and entertainment values, rather that the validity of the content. These thoughts led Lewis to consider how well he could replicate this kind of process in the fabrication of a fake organisation and its credibility.

Bobbie Cook’s The Hard Shoulder is an animated short film pulling influences from the 70s-90s in both animation style, technique and sound design aiming to create something faithfully nostalgic but also current and fresh. The story is about a Bonnie and Clyde type of relationship between a widower and his daughter travelling to find a man he believes can return his wife to him. The pieces has an upbeat mood driven by a kind of psychedelic mix of funk, jazzy influences and more recent flavours of hip hop. The animation style is inspired by Late 80s-early 90s Anime with the illustration and design in the style of artists like Eizin Suzuki and Hiroshi Nagai

Alvaro Villar Castillo reverse engineers the film industry’s visual storyboards to propose a method of sonic storyboarding. SONORAMA is a project that involves the creation of a cinematic album, both orchestral and synthesised composition for imaginary film situations. The installation aims to represent possible cinematic situations as leitmotifs for certain characters, imaginary scenarios and atmospheres for a film. It is presented to the public as a surround 5.1 installation. Speakers surround the audience sitting down in an illuminated bench in a dark room. The installation’s sonic content was inspired and based on already existing comics and storyboards, as if they were the screenplay of a real film. Each individual composition represents different a cinematic genre (ex. Sci-fi, Horror, Action) and scene (ex. Chasing…) All sounds were recorded and created with synthesisers and/or samplers for this specific installation.

Oskar Jeff’s Reconstructing Tapes is an audio-visual installation comprising of four VCRs, four corresponding televisions and a pair of speakers. A composition built entirely from VHS samples is split into two and transfer back to VHS tape. The two tapes play simultaneously, performing the full composition. The side televisions play looping static, expanding the space and drawing the audience inward. The tapes are deconstructed, reconstructed and finally deconstructed again within the space. The work is a reflection on the history of sampling practice, and explores how samples can be disconnected from their sources and used as raw creative material.

The idea of listening as a participatory activity is central to all the pieces presented. The pieces presented above present experimental approaches into film sound where the viewer/listener plays an important role in completing the work. The last two pieces presented in this post are expanding further the idea of interactivity. Jack Lister’s Flood the Box is a generative instrument that explores the use of water as an input medium for generative music. Combining both acoustic sound objects and in-the-box virtual instruments, Flood the Box aims to free the computer musician from the shackles of working to the metric grid. The audience is transported in their mind to their favourite body of water; whether that’s an ocean, a harbour, a lake or a diddy pond with the aim to feel that same peaceful and tranquil feeling that being near a calm body of water can bring.

Edward Scott’s Lissajous Sounds is an interactive sound installation comprising of a pendulum hung from the ceiling which, when spinning, creates a diffusion of sound that mirrors the movement of the pendulum through speakers that are set up in a circle around it. The pattern-like movement of the pendulum- and all pendulums- are called ‘Lissajous curves’, named after Joules-Antoine Lissajous, the physicist who studied them in 1857. When the pendulum ultimately comes to a halt, the sound stops; this reflects the phenomenon of sound as a moving body in space, happening as a process in time.

PROGRAMME

Performance Studio:

Private view: 1st June
Aki Purser / Jeph Vanger (1800 changeover)

2nd – 3rd June:
Jeph Vanger // Sφera

4th June:
DMSA Day / Alvaro Villar-Castillo // SONORAMA

5th June:
Alvaro Villar-Castillo // SONORAMA

6th – 8th June:
JORDAN LEWIS // THE N0VA GATHERING

9th – 10th June
Aki Purser // 記憶 (MEMORY)

Sound Diffusion Lab:

1st – 3rd June:
Oli Johns // The Miraculous Land – Library

4th – 5th June:
Edward Scott // Lissajous Sounds
PJ Davy // Heads in The Cloud

6th June:
Liam Eshgi-Luck // The Cacophonic Hospital

7th – 8th June:
Edward Scott // Lissajous Sounds

8th – 10th June:
PJ Davy // Heads in The Cloud

Ongoing Installations
Room 229
Oskar Jeff // Reconstructing Tapes
Sophie Kiarie // Soul
Liam Eshgi-Luck // The Cacophonic Hospital
Michael McKeown // Aquarium Music
Bobbie Cook // Hard Shoulder

Room 228
Jasmyn Bloch // FEMPORIS

The Shower room
Ivan Arbiol Camps // The Return of the Unwanted

Sound Diffusion Lab Foyer
Jack Lister // Flood the Box

Exploring Boundaries: A DMSA Graduate Show Special Part 2 | Ruminations in Sound

The DMSA Graduate show has been offering to audiences a mix of engaging, thought provoking and aesthetically diverse experiences. Works from our students have received prestigious awards for their outstanding quality. The Graduate Show is also a chance for our students to curate, coordinate, build and promote their show, to work as a team and show the world that they are ready to enter a competitive and difficult field. Moving beyond the traditional career paths often associated with digital music production and sound arts, our students engage with the social aspects of sound and how sound can prompt us to thing of wider issues and questions.

Have you ever wondered what the sound of The Cloud is? What is our place within the digital divide, what happens to our voices when uploaded to the cloud? PJ Davy’s Heads in the Cloud is a 13.1 multi-channel, sound and light installation concerning the digitisation of our lives through the internet. Recordings of social media, blog, and website posts, vocalised by the original, online-authors, move throughout the installation; transforming into intense, digital noise as they navigate through a central, audio-visual matrix. Caged LED lights and a central 360° loudspeaker act as a physical manifestation of the internet, presenting an audible, visual focal point for the encounterer. Heads in The Cloud presents a physical, human experience to reflect on our relationship with technology and each other, in an increasingly digitised world.

Ivan Arbiol Camp’s The Return of the Forgotten is a generative sculpture of refused electronics arising from a rejection to claim a space in modern society. Sounds come from the interaction between functional and dysfunctional devices interfering with each other as a form of conversation between necessity and ecology. The piece asks the question about the use and abuse of technology and the impact of these habits on the environment.

Liam Eshghi-Luck’s The Cacophonic Hospital is an Audio-Visual composition containing imagery and sound from different spaces within hospitals throughout London, Surrey and the South-west of England. Outside of just field recording the piece incorporates foley work from research of patient and staff experiences whilst also utilising a custom software made within Max/Msp, that determines the output of alarm sound throughout the latter of this composition. The aim of this composition is to embark the audience on a journey across hospitals throughout England, in the more densely populated and the not so populated Hospitals. The idea being that noise in the hospital persists whether busy or not, and much can be done to change health care design sonically for the sake of patient and staff satisfactory.

Chrstopher Brindle’s Dying Imperfections uses a custom made low power radio transmitter tool kit to create a series of site-specific radio graffitis recorded onto cassette tape. The piece explores the imperfections in how we capture sound and the effects on our perception of the sound when the flaws in the mediums are pushed to extremes. These circuit elements in the toolkit change and mutate the sound as it iterates through the circuit multiple times, with the tape loop echo, the sounds changing pitch and levels of distortion ultimately removing familiar sounds from the context we know them, in and creating new sonic landscapes.

Jasmyn Bloch’s Femporis is an exploration into the concepts of rebirth and new life; considering the constant state of flux and growth we experience throughout our lives. It is a consideration of the notion that something peaceful can then turn traumatic, to then become something new, like birth but also like life. The ebb and flow of ups and downs, yet one cannot exist without the other. The piece prompts the audience to feel as though they have just experienced a ‘change’; a shift in thought or person; to think more about the deeper roots within themselves, and remind them of the constant changes and ‘births’ they have experienced throughout their lives, whether they are small or considerable changes.

Michael McKeown’s Aquarium Music is an electroacoustic installation that has taken place in the Brighton Sea Life Centre in May 2018. The installation featured six pieces composed entirely of naturally sourced sounds that reflect the sonic environments of the marine life in the aquarium. Some of the sounds within the compositions were manipulated by the movement within certain enclosures, making the audio content unique to each section of the centre.Aquarium Music‘s immersive soundscape sets up a process for educating the audience and of creating a more authentic and appropriate sonic environment.The piece on display in Room 229 in Grand Parade brings the six compositions in one small room, blending them together as one environment, re-constructing the atmosphere of the aquarium for the listener.

PROGRAMME

Performance Studio:

Private view: 1st June
Aki Purser / Jeph Vanger (1800 changeover)

2nd – 3rd June:
Jeph Vanger // Sφera

4th June:
DMSA Day / Alvaro Villar-Castillo // SONORAMA

5th June:
Alvaro Villar-Castillo // SONORAMA

6th – 8th June:
JORDAN LEWIS // THE N0VA GATHERING

9th – 10th June
Aki Purser // 記憶 (MEMORY)

Sound Diffusion Lab:

1st – 3rd June:
Oli Johns // The Miraculous Land – Library

4th – 5th June:
Edward Scott // Lissajous Sounds
PJ Davy // Heads in The Cloud

6th June:
Liam Eshgi-Luck // The Cacophonic Hospital

7th – 8th June:
Edward Scott // Lissajous Sounds

8th – 10th June:
PJ Davy // Heads in The Cloud

Ongoing Installations
Room 229
Oskar Jeff // Reconstructing Tapes
Sophie Kiarie // Soul
Liam Eshgi-Luck // The Cacophonic Hospital
Michael McKeown // Aquarium Music
Bobbie Cook // Hard Shoulder

Room 228
Jasmyn Bloch // FEMPORIS

The Shower room
Ivan Arbiol Camps // The Return of the Unwanted

Sound Diffusion Lab Foyer
Jack Lister // Flood the Box

Exploring Boundaries: A DMSA Graduate Show Special Part 1 | SoundSpaces

Sound is a medium that invites participation, reflection, action and reaction. Sound operates across boundaries of senses, media, materials and forms. This year’s graduate show pieces from our students present a range of approaches into these observations. With an emphasis on both the physical-visceral and the emotional-ethereal affect of sound, the different works exhibited in the DMSA area in Grand Parade (East Wing, Back Building across the courtyard, 3rd Floor) pose a series of complex questions that the visitors will play a leading role into deciphering.


Jeph Vanger’s Sφera is the result of a one year field research in Berlin, Klingenberg Am Main, Athens with people such as Hans Peter Kuhn & Markus Klug. Sφera is a multichannel sonic environment where the physical presence of sound and the ongoing engagement become the priority. The symphony of (1) a hand-built subwoofer, (2) an also hand-built multicell horn speaker and (3) the 3D audio speaker IKO are creating a sonic “atmo-sphere” where the encounterer is able to experience sound in its spherical existence. The piece pays tribute to the mournful sound of the Foghorn, using original recordings from the Foghorn Requiem (2013) field performance in which more than 50 ships gathered on the North Sea (UK) to perform an ambitious musical score. Using walls, floors, human bodies as tools of a spatial orchestration, the sound surrounds the listener and enables him or her to be a fundamental part of the installation. Borrowing a few words from Dr Kersten Glandien: “What it can mean to be an empowered active encounterer rather than a passive overwhelmed consumer?”

A peformance of Sφera is scheduled for the Private View, June 1st at 7pm. Book your tickets.

SΦΕRA from Jeph Vanger Sound on Vimeo.

Sound is enveloping and ambiguous, simultaneously of the body and beyond it; a trigger of memories, senses and sensations. Sophie Kiairie’s Soul positions the listener in complete blackness-blindfolded with their ears as the only means to navigate through a binaural soundspace of familiar-like creatures and environments. Soul is a short first-person immersive audio play. In Soul, you are placed in the shoes of a soldier undergoing training in a facility in order to gain heightened hearing senses that in turn help you the soldier in combat against unknown creatures that have invaded the planet, eating people’s souls. They do so to strengthen themselves, and to feed their Queen, who is to give birth to a King strong enough to conquer the universe. It starts at the end of the training in a facility, where scientists have placed you in a training room where they proceed to load 4 different sonically simulated environments to explore.

Oliver John’s The Miraculous Land is a 40 channel generative, ambisonics inspired sound installation. For the majority of its everlasting duration it sonically comprises of an electroacoustic sound design driven construction of a room in a library. At points the illusion of the library intentionally deconstructs itself, separating sounds from their sources and manipulating them to create intangible realities. This makes each of the 40 loudspeakers individually decipherable, creating surreal illusions of movement within the three dimensional soundspace. Because of this, one becomes attentive of its artificial creation, which puts light on the constructed sonic environment as a digital soundscape.

PROGRAMME

Performance Studio:

Private view: 1st June
Aki Purser / Jeph Vanger (1800 changeover)

2nd – 3rd June:
Jeph Vanger // Sφera

4th June:
DMSA Day / Alvaro Villar-Castillo // SONORAMA

5th June:
Alvaro Villar-Castillo // SONORAMA

6th – 8th June:
JORDAN LEWIS // THE N0VA GATHERING

9th – 10th June
Aki Purser // 記憶 (MEMORY)

Sound Diffusion Lab:

1st – 3rd June:
Oli Johns // The Miraculous Land – Library

4th – 5th June:
Edward Scott // Lissajous Sounds
PJ Davy // Heads in The Cloud

6th June:
Liam Eshgi-Luck // The Cacophonic Hospital

7th – 8th June:
Edward Scott // Lissajous Sounds

8th – 10th June:
PJ Davy // Heads in The Cloud

Ongoing Installations
Room 229
Oskar Jeff // Reconstructing Tapes
Sophie Kiarie // Soul
Liam Eshgi-Luck // The Cacophonic Hospital
Michael McKeown // Aquarium Music
Bobbie Cook // Hard Shoulder

Room 228
Jasmyn Bloch // FEMPORIS

The Shower room
Ivan Arbiol Camps // The Return of the Unwanted

Sound Diffusion Lab Foyer
Jack Lister // Flood the Box

DMSA Show featuring Robin Rimbaud (aka Scanner)

On June 4th members of the audience and students will have the chance to experience a unique mix of works from our first and second year students as well as the degree pieces on display by our third year students. Expect an eclectic selection of innovative multichannel digital music compositions, interactive installations, audiovisual pieces and films, radio art experiements, custom instruments and generative pieces.

In the occasion of the DMSA show we will also have the honour to have internationally acclaimed artist and composer Robin Rimbaud (aka Scanner).
Scanner traverses the experimental terrain between sound and space connecting a bewilderingly diverse array of genres. Since 1991 he has been intensely active in sonic art, producing concerts, installations and recordings, the albums Mass Observation (1994), Delivery (1997), and The Garden is Full of Metal (1998) hailed by critics as innovative and inspirational works of contemporary electronic music.

He scored the hit musical comedy Kirikou & Karaba (2007) and Narnia ballet (2015) based on the popular children’s book, Philips Wake-Up Light (2009), the re-opening of the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam in 2012 and in 2016 installed his Water Drops sound work in Rijeka Airport in Croatia.

His work Salles des Departs is permanently installed in a working morgue in Paris whilst Vex House, the residential house he designed a permanent soundtrack with Chance de Silva architects, was finished to critical acclaim in 2017.

Committed to working with cutting edge practitioners he collaborated with Bryan Ferry, Wayne MacGregor, Mike Kelley, Torres, Michael Nyman, Steve McQueen, Laurie Anderson and Hussein Chalayan, amongst many others.

DMSA Show is happening on the 4th of June, 12-6pm, Performance Studio, GP.
DMSA Show is curated by DMSA Alumni Maja Mihalik.

DMSA Feature: Jasmyn Bloch (Y3 Student)

This month’s feature welcomes third year student Jasmyn Bloch, a classiclally trained singer with an electronic music twist who through her explorations in our course developed new and engaging pathways of addressing issues such as voice, embodiment, femininity and the emotional affect of sound and music. Her upcoming multimedia installation entitled ‘FEMPORIS’ will be exhibited at this year’s degree show.

DMSA: Three important words that represent you as a creative person
JB: Feminine, intimate, emotional 

DMSA: When did you start working with sound and music?
JB: I started working with sound at a very young age, experimenting with all sorts of different instruments, but nothing really stuck. My true musical beginnings started when I found my passion for Classical Singing; this was the portal through which I found what sound, and especially voice, meant to me and what it could communicate to others. I remember being gob smacked the first time I sang in front of an audience, because by the end of my performance a lot of the audience were crying. I always knew music effected my emotions deeply, but to see others react so vividly to something I had sung was a turning point, I knew then I had to work with my voice and my emotions.

DMSA: In what ways has the DMSA course supported or help you to develop into who you are today creatively and professionally?
JB: The DMSA course opened my eyes to a lot of experimental, more artistic ways of approaching music. Before this course I was well versed in more mainstream electronic music, but had no idea of the plethora of ways music and sound can be used, creatively and powerfully, to evoke emotions and create statements. During my time here I believe I have created projects that I will continue to work on well past my graduation, but also planted seeds of ideas for my future work and concepts.

DMSA: What are your plans for the near future? projects, events, visions
JB: I am currently working on a multimedia sound installation called Femporis, which is a conceptual womb piece that will be a part of the Brighton University Degree Show this June. This piece is an exploration into the soundscape of the womb, but also considers the concepts of safety, nurturing and rebirth. I hope to continue down this vein of feminine works and create a trilogy of pieces that are focused on the female body and voice. Post University I plan to create a platform for young female artists in Brighton, a website and bi-monthly exhibition space, where they can show their work and be a part of a supportive collective, showing female sound and artworks in a unified space. 

More info:
http://jasmynbloch.weebly.com/