Model of a body's internal organs

Why study at Brighton? The Huxley building!

Biological Sciences student Sandra Skubis tells us about one of her favourite spots at uni.

One of my favourite places at Brighton University is Huxley Building located at the Moulsecoomb campus.

Specialist facilities at Brighton

Huxley itself has seven floors, mainly filled with specialised labs but also lecture halls and offices. My favourite floors are the 4th and 5th as this is where I spend most of my time participating in practicals. Whenever I enter the premises of this building, I’m amazed by the amount and variety of equipment available. The most impressive apparatus I’ve seen so far includes an NMR machine, spectrophotometers, 3D printers, DNA sequencing system and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectrometer.

Continue reading “Why study at Brighton? The Huxley building!”

Kieran Tang

My tips for success

Kieran Tang graduated from Geography BA(Hons) in 2018 – here’s what he has to say about his time here:

Studying Geography BA(Hons) at the University of Brighton opened my eyes to a plethora of course content, numerous routes for future career opportunities, the wonderful area of Brighton, and the occasional field trip.

The best aspect of the course is the wealth of different modules you can study, and how you can start to specialise in certain areas. During the course of my degree, I began to shape my learning on planning, the environment, and sustainable development.

Continue reading “My tips for success”

Group of people about to get on a boat

Inshore Fisheries and Conservation Authority boat trip

MRes Ecology and Conservation student Sarah George, really enjoyed the day spent on the Sussex IFCA boat (Inshore Fisheries and Conservation Authority), as part of the Ecotoxicology module.

“The boat trip with the IFCA was a real education and I’m so grateful for this opportunity.  I have not previously experienced aquatic sampling and just being able to be part of the process and see how things were done was fantastic – even down to the clear sequential labelling of samples and being able to visualise how large a sample actually was (much smaller than I’d thought).

Simple things like rinsing the filter with clean water rather than seawater make so much more sense when you’re there as you can visualise how this would alter the sample you’d just collected.  Setting up and operating the sediment grab is something you can only really appreciate by doing it, the idea is simple but actually getting it to work needs hands on experience.   Again, being able to see how the sediment varied from site to site and even from one side of the boat to the other, told a really strong story.

Continue reading “Inshore Fisheries and Conservation Authority boat trip”
photo of Mark Walker, Town Planning MSc graduate

Mark’s route into town planning

Graduating from our Town Planning MSc has led Mark Walker to embark on a brand new career. He tells us more about his route into a town planning career.

  • What were you doing before your postgraduate studies at Brighton?

I was the News Editor and Director of Communications at Latest TV, a terrestrial television station based in Brighton and covering the South Coast of the UK. Before then, I worked for a local newspaper and I have also previously worked in the House of Commons for a Member of Parliament, in the European Parliament for two Members of the Parliament and was then a Director of Policy and Advocacy for a major Healthcare Public Affairs Consultancy. I am now working as a Planning Officer at Adur and Worthing Councils, having gained employment in the planning sector very quickly after finishing my course.

  • What made you choose the University of Brighton and this course?

Firstly, the City of Brighton and Hove is a great location for a University and for a place of study. I was born in Brighton and love the area and already knew that the University of Brighton was the perfect place for the MSc. Furthermore, the MSc Town Planning course is accredited by the Royal Town Planning Institute (RTPI) and the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) and has an excellent record in regards to employment opportunities after graduating from the course.

  • Can you describe your course and experience of studying here?

The course was a mixture of learning about the theory behind town planning, exploring contemporary planning issues, such as the impact of climate change on development, and also gaining practical experience through the Environment Placement module. I found the course very rewarding, even though it was conducted largely online via Microsoft Teams, and the Course Leader, Georgia Wrighton, as well as Dr Helen Walker and Andrew Coleman, adapted very well to the changing circumstances which we all found ourselves in. The support staff were also very good and it was clear from the start of the course that help was always available if needed.

  • Was it what you expected, can you explain?

Yes, the course was conducted as I expected given I had heard good things about the course from previous graduates and I had already been given excellent customer service from University of Brighton staff in my communication leading up to the start of the course. Also, given the difficulties with studying for the course during the Covid-19 pandemic, it ran very smoothly on the whole and the course staff adapted very well to the changing circumstances.

  • What were the highlights of your course?

The highlights of the course were the Environment Placement module, where I was lucky enough to gain work experience as a Planning Assistant at Adur and Worthing Councils, as well as the Planning Theory module, where it was fascinating to learn about the theoretical concepts behind the Town Planning academic discipline. Another highlight was the Dissertation module, given I focused on a local topic close to my heart; rethinking utopia in urban coastal communities. The chance to influence planning policy at Peacehaven Town Council was also very memorable and to work as a team with fellow students.

  • What are you doing now you have graduated?

I am currently working as a Planning Officer at Adur and Worthing Councils, starting in March, 2022. I am enjoying it a lot, particularly working on the Adur Local Plan.

  • What was it about this industry that first interested you?

One of my passions and interests is politics, particularly British and European politics, and, arguably, planning does involve a certain degree of political involvement in order for it to function at a local government level. With my former work for Latest TV as a News Editor, I also became aware of a lot of planning related issues which I wanted to explore further. With the Covid-19 pandemic I also decided I wanted a career change which incorporated the skills I gained during my previous work experience in politics and the news media.

  • What do you recommend about it?

The structure of the course blends theory and contemporary planning issues with the chance to gain valuable practical work experience also, so that is a big bonus. The fact that the course was accredited by the RTPI and RICS was also very important for me.

  • What would you recommend about your course?

The tutoring is excellent, the structure of the course well designed and it all happens at a great local in the City of Brighton and Hove.

  • How important are the knowledge and skills gained on your course to your job and why?

The skills I gained were very important, particularly the analytical skills in sifting through the different sources of knowledge and statistical information relating to planning applications whilst at Adur and Worthing Councils and the modules relating the Sustainable Urbanism in Coastal Communities and Comparative Practice in Property and Planning are essential to my current job as Planning Officer also.

  • What advice would you give to someone who is thinking of applying for this course / this university?

I would definitely go ahead and get a place on the course! It is well worth it!

  • How do you feel now you have graduated?

I feel very happy and think that undertaking the course was a very good career move, given that I was lucky enough to find a full time job in the planning sector very quickly so soon afterwards.

  • What are your plans for the future?

I am now working as a Planning Officer for Adur and Worthing Councils and I plan to work there to learn as much as I can at a local authority level, including with sustainability appraisals, day to day planning applications, the development of local plans and changes in national planning policy.

  • Did your course help you to decide on or plan your career / decide to apply for your job? If yes, how did it help?

Yes, the fact that I gained valuable work experience at Adur and Worthing Councils during the course was a key factor in me applying for the Planning Officer position at the same employer after I completed the course. It helped because I already knew people who worked at Adur and Worthing LPA and, perhaps more importantly, I already understood many of the key planning policies.

Watch this vide of course leader Georgia Wrighton chatting to Mark about the course on Latest TV.

Head shot of Neesha, Biomedical Science student

Why I decided to become an Inclusive Practice Partner

What is the Inclusive Practice Partners (IPP) Scheme?

The Inclusive Practice Partners Scheme is a collaboration between students and academic staff at the University of Brighton. It is a programme that aims to diversify and decolonise the curriculum and pedagogy within higher education. What this essentially means is that students work alongside staff to produce a list of recommendations for improvement within these areas in their own subject area. I study Biomedical Science and I have forwarded changes in some of the literature searches, in how critical analysis is marked for future students, and recommended unconscious bias training and guest speakers within modules based on my own lived experiences of studying my course. Continue reading “Why I decided to become an Inclusive Practice Partner”

data with silhouette of hands

Critical Digital Geographies – a new module

We’re excited to announce that we have a new second year Geography, the Earth and Environment undergraduate module starting in the 22/23 academic year – Critical Digital Geographies. The use of digital technologies to transform work, homes, cities, romantic relationships, exercise, health and transport (to name a few), is one of the most pressing contemporary societal challenges, providing exciting possibilities but also new power struggles. Continue reading “Critical Digital Geographies – a new module”

Bearspace logo

New study shows plus-size men face stigma in gay spaces 

A study by University of Brighton researcher Nick McGlynn is spotlighting the often difficult  experiences of fatter men in gay spaces across the UK.

Dr McGlynn’s report – entitled Bearspace – is the largest ever study of the UK’s community of ‘Bears’, a term referring to big and hairy gay men who typically present in a more ‘masculine’ way, and who make up one of the UK’s largest gay male subcultures. This groundbreaking research explores the experiences of fat gay, bi and queer (GBQ) men in spaces used and created by Bear communities in the UK, drawing on data from focus groups, interviews and Nick’s own observations.

Continue reading “New study shows plus-size men face stigma in gay spaces “
Graduation photo of Jen Wyatt

Bringing regeneration plans to life

Find out how gaining her Geography BA(Hons) in 2018 led Jen to planning and delivering regeneration programmes in town centres, and what advice she has about life as a Brighton student.

Things that helped me to choose Geography at the University of Brighton were the enthusiastic lecturers, diverse course content, unique field trips, and location of the Uni itself. Continue reading “Bringing regeneration plans to life”