Semester 1 Results and Reflection

This week I received my semester 1 results along with written feedback on what I did well and what I can improve on in the future. My results were extremely positive, I passed the semester and was praised on my work. This came as a surprise to me as before the assessments we had not received any mock grades and we weren’t show any work from previous years with their accompanying grade, therefore I had no idea what to expect in terms of how harsh the marking would be.

There were two main areas highlighted as needing improvement in the future, luckily however they are both easy things for me to do. The first improvement is to include more day-to-day examples of work in my archives, for example collecting typography from shops I walk past for my typography archive. Furthermore in my archives I should begin to include aspects of my own personal interests regarding the topic of that archive.

The second improvement is to do with my craftsmanship. The presentation of my semester 1 work was regarded as good but the crafting could have been tidier. This was a problem I noticed just before the deadline for semester 1, I believe this was because for some projects I mounted my final outcomes early in the year when my craftsmanship skills were not as good as they could have been, therefore in the lead up to semester 1 I didn’t not remount this work and they remained rougher than work that I mounted later on in the year. For semester 2 however I intend to get all of my work ready for presentation at the end of the year, by mounting all of the work at once I will ensure that all of the work is consistent in terms of skill and materials.

You Say You Want a Revolution? Records and Rebels 1966-1970 Reflection

Essay

In December last year I submitted an essay as part of my cultural and critical studies module. This essay was looking at the how the information presented in text at an exhibition supports the key ideas and concepts presented within an object on display. The exhibition I chose to analyse for my essay was “You Say You Want a Revolution? Records and Rebels 1966-1970” which was hosted at the V&A, which looked at the many revolutions that occurred in the sixties and their influence on fashion, music, film, design and political movements. The focus of my essay was a series of four psychedelic posters by ‘Haphash and the Coloured Coat’, I analysed how the information presented in text supported the ideas of psychedelia, the influence of psychedelic drugs at the time, and how members of society in the sixties were searching for new ways of freeing their mind.

Today I was given by my essay along with my grade which was a B. I am very proud of this grade as it had been a year since I last wrote an essay and I initially struggled trying to structure and word my essay in a cohesive, reflective and analytical way. There will be another essay brief set in semester 2 and I am hopeful that after writing this essay and reading the feedback given to me, the next essay will be a lot easier.

Direct Feedback

“Good image analysis and very good essay structure. However, the quality of the discussions focusing on the chosen theme needs to be improved by drawing upon academic sources.”

In order to improve my essay it was suggested that I utilise my sources more. I listed books in my bibliography however I did not use them fully within my essay which will help to strengthen my discussions. Furthermore within my essay there were places where I included factual information but did not reference the sources.

General Feedback

After receiving our essays with personal directed feedback attached, we had a short lecture on general feedback and areas for improvement.

Improving on a grade B

  • Consistently introduce quotes and significant authors
  • Write an essay plan (think through your line of enquiry, how will you meet all of the brief criteria and the order of material)
  • Use images and your analysis of them to clearly support your line of enquiry
  • Make sure for every point or assertion you provide evidence in the form of a quote, reference or an image
  • Include summary sentences through out that link back to your line of enquiry / to the question you are answering (an introductory sentence and concluding sentence for each idea / paragraph)
  • Reflect upon the limitations and implications of the references and interpretations you are including (how the sources could be developed, include other sources to support your analysis)
  • Leave time to do a close read of your document to check for spelling errors, grammar and informal language
  • Caption your images to influence the readers interpretation in time with your argument

Improving on a grade A

Despite achieving a grade B I also noted down the points for improving on a grade A for future reference.

  • Be aware of your reader, make sure you are clearly communicating every point to your reader
  • Keep bringing your reader clearly back to your line of enquiry
  • Make sure you have a good bibliography, including a number of current references (the last year or two) and a range of sources
  • Clearly and consistently integrate images into your analysis to support your line of enquiry
  • Caption your images to influence the readers interpretations in line with your argument