University of Brighton Design Archives

Collections • Collaboration • Research

A colourful collage of a human head made with torn tissue. Made by Theo Crosby. Taken from the Theo Crosby Archive housed at the University of Brighton Design Archives.

Theo Crosby

A colourful reclining female nude created by Theo Crosby from torn up pieces of tissue. Taken from the Theo Crosby Archive housed at the University of Brighton Design Archives.

Collage (no date). Uncatalogued.

Theo Crosby (1925-1994) was an architect, sculptor, writer and designer. Working collaboratively across a range of disciplines, he was influential in shaping perceptions of the built environment of the late twentieth century. Crosby studied in South Africa, before coming to Britain in the late 1940s. In London he became involved with the Independent Group and conceived its landmark exhibition ‘This is Tomorrow’, at the ICA in 1956. In 1965 he added his name to the practice of Forbes Fletcher Gill, which became Pentagram in 1972. Alongside his work at Pentagram, he sustained a wide range of other projects, including exhibitions such as ‘How to Play the Environment Game’ (Hayward Gallery, 1973). One of his most celebrated architectural projects is Shakespeare’s Globe, which was completed after his death.

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A colour transparency of a man looking at simple illustrations part of The Environment Game by Theo Crosby. Taken from the Theo Crosby Archive housed at the University of Brighton Design Archives.

The Environment Game (no date). Uncatalogued.

A coloured pencil drawing of a busy restaurant scene sketched by Theo Crosby. Taken from the Theo Crosby Archive housed at the University of Brighton Design Archives.

Sketch of a restaurant scene (no date). Catalogued.

A colour transparency showing an interior view from Unilever, designed by Theo Crosby. Taken from the Theo Crosby Archive housed at the University of Brighton Design Archives.

Unilever interior (no date). Uncatalogued.

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Sirpa Kutilainen • January 1, 1998


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