Urban model with building and roads

Fellowship for Senior Lecturer


Andrew Coleman, Senior Lecturer on the MSc Town Planning and Chartered Apprenticeship Degree, has been elected as a Fellow of the Royal Town Planning Institute.

The Royal Town Planning Institute (RTPI) is a leading membership organisation and a Chartered Institute responsible for maintaining professional standards and accrediting world class planning courses nationally and internationally. The organisation champions the power of planning in creating prosperous places and vibrant communities. Fellowship is one of the highest professional attainments available to a planner and Fellows must have made a major personal contribution to the planning profession for the benefit of the public.

Andrew Coleman headshot

Andrew Coleman’s research reflects a deep specialism in environmentalism and how to manage the risk of flooding through the planning system. He has contributed to government, government agency and research organisation projects and gained a wide range of experience, from working in private and public sectors, including in academia, as well as practising internationally, in Trinidad and Tobago. He is co-author of guidance on delivering better water management through the planning system and also a board member of the University of Brighton’s Centre for Earth Observation Science.

Speaking about the Fellowship Andrew Coleman said, “I am very honoured to be elected as Fellow of the RTPI. Ever since joining the RTPI, I have retained a profound belief that planning can deliver a better present and future for people and the environment.

“Pursuing this objective is becoming even more urgent given the climate and biodiversity crises facing the world. In my current teaching, research, RTPI and environmental activist roles, I am dedicated to equipping current and future planners with the tools to meet these challenges and my election as a Fellow demonstrates the importance that the RTPI places on addressing these issues.”

Ruth Smith profile photo

Graduate stories: Ruth Smith

Ruth graduated from Geography BA(Hons) in 2018. Read about her time studying here and how her career is progressing.

Why I chose the University of Brighton and this course

I love Brighton as a city, the sea, the vibrancy and all the good things happening there so it was an obvious choice! Combined with this, I noticed that the course had the choice to opt in and out of a range of topics to adapt the course to my preferences and interests! I chose to go down the more social geography route rather than environmental but loved the choice of both.

Continue reading “Graduate stories: Ruth Smith”
Group of students in the woods on a bat hunt

Third year bat surveys at Woods Mill

As part of the Ecological Impact Assessment module, students met Ryan Greaves, from the Bat Conservation Trust and we had the fantastic opportunity to take part in bat box checks.

The mild weather in late September meant that bats were still active and around! After an in-depth lecture on bat species and their ecology, an intro to bat boxes and the different survey tools at hand, we were ready to go an check some boxes. This year was a really good one and we found some common pipistrelle in a couple of boxes.

As part of the standard bat survey, measurements were taken, we had our smallest male with 4.5g. Pipistrelle weigh the same as a £1 coin! We concluded our training day with a bat walk, using bat detectors and listening to the clapping of the bats feeding above our heads!

This was a great start of term!

Graduate stories: Harry McKenzie

I chose the University of Brighton because I’ve always enjoyed Brighton as a place and I chose the Geography BA(Hons) course because I’ve always enjoyed learning about the world and its inhabitants.

The course was a good mix of everything, and I really enjoyed the media modules in my final year. I didn’t enjoy my work placement much, but I learned a lot and the experience drove me to up my game in final year and really get stuck into the course. Some of the best times of my life were spent studying (and partying) in Brighton – no doubt. The highlights of my course were the field trip to Morocco, the final year media crossover module and the study of discourse and power.

Continue reading “Graduate stories: Harry McKenzie”
Three males in a line smiling at the camera

Prize award for Geography student

Congratulations to final year Geography BSc student Dom Jarvis who has been awarded the inaugural Richard Reed Prize sponsored by Friends of the South Downs.

The Richard Reed prize, named after one of the co-founders of the Friends of the South Downs, is an award of £500 for the most improved performance by a BSc/BA student within our Geography, the Earth and Environment subject area. It is based on their academic results over their first and second years.

Dom (centre) was presented with the award by Paul Wilkinson (right) Membership & Marketing Committee Chair for Friends of the South Downs and Dr Matthew Brolly (left), Principal Lecturer in geography and environmental sciences courses at the University of Brighton.

Abeer and Grace with Simmone Weeks

Eat, Drink, Represent: SAS Course Rep Network 

When it comes to a university experience, it’s not just about hitting the books. It’s about forging connections, making memories, and finding your place within the academic community. On Wednesday, 4th October 2023, Student Engagement Lead, Simonne Weeks and Student Engagement Partners, Abeer Aamir and Grace Oreyeni with BSU’s Engagement Manager, Paul Murtough and BSU President, Ilia Katz hosted an event that embodied all these elements and more – the “Eat, Drink, Represent: Course Rep Network” gathering at The Venue. 

Continue reading “Eat, Drink, Represent: SAS Course Rep Network “
Matt Ingram, Melanie Flint, Kirsty Smallbone, Funmilola and Jenny Minto with one of the mannequins.

‘Sim people’ help teach student pharmacists

Student pharmacists will be able to test their treatment skills on three new ‘sim people’ following a reorganisation of teaching space.

The idea is to hone students’ communication skills and decision-making when faced with patients in a variety of challenging scenarios. By ‘treating’ the mannequins for medical conditions such as anaphylactic shock, taking a blood pressure or responding to unspecified pain, our student pharmacists can build confidence before clinical placements.

  • Safoora Azimi-Yancheshmeh administers asthma medication to one of the 'Sim' people
  • Laptops showing video link of mannequins
  • Dr Funmilola Fisusi demonstrates a therapy session with one of the 'Sim' people
  • Dr Melanie Flint mimics examining the breasts of on of the 'Sim' people

Lecturers don’t even have to be in the room to see how students are performing – they can keep tabs on what’s going on from a separate centre of operations via a live video link. As well as responding realistically to different medications, the mannequins also include a hidden microphone, which will allow lecturers to ‘speak’ on their behalf and respond in real time to what students are doing.

Jenny Minto, Principal Technician in the School of Applied Sciences, has been helping to set up the mannequins. She said: “In the past, students have had to work in quite large groups and haven’t had much hands-on experience, but now they can all have a turn as opposed to watching everybody else. When we get them in small groups, they can really have a go rather than feel embarrassed about getting it wrong in front of their peers.”

The student pharmacists will also be able to practise what it would be like to call other healthcare professionals – for example, to request a consult – via a telephone link from the treatment rooms to the lecturers’ centre of operations.

Hands-on experience

The mannequins were purchased two years ago from Laerdal but the reorganisation of teaching space in Huxley building on Moulsecoomb campus means that they can now be used to their full potential. The fully articulated dummies can be posed in a number of ways and the hope is to have them in a variety of situations – lying down on a hospital bed hooked up to a heart monitor, for example, or sitting up in a facsimile of a GP’s consulting room.

In line with other Inclusive Practice work being done in the School of Applied Sciences, the mannequins were chosen with diversity in mind, with dark hair and skin. They also come with interchangeable genitals and detachable breasts, meaning that student pharmacists can practise treating patients of different sexes – for example, examining the model breasts for lumps to rule out breast cancer.

Dr Melanie Flint, Reader in Cancer Research and the leader of a stress and breast cancer programme at the University, is excited by the possibilities. “I teach the breast cancer case for Pharmacy,” she said. “In our workshops we take students from diagnosis to living with cancer, as part of which an advanced clinical care nurse will come in and show them how to palpate breast tissue. That’s very important for Pharmacy students, with one in seven women being diagnosed with breast cancer in their lifetime. Although Pharmacy students don’t currently perform breast exams, they do get people coming into the clinic with suspected lumps so they need to learn about that.”

Having the mannequins will be invaluable, she believes, not just to give a physical demonstration but as a way of helping students to practise talking to patients. “The most important part is the communication,” she said. “Even if you have somebody who’s newly diagnosed who comes into the pharmacy clinic, if you’ve got a pharmacist who knows about this and can show empathy, they’re the skill sets we want to get from our workshops.”

According to Dr Matt Ingram, Associate Dean (Academic Operations) in the School of Applied Sciences and Principal Lecturer in Pharmaceutical Sciences, the new facilities have the potential to supplement students’ learning in other ways too. “The idea is that, in addition to their usual lectures, the students will be able to book one of the rooms to come in and practise, subject to availability,” he said.

“Thanks to the video links, one lecturer can see what’s going on in multiple different rooms simultaneously – and it can be streamed over Teams so our clinical team can observe when they are off site. There is also a facility to record to the cloud as well as livestream. These systems are fully compliant with General Data Projection Regulations (GDPR). Under supervision, students may be able to watch back and assess their performance later.”

Dr Simon Jeffs close up outside looking at the camera to the side and smiling

Meet Dr Simon Jeffs

Dr Simon Jeffs is Admissions Tutor for our Pharmacy MPharm and Pharmacy MPharm with preparatory year courses.

My journey to teaching
I came to teaching by a very roundabout route via zoology, parasitology, a PhD on tapeworms and 20 years developing HIV vaccines! This has given me a comprehensive knowledge of all types of pathogens and how to control them.

I started teaching medical and postgraduate virology students at Imperial College London then transferred to Brighton.

Continue reading “Meet Dr Simon Jeffs”
Jacques Burrowes in graduation gown and hat smiling at camera, Brighton beach in the background

I chose Geography mainly because of its employability

Jacques Burrowes recently graduated from our Geography BA(Hons) and is doing a job he loves all thanks to his degree. We caught up with Jacques to find out more.

I chose Geography mainly because of its employability – it’s one of the best degrees out there for job prospects. I was an Auto-Electrician before I came to University and I wasn’t really being developed by my employer, so I came to university to develop myself and have a shot somewhere where I could progress

Geography BA is a diverse course that gets you experienced in a multitude of geographical disciplines. It’s great that the course gets you experienced in a variety of geographic studies from digital geographies, feminist geographies and social and cultural geographies. It opened my eyes up to what was considered geography. It’s literally everything by the way!

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TEF silver 2023 logo

Brighton secures national Silver Award for teaching excellence

The University of Brighton has been recognised for the quality of its teaching and student outcomes in a UK-wide evaluation of higher education institutions.

The university has today secured a Silver award in the national Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF). The award confirms that the student experience and student outcomes across all of the university’s undergraduate provision including apprenticeships are “typically very high quality”, delivering excellence above the rigorous standards set for the UK’s higher education providers. The rating lasts for four years, until September 2027.

The TEF is a national scheme run by the Office for Students (OfS). It aims to encourage universities to improve and deliver excellence in the areas that students care about the most: teaching, learning and achieving positive outcomes from their studies.

Continue reading “Brighton secures national Silver Award for teaching excellence”