22nd August

Some of the volunteers carried on valiantly constructing corduroy paths covered in wood chips where we left off last week. But another team walked critically around the control area looking at the ash trees. Margaret pointed out that the wet spring and the sudden dry spell will have a detrimental affect to the shallow rooted ash trees and that this is normal. We took samples and looked hard for the tiny white toadstools which give strong indications of a Charlara attack. This is rare at the moment and we did not find any although we did find other signs. John and I then discussed using a felled ash tree for timber conversion before scything down the glade by the Trafalgar oak tree. Finally we agreed a date to remove the unused chipper and free up some space in the tool shed.

Margaret assesses whether the ash trees are being attacked by fungus or are struggling with the sudden dry spell.
Margaret assesses whether the ash trees are being attacked by fungus or are struggling with the sudden dry spell.
decisions are being made about converting this fallen ash into usable timber
decisions are being made about converting this fallen ash into usable timber
The glade is almost clear around the beautiful oak
The glade is almost clear around the beautiful oak
John is scything down the brambles in the glade around the Trafalgar oak tree
John is scything down the brambles in the glade around the Trafalgar oak tree

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