Immateriality – sonic arts tour

Immateriality is a travelling sonic arts exhibition that is touring the UK July 30th until 7th August 2019. It has been curated by DMSA staff/alumni Joshua Legallienne and features the work of DMSA graduates Ecka Mordecai and Jordan Edge, alongside newly-commissioned pieces by international artists Ingrid Plum (DK) and Robert Stokowy (DE) and UK artists Ben Jeans Houghton, Daniel W J Mackenzie, and David Leslie Stearn. More information about the tour can be found here: https://www.facebook.com/events/664673170668278/

Immateriality sonic arts tour

DMSA Feature: Amanda Brooks

Before the official launch of our Master’s programme and a much needed holiday break we talk to our recent graduate Amanda Brooks who presented a very ambitious experiment in immersive and 3D sound titled ‘SINKHOLE’. We hope to be able to present Amanda’s project again in the coming year! Stay Tuned and read below to learn more about her.

DMSA: Three important words that represent you as a creative person

AB:Progressive, Classical, Spooky

DMSA: When did you start working with sound and music?

AB: Live bands since 1984, sound phenomena since 2009 after my guitarist/sound guy had a stroke and there was no-one else who wanted to engineer the bands sound. I took the job on.

DMSA: In what ways has the DMSA course supported or helped you to develop into who you are today creatively and professionally?

AB: The DMSA course has inspired me to compose differently, it has helped me to develop technically which is one huge reason why I applied for the DMSA B.A and to understand the concept of sound art on a deeper level.

DMSA: Can you tell us a bit more about ‘SINKHOLE’, the piece you presented in our degree show this year?

AB: My final degree project ‘Sinkhole’ is about travelling sound lines, vertically, horizontally, and diagonally engulfing and surrounding the listener on a large scale (5 meters high sound cylinder) Inspired by Austrian architect and sound artist Bernhard Leitner. The concept derives from modern life as a human being where everything seems to be a race against time. ‘Sinkhole’ represents standing in a insurmountable sink under a giant tap where the listener hears pipes creaking and swelling, then the inevitable ‘water’ comes as sound, crashing vertically onto and around the listener. It is sonically big as well.

DMSA:You have been performing in quite a lot of bands. Any gigs coming up?

AB: I don’t have any gigs right now as I ‘walked’ from my two bands, ‘Undercover Agents’ and 20+ year old ‘Soul x Press’, I felt stuck and stagnated. Personally, from time to time, I do feel the need to maintain my place in the ‘un-comfort zone’ so I started a new project ‘Ditch the Demon’ where the music and band members are a little more ambitious.

DMSA: Other plans for the future? projects, events, visions?

AB: The future: I have applied for the DMSA M.A. which I am very excited about, I feel I need to continue my journey into all the aspects of sound phenomena in the field of sound art and design. I have a vision to gig, compose, freelance as a sound artist/designer and a session vocalist. I may even become an acoustician as well and sort out some live music venues !!

DMSA Alumni to participate at Koumaria Residency 2019

Jordan Edge and Joshua Legallienne (DMSA Team) will be among the invited artists to participate in this year’s Koumaria Residency.

Organised by intermedia collective Medea Electronique since 2009, the goal of the residency is the creation of an educational experience for the participants that will inspire and exalt their future work. The cross-cultural dialogues that the residency engenders both create new artistic speculations and smelt older assumptions. Past residents have formed lasting friendships and new artistic partnerships. Medea Electronique, being an eclectic art collective, is interested in people from diverse cultural and artistic backgrounds. For us the residency serves as a model for future creative endeavors.

More info: http://medeaelectronique.com/koumaria/#about

Soundcamp at Stave Hill Ecological Park

The 6th iteration of the soundcamp at Stave HIll Ecological Park will take place over the International Dawn Chorus Day weekend (4-5 May) with a program of live sounds of daybreak together with installations, walks, workshops and discussions exploring urban ecologies and sound.

The event is organised by Dr Maria Papadomanolaki and her colleagues at Soundcamp. This year it will also feature a new ‘Single-Material Performance’ by Joshua Legallienne (DMSA Team and DMSA alumni).

In Single-Material Performance, one or more performers manipulate a giant, bio-degradable plastic sheet to produce a range of complex sounds and rhythms. Due to the particular physical properties of the material, the sheet animates with very subtle changes in air pressure; causing the material to create sound as it interacts with itself. Performers respond to the fluctuations in air pressure by altering the form of the material to shape the sounds produced. The piece reveals the invisible and inaudible; sonifying infrasonic (sound waves below the lower limit of human audibility) variations in air pressure of the environment.

More info on the soundcamp project can be found here. The full program is here.

Visit is free. To camp please book a ticket here.

DMSA Alumni, Students and Staff showcased @ IWD2019

As part of the International Women’s Day 2019 campaign to #BalanceforBetter, Sound and Music showcase the profiles of 31 composers and their unique contributions to composition in the UK. Alumni Akiko Haruna and Guoda Dirzyte, current student Jade Gunner and DMSA Course Leader Dr Maria Papadomanolaki are profiled in the showcase that is part of the online archive of British Music Collection.

British Music Collection provides unparalleled access to the modern history of composition in the UK. Established in 1967 as a means for contemporary composers to deposit scores and recordings for performers to access, it now consists of almost 70,000 works and recordings from over 3000 20th and 21st century composers and sound artists.

The value in the collection is undeniable – providing access to over 50 years of contemporary composition – but it’s not without fault. The underrepresentation of female composers, or those who identify as female, across the original collection is stark, and a reminder of the progress that has been made, and must continue to happen, in and across new music.

Much of the British Music Collection now exists here online, and this provides a great opportunity to readdress this imbalance and the original aim of the collection: providing access to the work of contemporary composers.

DMSA Feature: Hannah Kemp Welch

This month we talk to Hannah Kemp Welch who grduated from the course in 2009. Hannah has been working as a social practice sound artist, working collaboratively with communities, educators and artists. Hannah has worked with communities across the UK, and shown works at Tate Modern, Middlesbrough Institute of Modern Art, Firstsite Colchester, and Nottingham Contemporary; Hannah is currently the Open House artist in residence at Kettle’s Yard, Cambridge.

DMSA: Where do we find you now?

HKW: I’m currently at Kettle’s Yard, the University of Cambridge’s modern and contemporary art gallery, on a year long residency . I’ve chosen to focus my research on early developments in radio in North Cambridge by the Pye Group, and create radio art works with local community groups, culminating in a day of broadcasts on the local radio station and a display at the gallery opening in March. I also run a music project in Brixton for people with mental health needs, creating new routes into music education, so that people in challenging circumstances can access quality music production spaces, equipment and resources.

DMSA: Three important words that represent you as a creative person

HKW: Social, committed, active.

DMSA: When did you start working with sound and music?

HKW: I’ve been running a community music project since 2013, and working on sound art commissions since a couple of years after completing my MA. I spent a year after university interning in art galleries, and then worked at Tate for 5 years on an action research project. This was great experience; I learnt about the variety of careers in the arts and grew my networks until I started to get commissions. I’m now a freelance artist and work on a variety of residencies, commissions and education projects.

DMSA: In what ways has the DMSA course supported or helped you to develop into who you are today creatively and professionally?

HKW: The DMSA course was my first introduction to sound art, a field I now work in. It offered an entry point, inspiration, and a space to experiment with ideas alongside support and guidance to create work. I learnt a lot of methodology, and was directed to artists and writers whose ideas were very influential in forming my work and values. I’ve stayed in touch Kersten Glandien, who has been very supportive of my work since supervising my dissertation 10 years ago.

DMSA: Can you tell us a bit more about Vanguard, your recent project for Art Gene?

HKW: In November 2018 I was selected for a residency in the Cumbrian town of Barrow-in-Furness, and lived and worked with ten artists to create new works in response to the local area. Barrow is famously where BAE Systems build nuclear submarines. As I’m vice-chair of the London branch of Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament, I felt a pull to make work about this controversial industry, yet was aware that a high percentage of Barrow residents are employed by BAE, so any response must be highly sensitive to the context. My work in Cambridge on the Open House residency programme had put me in touch with amateur radio operators, so I found a local meeting of Furness Amateur Radio Society and asked members questions about submarine communication systems. I interviewed local residents, recorded sounds of the docks, and attempted to listen to submarine transmissions via VLF, compiling my recordings into an audio work. The residency ended with an exhibition at Art Gene, and I made a zine to sit alongside the sound work with images and texts drawn from my research.

https://www.sound-art-hannah.com/vanguard

DMSA: Other plans for the future? projects, events, visions?

HKW: I’m working on a few other projects at the moment, delivering sound art workshops for October Gallery and contributing to a publication on arts education for Tate and TENT Rotterdam. An 8-channel sound work I created with my collaborator Lisa Hall is on display at Sound Reasons festival in New Delhi [and soon to be included in a series of concerts at London College of Communication, UAL. I’m preparing for Hyperlocal Radio , my display at Kettle’s Yard and takeover broadcast on World Radio Day. I’m also delivering lectures at Goldsmiths and for the V&A in February, and hoping to help out with Soundcamp in London on International Dawn Chorus Day in May.

Past this, I’m really keen to develop social practice sound art, seeing a potential to introduce new people to artistic audio production and a need to make sound art accessible and culturally relevant outside of the framework of institutions. I’d love to set up a sound art education studio, or work in a collective of social practice artists. Ideally, I’d like to spend as much time as possible on residencies, learning about new spaces and sharing ideas through sound.

Professional Practice Masterclass: Hannah Kemp Welch

The first Professional Practice Masterclass for 2019 is with Hannah Kemp Welch on Monday 14th January, 4:30-6, Performance studio.

Hannah Kemp-Welch is a social practice sound artist, working collaboratively with communities, educators and artists, to listen to the world around. Using a range of strategies such as sound recording, audio interventions, broadcasts, performance and digital making, works explore communication and ask how do we listen? and who can be heard?
Hannah has worked with communities across the UK, and shown works at Tate Modern, Middlesbrough Institute of Modern Art, Firstsite Colchester, and Nottingham Contemporary; Hannah is currently the Open House artist in residence at Kettle’s Yard, Cambridge.

Link:http://sound-art-hannah.com/

Session:
This session will focus on setting up as freelance artist, working with large and small institutions, and packaging your practice for residencies, commissions and open calls. Within this, there’ll be focus on socially engaged practice and community arts, exploring current debates in arts education. Students will gain insight into the value of collaboration and knowledge exchange with community groups and we’ll discuss strategies for engaging new audiences with sound arts.

OPENING NIGHT: All That Scratching Is Making Me Itch

ICA THEATRE
20:00 | Fri 11 Jan 2019
BOOK TICKETS

All That Scratching Is Making Me Itch is a en event curated by Stephen Mallinder featuring films by our students Aki Purser, Jedd Winterburn along with a fine selection of Scratch Video films, live music and more.

More info:
https://shortfilms.org.uk/lsff2019/events/2019-01-11-opening-night-all-that-scratching-is-making-me-itch

Joshua Legallienne to support Charalambides | The Rose Hill, 24 Nov

DMSA Alumni and current member of the DMSA team, Joshua Legallienne will be supporting the texan acid-folk duo (although this is a limiting label to their music) Charalambides on their Brighton concert at the Rose Hill on 24th November. Joshua will be performing a solo set for acoustic guitar which will be the perfect openenr for the duo’s hazy folk repertoire.

Charalambides founders Tom & Christina Carter dedicate themselves to a vision of iconoclastic music as transformative force. Touching on the outer limits of acid folk, psych rock, and improvisation, their sound remains uniquely personal & consistent. Formed in Houston in 1991, Charalambides has produced dozens of releases on labels like Siltbreeze, Time-Lag, Kranky, & their own imprint, Wholly Other. The duo will be touring in Europe in support of their forthcoming release, Proper, coming out in the autumn of 2018 with Drawing Room Records.

More info on the event here.