Screen Printing Induction



  1. Choose a clean trough with no damage that is an appropriate size (within the area of the mesh)
  2. Clip on trough ends
  3. Hold trough in the palm of your hands with your fingers resting on the trough ends
  4. Pour an even amount of photosensitive solution throughout the trough
  5. Coat the back of the frame first
  6. Start 1cm from the bottom of the mesh
  7. Tilt the trough until the emulsion touches the screen
  8. Progressively stand whilst applying the emulsion
  9. Stop 5cm from the top of the screen, remove the angle of the trough and carry on moving the trough upwards for the remaining distance to ensure no drips

Drying Cabinet

  1. Place screen frame side up on the ridge
  2. Coated screens at the top of the cabinet, wet screens at the bottom


  1. Rinse the front of the screen
  2. Remove the unexposed emulsions from the back of the screen
  3. Can use a rag to remove any emulsion that won’t come off
  4. Rinse the front of the screen again
  5. Use a window wiper to remove any excess water
  6. Put back into the drying cabinet


Screenprint Design

For my design I used a photograph from my transmogrify contact sheet. As our final prints would consist of 2 or 3 colours we were recommended to choose images that could simply be split into 2 or 3 layers, therefore I believed that the simple geometric forms and monochromatic colour scheme of this image would make for an effective print. To get the image ready for print I made the image grayscale, increased the levels and printed it onto acetate as a 300dpi TIFF file. For the next layer I traced the black forms from the initial image onto acetate, I draw these forms on roughly with black ink to create texture. For my final layer I made simple lines onto another piece of acetate to highlight some key forms in the image.


  1. Fix the frame into the jaws
  2. Screw the bolts onto the corners of the frame
  3. Check the snap and adjust as needed
  4. Attach squeegee, make sure it is in the centre of your design
  5. Adjust the angle of the squeegee for printing and flooding
  6. Register
  7. Adjust the table if needed
  8. Apply a generous amount of ink (printing ink should be 50% paint, 50% mixing medium roughly)
  9. Test print
  10. Make any adjustments
  11. Can use screen filler to fill in any holes in the print on the screen
  12. Print
  13. Flood after each print to prevent the screen from blocking
  14. Don’t flood on your last print
  15. Wash the screen, squeegee and any other materials

Introduction to Motion


Using some copyright free video and sound clips from the internet and Adobe Premier Pro we experimented with video editing during this workshop. Video editing had always been something that had interested me however finding time to make films had always been a problem, therefore experimenting with copyright free resources was a great way to expand my skill set without the pressure of creating resources and producing a polished final outcome. However we were given some tips to bear in mind in case we did want to produce a film in the future;

  • Save all components into one folder
  • Always back up, invest in an external hard drive
  • Be aware of how it will be be displayed e.g. projection, monitor, online
  • Components to control – tripod, light and sound

In Adobe Premier Pro we imported our assets (keeping in mind that the first asset we moved onto the timeline would determine what dimensions the whole project is set to). With these assets we played with unlinking the video and audio tracks, applying effects, adjusting audio, creating titles and exporting.

In the future I do not see myself producing films as they require a lot of time and effort and are not something I particularly want to specialise in but this workshop has allowed me to gain skills which may be useful in my future projects. As well as making videos Adobe Premier Pro could also be used to create animated graphic pieces, by putting still imagery and type into the software and then animating them I could create short dynamic pieces, this may be more applicable to my work as I can still produce motion work without the time and effort required to make film.