Art of the Accident: Brighton Beach Photography

After deciding not to continue with my photography of marks made unintentionally and intentionally in the studio by students I decided to photography erosion and weathering in a natural environment where the effects would be more unpredictable. Above are contact sheets of photographs I took whilst at Brighton beach. The photographs document the natural weathering and erosion of the man made buildings and structures.

I believe these photographs were far more successful than those taken within the studio. From these photographs I am particularly intrigued by the close up photographs of rust that I found on the metal bars beneath Brighton Pier. The colours and textural qualities of the rust would be interesting to experiment and play with using printing processes. It may also be interesting to explore juxtaposing the textural and natural qualities of the rust with the cold hard forms of the structures they were found on, combining texture and linear forms.

Esther Cox

Esther Cox is an illustrator/graphic designer who works in a variety of practices, however mainly creates prints for fashion. She is professionally trained in fashion and textiles, but has worked in health and social care, textile restoration and a large range of other professions. Currently she sales a lot of prints for fashion, primarily menswear and kidswear, as well as stationery and homeware. Some of her recent clients include Marks and Spencers, Paperchase, Transport for London, Desktop magazine and Undo magazine. Due to her clients mainly being commercial most of her work is designed for spring/summer and autumn/winter briefs, and large companies will normally request the same colours and themes for each season each year, therefore a challenge with her work that she highlighted was that each season she has to find new and creative way of reinventing these themes. Her style is abstract, textural and focuses on mark making, and her creative process includes using painting, print and collage to generate visual elements.

I really enjoy the abstract nature of her work and her use of colour. Her work reminds me of the experimental work I used to create during my foundation, where I would cut up unsuccessful prints and paintings and play with collaging the elements together. This is an approach that I haven’t used since leaving my foundation, however after the talk given to us by Esther Cox I am eager to revisit it. The talk also encourage me to see that approach as a way of making final outcomes, whereas before I only viewed collaging prints and mark making together as simply for fun.

Vector Illustration

Vector illustration has been a topic I have wanted to learn for a very long time, and now with the skills I’ve learned through my visual communication projects and the software I have learned through my software inductions I feel confident to take on the task. Two inspirational vector artists, whose work I’ve followed for years, are James Gilleard and Mark Usimani. Both use vectors skillfully to create beautiful imagery however their styles are distinctly different.

The illustrator / animator James Gilleard is from London, England and is currently producing work. He has many distinct styles however his most popular are his very detailed vector illustrations. In Illustrator he will build up an image through the use of layered vector shapes, varying in colour and tone. He will also add textures to these images, removing the often ‘over polished’ look present in many vector artists work. From a distance you may not believe that these images were produced using vectors due to the detail and three dimensional form created through his style.

Japanese Food by James Gilleard, 2016

His also produces very abstract vector work. Since completing the spatial awareness project I can now see a clear link between the project and the work of James Gilleard. As well as using shapes, like I did for spatial awareness, he has taken it further by introducing colour and tone. I am eager to explore experimenting with more complex forms like those seen below as well as adding colour and tone and seeing what effect that has on the emotions and feelings conveyed through my work.

Abstract Things Series by James Gilleard, 2016

Abstract Things Series by James Gilleard, 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In contrast to his work is the highly polished vector work of freelance American designer / illustrator Mark Usmiani. His work compared to the work of James Gilleard is far more playful and child like. The content of his illustrations mainly focuses on fictional fantasy weapons and armour that he designs. This playfulness is also conveyed in his style, which consists of bright bold colours and highly polished bubbly vector shapes.

Loot Series by Mark Usmiani, 2016

Both artists use vector illustration effectively to convey different moods and feelings. When experimenting with vectors I feel it would be beneficial to experiment with both of their styles which would give me a broader understanding of the topic. I often feel mainly designers decide to use the more polished vector style, which personally I enjoy a lot, but being able to successfully create work in either style will grant me more flexibility if I choose to use vector illustrations in future university projects or industry briefs.