Profesor Yannis Pitsiladis in the labs

World recognition for University research to beat the cheats

A gene test developed at the University of Brighton to catch doping cheats could be introduced at next year’s Olympic Games in Tokyo, International Olympic Committee (IOC) President Thomas Bach has announced.

Instead of looking for traces of illegal drugs in urine and blood samples, Professor Yannis Pitsiladis, the University’s Professor of Sport and Exercise Science, has researched RNA or Ribonucleic acid which together with DNA and proteins are essential for all forms of life.

And he has discovered drugs can leave a tell-tale signature in RNA. Read More

Young adults playing handball

How mixed-sex team games could reduce physical education injuries

Mixed-sex team games such as korfball and handball are examples of sports that can be taught in secondary schools without the need for physical contact, says a University of Brighton academic.

Dr Gary Stidder of the School of Sport and Service Management put forward this notion in the light of recent research into the safety and wellbeing of pupils in physical education school lessons.

A range of modified team games designed to eliminate direct contact with opponents have recently been introduced to PGCE and School Direct trainee teachers of physical education.

Dr Stidder believes that these new team games are timely, and will help to bring about a shift in the way that pupils in schools view sport. He said: “Physical education is not synonymous with sport. They are two completely different things.” Read More

A photo of building ablaze on a dark evening

Brighton leads firefighters’ health risk research

University of Brighton researchers have been leading the way on a study to see if firefighters are suffering serious health problems from exposure to high levels of harmful chemicals.

For the past year they have been taking blood and urine samples from more than 140 firefighters to determine if there is a link between exposure and incidents among them of diseases including cancer. Read More

Atletes on the track

A pill to protect athletes from overheating

A School of Sport and Service Management professor has developed a new temperature monitory system that uses a small core temperature-monitoring “pill” to help protect athletes from heat exhaustion.

The temperature monitoring eco-system being developed by Professor Yannis Pitsiladis, the University’s Professor of Sport and Exercise Science, uses sensors inside a tiny capsule which relay information via Smartwatches on how an athlete’s body is coping with high temperatures during a race.

Medical staff monitoring the information would be alerted if a competitor’s readings were indicating signs of heat stress or hyperthermia and the athlete could be withdrawn. This technology can also help provide more rapid, accurate and dignified temperature assessment at the road/track side in medical emergencies. Read More

Professor Yannis Pitsiladis in his white coat in the labs

Catching up with Professor Yannis Pitsiladis

We speak to the Professor of Sport and Exercise Science about how the University’s at the forefront of anti-doping research.

​Professor Yannis Pitsiladis, who’s also a member of the International Olympic Committee’s Medical and Scientific Commission and chairs the Science Commission of the International Federation of Sports Medicine, also discusses the case of Caster Semenya and intersex athletes and his mission to lead a team to a sub-2 hour marathon, completely within athletics regulations.​

As a member of several high-profile organisations, Yannis is at the forefront of helping to solve some of sport’s most pressing issues.

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the group in the lobby

Building bridges with China

University academics boosted research collaboration and cooperation during visits to China. 

Promoting the benefits of genetic testing in health and disease applications were the subjects discussed by Professor Yannis Pitsiladis, the University’s Professor of Sport and Exercise Science, during one visit. 

He and Dr Guan Wang, Research Fellow in the School of Sport and Service Management, also discussed the advantages of biomedicine, artificial intelligence, and engineering.  Read More

Professor Yannis Pitsiladis in his white coat in the labs

40 transgender athletes volunteer for Brighton research

University of Brighton scientists are researching how to resolve international controversy over whether transgender sportswomen are competing fairly.

Professor Yannis Pitsiladis and colleagues are conducting a study of more than 40 individuals going through transition, with the aim of determining the fairest way of integrating transgender athletes into elite sport.

Testosterone increases muscle mass and under International Olympic Committee (IOC) guidelines athletes who have transitioned from male to female are required to keep their levels of testosterone under 10 nanomoles per litre. Read More

Women firefighters: the added risks

More female firefighters are being hired but new research, co-led by the University of Brighton, suggests that fire services need to ensure appropriate consideration is given to female specific needs. 

More than 800 women firefighters from 14 different countries, 255 in the UK, told researchers via an online survey that they face injury, illness and heat illness risk at similar rates to that of male firefighters. The report said specific issues such as protective equipment, clothing, health issues and long-term training need further consideration and improvement.   Read More

the new gym facilities

Boosting facilities for students

A new gym, learning space and seminar room have been unveiled at the University’s Eastbourne campus.

The Queenwood Seminar Room and Social Learning Spaces feature state-of-the-art furniture and technology to facilitate student collaboration. Key additions include two edit suit rooms, USB power chargers throughout and fixed and flexible furniture, including coffee tables and collaboration desks.

The Queenwood G30 seminar room has capacity for 54 people. The space is highly flexible and features bespoke desks that can be folded and stacked away. A height-adjustable lectern provides increased flexibility during lectures. Read More

a picture of Nick with a paralympic athlete

Catching up with Professor Nick Webborn

As a preview to his upcoming inaugural lecture we spoke to the clinical professor of sport and exercise medicine at the University.

Nick Webborn OBE has been at the forefront in the development of Paralympic medicine, and is now chair of the British Paralympic Association.

Nick incurred a spinal cord injury while serving in the Royal Air Force in 1981 and his own experience of the rehabilitation process inspired his career in sports medicine. In this episode, ahead of his inaugural lecture on Wednesday 27 February, Paralympic Sports Medicine – The Evolution of a Specialty, Nick traces the story of his career journey and mission to bring the same level of support to Paralympians as Olympians.

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