Doing the maths. Photo by Antoine Dautry on Unsplash

Doing the maths

Global experts are coming to Brighton to discuss how maths can better assist science and engineering research.

The 15th International Conference on Integral Methods in Science and Engineering (IMSE) is being held on the Moulsecoomb campus of the University of Brighton in July.

IMSE 2018 will provide opportunities for scientists and engineers to exchange information and ideas that support their work. Experts from the USA, France, Germany and Edinburgh have accepted invitations to give keynote presentations, as has Professor Sergei Sazhin, the University of Brighton’s Professor of Thermal Physics.

The conference, at the University’s Huxley Building, is hosted by the University’s School of Computing, Engineering and Mathematics.

The conference is being organised by Dr Paul Harris from the School of Computing, Engineering and Mathematics in association with colleagues from the University of Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA.

To register, go to: http://blogs.brighton.ac.uk/imse2018/registration/

Celebrating International Women’s Day 2018

To mark International Women’s Day in 2018 we are celebrating the achievements of just some of the academics working here at Brighton.

Our Women of Impact web feature demonstrates how our academic staff are achieving great things, working on the complex challenges facing society, educating and inspiring the next generation and making an impact in communities. The varied and diverse career journeys illustrate the huge range of talent that we welcome at the University of Brighton.

From maths read these profiles

Dr Gem Stapleton

Dr Gem Stapleton – Making Data Accessible
Dr Gem Stapleton is helping to improve our understanding of data and information, inspired by its potentially transformative nature for both society and industry.

 

Professor Alison BruceProfessor Alison Bruce – Experimental Nuclear Physicist
Professor Alison Bruce is an experimental nuclear physicist who uses the techniques of gamma-ray spectroscopy
to study the properties of exotic nuclei.

Picturing problems

From assembling Ikea furniture to complex computing, using intuitive shapes and diagrams can open up new opportunities for communicating and solving problems.

If you enjoy puzzles come and find out how diagrammatic reasoning can improve your problem solving and see if you can crack some fiendish challenges at the Gardner Tower, Attenborough Centre, University of Sussex, from 11.30 – 12.30 on Thursday 7 September.

The British Science Festival 2017 begins on September 5 and runs through till September 9.

Book your tickets: https://www.britishsciencefestival.or…

Soapbox Science’s first visit to Brighton

Head down to the seafront between 1-4pm on Saturday 29 July and celebrate women in Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics and Medicine (STEMM) with Soapbox Science.

Soapbox Science hosts events across the UK and the world raising the profile of women in science – breaking down barriers and challenging stereotypes about who a researcher is. And they are coming to Brighton for the first time this summer.
Chantal Nobs, a PhD student at the University of Brighton, was one of 12 women selected to participate in the Soapbox Science London event on London’s Southbank in 2016.

Find out more about the Brighton event here.

Soapbox science

A scientist from our school left her lab to stand on a soapbox to explain nuclear physics to members of the public and to help eliminate gender inequality in science.

Chantal Nobs, a PhD student at the University of Brighton, was one of 12 women selected to participate in the Soapbox Science London event on London’s Southbank.
Her session ‘Nuclear physics: Exploring the centre of the atom and harnessing its potential’ involved discussing her work and her experiences as a female scientist.

Chantal said she was impressed with the reaction from members of the public. One said: “Now, not only do I know what it means, but I know that women can do it.”


The key aim was to help eliminate gender inequality in science by raising the profile and challenging the public’s view of women in science. In addition to sharing their research with the general public, all 12 women became role-models for future generations.

Chantal said: “Although I was incredibly nervous before stepping onto my soapbox I thoroughly enjoyed the hour-long session. As soon as I had introduced myself, out of no-where, a full crowd had formed around me. A complete mixture of young and old, male and female, some who knew all about nuclear physics, and some who had never heard of a nucleus.

“The best part of the event for me was the variety of questions asked, everything from ‘how did you get into nuclear physics’ to ‘how do we know whether we have created a nucleus if we cannot see it’.”

Watch video highlights from Chantal’s talk here

Can maths help treat spinal deformities?

'WHAT'S YOUR ANGLE ?' A NEW FESTIVAL SHOWING HOW MATHS RELATES TO EVERYDAY LIFE AT THE SCIENCE MUSEUM Pix.Tim Anderson

The University of Brighton researchers hope to help doctors better understand deformities in the human spinal cord by using mathematical modelling.
Dr Paul Harris and research student Jenny Venton, from the university’s College of Life, Health and Physical Sciences, will explain their work at the London Mathematical Society’s 150th anniversary Mathematics Festival at the Science Museum.
They will be presenting at the festival’s schools day on 27 November and to the general public on 28 and 29 November.
Visitors will be invited to become ‘undercover journalists’ to discover how mathematics helps us to understand the world around us and how it transforms people’s lives.
The University of Brighton’s research is part of an ongoing collaboration with the Brighton Centre for Regenerative Medicine and is funded by a grant from the Leverhulme Trust (RPG-2013-178).
A key part of their research is focusing on a deformation that can occur due to the formation of fluid-filled cavities in the spinal cord. Previous medical investigations have failed to find any chemical or biological process which is responsible for the formation of the cavities.
The scientists hope that a mathematical model will be able to demonstrate how the changes in the pressure of the cerebral-spinal fluid can cause the cavities to form and grow without the need for invasive medical investigations.
They hope that providing an accurate mathematical model will lead to improved treatments of spinal deformities.