Worthing Crematorium garden with trees and the building with blue sky

Brighton researchers helping create world’s first hydrogen-powered crematorium

A project to create the world’s first hydrogen-powered crematorium is being supported by a team of researchers from the University of Brighton.

The pioneering project, funded by the Department for Energy Security and Net Zero, is centred on Worthing Crematorium in West Sussex and is part of Adur & Worthing Council’s plan to become carbon neutral by 2030.

This summer, cremator manufacturer DFW Europe will begin testing pioneering hydrogen technology at its base in the Netherlands. If these tests are successful, the technology will be brought over to trial at Worthing Crematorium as early as spring 2024.

Dr Kevin Wyche, Pete Lyons and Dr Kirsty Smallbone from the University of Brighton’s School of Applied Sciences are carrying out air quality monitoring on the project to demonstrate that the proposed new hydrogen-powered system can dramatically reduce carbon emissions without worsening air quality.

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Starting at uni with us in 2023?

We know you’re going to have a brilliant time here and to get your student life off to the best possible start find out all the information you’ll need by visiting the dedicated Starting at Uni pages on the University of Brighton website.

Come along to one of our online events, details of the next one below 👇

Get ready for your course: School of Applied Sciences

Friday 28 July 2023 – 10-11am online
Hear about how you can prepare for your subject and ask any questions to get your studies off to the best start. For students studying: biology, ecology and conservation, biomedical science, geography, and environment, or pharmacy.

Online enrolment

You can enrol from August 21 and we’ll send you an email to remind you.  Once you’ve enrolled, you’ll be able to access My Studies where you’ll find all the information you need to prepare for your course.

Still have questions? Chat to a current student online.

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What is it like studying a pharmacy degree?

Hi, I’m Eva and I’m a third year Pharmacy MPharm student. Here is my experience of studying at University of Brighton – from lectures and work experience to getting support, my favourite places, social life, living in Brighton, and tips on making and saving money.

How I found university different from college

I struggled with the jump from GCSE to A-level at college and got really stressed that the only form of assessment was one set of exams. Uni isn’t like that; there are multiple forms of assessment including exams, coursework, and OSCEs (live spoken exams, role play style), assessed at different points throughout the year. This takes some of the pressure off the end-of-year exams and gives me a better idea of how I’m doing academically throughout the year.

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Discussing solutions to current challenges at the Planning for Water conference

It’s not often these days that you hear people say ‘money is not the problem’, but that was one of the more surprising contributions at a recent Planning for Water  conference hosted by the Centre for Aquatic Environments and the Royal Town Planning Institute SE region at the University.

The 19th June conference brought together almost 70 town planners, engineers, developers, academics, charities, water companies and government officials to discuss solutions to some of the current challenges that water quality, water scarcity, climate change and the biodiversity crisis present to the building sector.

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Brighton’s unique perspective

Abeer Aamir, third year Pharmacy MPharm student, tells us more about her experience so far of studying here.

You can read about how Abeer won the this year’s David Kearney Award from the British Pharmaceutical Students’ Association (BPSA) here.

What made you choose Brighton and your course?

I’ll start with the course part first. Pharmacy has always kind of been at the forefront of my career focus, and that is entirely because of my parents. They’ve had the biggest influence even before I was born.

My dad worked in the pharmaceutical sales industry specialising in dermatology. So literally my entire childhood was me helping him study his materials and things like that, or listening to his presentations that he would be giving to doctors and pharmacists. So that exposed me to the whole world of clinical medicine for the first time.

And then on the other side my mother worked in a hospital – as a medical lab technologist, I believe. But she studied as a microbiologist, so she also helped cultivate that interest and that love for science. I remember on one of my birthdays, she got out an old microscope and she had all her old pathology slides to show me and stuff like that.

So, they’ve always fostered that love for healthcare and the sciences and trying to find the clinical aspect of everything. And then when I was in high school, I decided to just dip my toe into pharmacy, to see if I liked it or not. I volunteered at a pharmacy near me, at a major chain back in Canada [Abeer is from Toronto]. And they loved me enough that they hired me! So, I ended up working there for three years.

So, it’s safe to say that I absolutely adored the profession as well. So that just deepened my love for pharmacy.

And the one thing that I noticed when I was there was that I always wanted to make patients the forefront of what I was doing and how I was learning. So, Brighton ended up being my choice to study because it offers such a unique perspective in the way that the course is delivered.

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Abeer Aamir

Brighton pharmacy student wins prestigious national award

Thanks to her exceptional work in advancing equality, diversity and inclusion (EDI) at the University of Brighton, Pharmacy MPharm student Abeer Aamir has won this year’s David Kearney Award from the British Pharmaceutical Students’ Association (BPSA).

Abeer, who has just finished her third year, described herself as “incredibly grateful and humbled” to receive the prestigious national award, which recognises outstanding contribution to pharmacy over the past 12 months. 

The nomination calls Abeer’s commitment to promoting inclusivity and diversity within the pharmacy profession “a testament to her dedication to advancing the field, keeping patients safe, and making it more equitable and accessible for all individuals”.

“As a first-generation immigrant and a pharmacy student, I’ve seen both sides of the coin,” Abeer said. “I’ve seen the ways in which medical racism penetrates the healthcare profession, and it really does disproportionately affect people of colour and women. So, using all that lived experience, I really hope to shine a light on unconscious bias and unconscious medical racism, so that the curriculum is a lot more reflective of the population that our graduates are serving.”

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Bhavik in the lab wearing a white lab coat with colours writing and drawing

University of Brighton scientist wins prestigious Royal Society of Chemistry Prize

Professor Bhavik Patel has won the Royal Society of Chemistry’s Analytical Science mid-career Prize in recognition of brilliance in research and innovation.

Based at the University of Brighton’s School of Applied Sciences, the Professor of Clinical and Bioanalytical Chemistry has been named winner of the prize for the development of innovative electrochemical sensors for advancing the understanding of biological signalling processes. This year’s winners join a prestigious list of past winners in the RSC’s prize portfolio, 60 of whom have gone on to win Nobel Prizes for their work, including 2022 Nobel laureate Carolyn Bertozzi and 2019 Nobel laureate John B Goodenough.

After receiving the prize, Professor Patel said: “This prize is real recognition for me and my group on our research approach to create sensors which are fit-for-purpose and provide impactful knowledge about biological systems.”

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Group of students standing in front of a presentation about Sickle Cell Disease

Donor Research – co-creating student-led donation awareness education

The University of Brighton Donor Research Team is comprised of student champions and academics from the School of Sport and Health Sciences and the School of Applied Sciences, and wider collaborators from other universities, organisations, charities and the NHS.

It has been a busy year for the team with another round of funding secured from NHS Blood and Transplant (NHSBT) to continue our work in educating the student population on organ and blood donation to address the health inequalities in ethnic communities. Read about the new funding secured by the University of Brighton’s Donor Research team.

To further develop our work the team invited Stephanie George from Red Cells R us to share her experience of having Sickle Cell Anaemia at the Year 3 Healthcare Student Interprofessional Conference in April. Swetha Kalaimani, a University of Brighton Donor Research Student Champion, interviewed Stephanie. Read about Stephanie and her experiences.

Rebecca Craig and Charlotte Humphris, academics in the School of Sport and Health Sciences, have also been working with Stephanie to transform the BSc nursing curriculum to be inclusive of Sickle Cell Anaemia and the service users experience. Learn more about this important work.

Learn more about the Donor Research Team’s work and how you can collaborate as a student, colleague or researcher:

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Brighton research reveals hidden sexual abuse of men and barriers to seeking support

University of Brighton researchers have investigated what prevents men reporting incidents of unwanted sexual contact and seeking support in new report.

Exploring this overlooked area of sexual abuse, the MUSE (Men’s Unwanted Sexual Experiences) project uncovered not just the extent of the problem but the reluctance of many victims to report incidents through formal routes – such as the police or a GP – as well as the challenges of seeking informal support from family and friends. Research revealed that a key barrier was the perception held by many that unwanted sexual experiences happen to and impact women, and not men.

Dr Carl Bonner-Thompson, senior lecturer at the University of Brighton’s School of Applied Sciences, is one of the researchers behind the project in collaboration with the Male Survivors Partnership and Mankind UK. Alongside University of Brighton colleagues Dr Kirsty McGregor and Dr Jason Preston, Dr Bonner-Thompson interviewed a number of men in both the south-east and north-east of England as part of the project.

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