Semiotics: Final GIFs

Touching necklace and licking lips

Touching neck and looking up

Touching lips and biting lips

Licking lips and playing with hair

Touching face and winking

Above are my final set of five GIFs, to play on each GIF simply click on the image. I choose these five GIFs as there is variety within each GIF between the two combined gestures, there is also variety between each of the five GIFs. Despite being variety between both of the gestures in each GIF they still run smoothly due to the similar lighting and positioning within the photographs.

These GIFs combine two different flirtatious gestures together, both of which would be subconsciously understood by the viewer. However the way in which they are combined causes confusion and distorts the meaning of both gestures, despite them both trying to convey the same message. These GIFs can be seen as a play on the idea of someone receiving mixed signals. Mixed signals is when an individual believes that another person is sending signals that they are interested in the individual and at the same time also sending signals that they are not interested.

Semiotics: GIFs

Biting lips and winking (click on the GIF to preview)

Touching earrings and licking lips (click on the GIF to preview)

Winking and licking lips (click on the GIF to preview)

3 of my initial GIFs that I produced in Adobe Photoshop. To create these GIFs I imported my images using scripts > load files into stack. I then created a frame animation in the timeline window and made frames from the layers. I also set each frame to play for 0.1s, with exception to the replaced frame which I set to 0.12s, before I formatted the GIF to loop forever.

I have decided to not include these three GIFs in my final selection as the GIFs as a set are too similar. Furthermore the replaced frames do not smoothly integrate with the rest of the GIF, therefore disrupting them and taking away from the content for the GIF.

Semiotics: GIF Photography

    

During my crit it was suggested that I further develop my self portrait photography of me re enacting gestures related to flirtatious body language. It was suggested I make a series of GIFs of me acting out a gesture, however one frame in each GIF is replaced with an image from another gesture, therefore mixing the gestures and the meaning associated with them. To begin doing this I reshot the photoshoot, this was due to all images for one gesture needing to continuously shot and have the same lighting, which was not the case with the first photoshoot. Above are my contact sheets from the photoshoot, each gesture is represented by a row of 10 images, which will make a 10 frame GIF. In the contact sheet in each row I have replaced the keyframe for that gesture with a frame from another gesture.

The gestures featured in the above contact sheet include: winking, lip biting, licking lips, playing with earrings, playing with necklace, playing with hair, touching face, touching neck and touching lips.

Semiotics: Photography Cropping

As influenced by my research into books exploring the themes of love and flirting, I have closely cropped my a select few of my photographs from my previous photoshoot. The photoshoot featured a series of self portrait photography, documenting me reenacting flirtatious body language gestures. From the series of photographs I selected those which best illustrated some of the main flirtatious gestures to experiment with. Above I have experimented with the gestures winking, licking lips and lip biting. In photoshop I explored cropping each image in a variety of ways and found that the more closely the cropped the image the more successful it was. By closely cropping the image you feel closer to the subject and therefore it is more intimate, this idea of an intimate distance relates to my earlier research into proxemics. Furthermore I enjoy how the photographs are closely cropped as they remove the subject’s identity, which not only help the audience to focus on the body language and not on the model, but it also allows the audience to easily identify with the model or apply the actions being shown to someone else.

Semiotics: Photography

 

I started to exploring flirting through self portrait photography, above are contact sheets showing me reenacting flirtatious body language. To capture the entire of the gestures I set the camera to take 10 continuous shoots once the trigger was pressed, therefore capturing the action of the gesture in 10 photographs. The body language included are as follow:

  • Lip biting
  • Licking lips
  • Winking
  • Rapid blinking
  • Raised eyebrows
  • Looking up
  • Looking down
  • Looking away
  • Touching face
  • Touching lips
  • Touching neck
  • Touching jewellery
  • Leaning in close

Semiotics: Aesthetics

AB by Aleix Font – Book exploring the themes of flirting and love. The photography features close ups making the images appear more personal and intimate. The focus is also on the body language instead of the people within the images.

Secrets of Body Language by Elizabeth Bitman – Close intimate crops of body language. Images overlap the text in places which draws attention to the images but also makes part of the text illegible.

OF LOVE by Saxon Campbell – A book exploring the theme of love. This book continues the trend of using close ups and closely cropped images to suggest intimacy.

Above is a range of research I did into books exploring the themes of love and flirtation, this was to look at how the topic was aesthetically conveyed. From my research it was very apparent that close up photography and closely cropped images helped to clearly convey intimacy and make the images appear more personal. Earlier in my project I began exploring proxemics through photography, I will now revisit photography to explore flirtation, however instead of using street photography I will be doing close up portraits.

Semiotics: Illusions

Think! Campaign by Jennifer Tulip 

Soulwax – Any Minute Now 

Continuing my investigation into proxemics I want to create work that would force the viewer to interact with the proximity of the work, therefore creating a piece that would communicate the study of proxemics through interaction. Above is my research into two different ways in which this can be done simply with black and white shapes. The top example has an image of a motorcycle set to a low opacity, this image has then had black bars overlaid on top. The bottom example says ‘Soulwax Any Minute Now” at a low opacity, but this time the image has had white circles overlaid on top. The illusion forces the viewer to move further away from the image for the image/type to be revealed, the lower the opacity of the image/type the further away the viewer has to stand.

Below I have chosen one of my previously edited photographs and begun to experiment with this technique. From my experimentations I found the lower opacity images t0 be the most successful, although this images work best printed at a large scale and sometimes are not effective viewed on screen. To further progress this would I would like to explore using the technique to make the viewer stand at specific distances from a series of images, each image representing a different significant distance in the study of proxemics, for example a personal distance and a social distance.

100% opacity image

90% opacity image

80% opacity image

70% opacity image

60% opacity image

 

Semiotics: Library Research

Whilst browsing photography magazines at the library I came across the following work by two separate artists. I believe that the work produced by Simon Menner relates to the topic of the semiotics of body language as in his work he is playing with changing the meaning of his images through juxtaposition.

Role Models by Simon Menner

The work of Stanley Wolukau-Wanambwa focuses on body language, specifically facial expressions. The closely cropped images strip the images of their context, however the context that these images were all taken at political rallies.

White Noise by Stanley Wolukau-Wanambwa

White Noise by Stanley Wolukau-Wanambwa

Both artists work have a strong political message behind them, which is not something I intend on pursuing within my own work, however the way that they have used semiotics to change the meaning behind images is extremely interesting and a technique I could utilise within my own project.

Art of the Accident: Group Critique

The feedback that I received during the group critique for my book was very positive, the tutors and the other students enjoyed the work that I produced and the feedback given was to help move the work on.

It was suggested that the book should be more monumental and could be printed A3 or A2, however due to printing costs the largest I could print the book for a reasonable price would be A3 spreads with A4 pages.

Another suggestion was that for the cover of the book I should consider using iron filings to actually rust the cover, however this process would be quite time consuming. I could also choose to screenprint with metallic ink or use metallic card and laser cut into it. There was also the option to laser cut into a metal cover, however attaching covers to the book may put too much strain on the binding and tear the book apart. I chose to use metallic card for the cover, online I purchased 300gsm pearlescent card in a copper colour resembling rust, this card is also dyed all the way through therefore when trimmed the edges would remain a copper colour and not go white. I decided to not laser cut into the card a gaining access to the laser cutter during this busy period leading up to deadlines across all courses and years was difficult.

For the final presentation of the book it was suggested that I contain the book within a thin metal box that needs to be cut into to access the book, however once again gaining access to the facilities needed to create the box is too tricky during this busy period, I would also need to be inducted into the workshops as previously I am not.

Finally it was suggested that I add text to the book, this could be scientific information about rust or a timeline of rust. I chose to include scientific information on rust as this book includes photographs from both Brighton and Portslade, therefore two very different kinds of rust are documented meaning two separate timelines would be required which could cause confusion if documented throughout the book.

Art of the Accident: Duotones and Tritones

Original photograph

Blue and black duotone

Blue, black and red tritone

Red and black tritone

Red, black and blue tritone

As suggested in my tutorial I began to experiment with colour. Using colours from the colour schemes I have previously created I experimented with creating duotones and tritones in Adobe Photoshop, which is a process I had never tried before. I liked the outcomes however I felt that the duotones and tritones took away from the initial imagery as the original photographs had a larger range of vibrant colours. Therefore from this I concluded that I did not want to edit the photographs from Brighton Beach in order to preserve their initial colour palettes.

Brown and black duotone

Brown and black duotone

Brown and black duotone

Instead of making duotone images from the Brighton Beach photography I made duotone images from my Portslade photography. I choose to edit these pictures as the original photographs were bright and vibrant with a yellow and blue colour scheme, this did not reflect industrial erosion which is orange and brown, these colours also clashed with the less saturated colours from my Brighton Beach photography. I find these edits to be far more successful as they remove the bright colours and make the images feel more industrial, as well as helping them to integrate well with the other imagery.