BSU Awards 2017 – Nominations for School of Health Sciences

Following the recent announcement by the Brighton Student Union (BSU) of the Union Awards for 2017, the School of Health Sciences (SHS) are pleased to announce that we have received the following nominations in the BSU Awards 2017:

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Society of the Year (Group)
For the society that has done amazing work to develop their offering for students.
They may have significantly increased their membership, created new events and activities and opportunities or developed strong working relationships within the University, the local community or nationally to enhance the experience for their members.

The Midwifery Society
The Brighton Midwifery Society’s aim is to spread knowledge and information around pregnancy and birth. They are open to Midwives, Student Midwives, prospective Student Midwives as well as mothers and fathers who want to expand their learning pertaining to this pivotal time in their lives. Midwives are the experts in normality and the Society aims to promote normal birth, in all its different incarnations, whilst building up a community of like-minded individuals with a passion for Midwifery.

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Best Feedback
For the tutor who provides the most helpful feedback on your work.

Helen Fiddler
Helen qualified as a physiotherapist in London. She gained an MSc Research in Remedial and Caring Practice from Loughborough University. Helen then worked for many years as a physiotherapist specialising in treating both adults and children with cardiac and respiratory problems.
She is currently programme leader for postgraduate courses in the School of Health Sciences, course leader for the MSc Physiotherapy and teaches on both undergraduate and postgraduate courses in the School of Health Sciences.
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The Union Awards are a great part of the academic year in which we get to celebrate the achievements and hard work of staff across the University and the Union. Whether it’s an inspirational lecturer or a student volunteer – every effort is made to celebrate the work of everyone across campuses.

BSU stated that, “There was a phenomenal response, with 630 nominations submitted across all awards categories for amazing people at the University of Brighton. It’s simply brilliant that this many people have nominated somebody that they think are fantastic!”.
The winner’s will be announced on the Tuesday, 16th May at the award ceremony being held at Komedia, Brighton.
Well done and good luck Helen and The Midwifery Society!!

Marian’s 100km night time ride to raise money for Women vs Cancer!

When most will be sleeping, on the night of 27th May 2017, University of Brighton, Academic Lead for Community Health, Marian Willmer, will be cycling 100km to raise money for Women Vs. Cancer!

Marian was diagnosed with breast cancer in August 2015 and shortly after had a succession of surgery, chemotherapy and finally radiotherapy in February 2016. Thankfully she is one of the lucky women to have survived cancer and as a result in her desire to give something back, she has decided to raise money for Women vs Cancer.

The Women V Cancer Ride the Night is a joint initiative that supports three amazing charities; Breast Cancer Care, Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust and Ovarian Cancer Action.

With over 4,000 women taking part, and a target to raise £2 million pounds, the aim of the night is to help raise funds for the three charities, raise awareness and get more women cycling!

To help prepare for the gruelling 100km bike ride, Marian and her biker gal friend are training incredible hard to help raise the money for this fantastic cause!  In Marian’s own words she has said that she is ‘feeling rather nervous about achieving this challenge and needs encouragement through your donations!’.

If you would like to help support Marian and the Women Vs Cancer initiative, please donate today via her justgiving.com page – https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Bikergals.

 

The midwives’ calling to help expectant mothers in Tanzania

Two University of Brighton student midwives are appealing for funds so they can use their skills to help expectant mothers in Tanzania later this year.

Second year students Amelia Hilsdon and Charlotte Hackett are already providing maternity care to the local community in Hastings and St Leonards and at the Conquest Hospital.

They now plan to work in Tanzania for two weeks in October to provide midwifery care to the community in Arusha city.

Amelia recently told the Hastings and St Leonards Observer: “We will spend time at the city hospital where around thirty babies are born every day. The visit is part of our third year module and is called Midwifery International Elective.”

Both friends are mature students. Amelia said: “We decided to go back into education in 2014, first undertaking an access course at Ore Valley College. We continued on to the University of Brighton to study midwifery and fell in love with this career choice after having our own children.

“We want to be able to give back to our community and to help other women and families at their most vulnerable time.

“It is an amazing job; we are privileged to be welcomed into so many people’s lives. The experience to be gained as a student midwife visiting a country like Tanzania is life changing.

“The trip provides an opportunity to help those in need in a developing country whilst also gaining new skills, learning about the Tanzanian culture and seeing how the hospital utilises the little resources they have available to them.

“Furthermore, we will return to Hastings with new skills and experiences to use in our ever growing multi-cultural community.”

Amelia and Charlotte are taking part in the 5k Brighton Color Obstacle Rush on May 6. They have a GoFundMe page and a blog where they will document their experiences until after they return from their trip.

Visit: https://www.gofundme.com/ace2017 or http://stmwtoafrica.blogspot.co.uk/

For information on University of Brighton midwifery courses, go to: https://www.brighton.ac.uk/courses/index.aspx?keyword=midwifery

Visit us 13th April to see PARO the robotic responsive seal with therapeutic benefits!

The public is being invited to view a robotic baby seal that is bringing therapeutic benefits to people with dementia and learning difficulties.

The furry Harp seal ‘PARO’, which responds to touch and speech, was invented by Professor Takanori Shibata from Japan and is being researched by Dr Penny Dodds, Nurse Lecturer Practitioner with the University of Brighton’s School of Health Sciences. She is exploring the introduction of PARO to dementia care within Sussex Partnership NHS Foundation Trust.

Professor Shibata will be attending the open event at Room 129, Mayfield House on the university’s Falmer Campus, Brighton, between 9am and 4.30pm on Thursday (13 April).

Also attending will be Professor James Barilla, the USA naturalist who has written a book on robots inspired by nature. Dr Dodds will introduce PARO and Age UK representatives will speak on how the robotic seal has been received by day centre visitors.

Don’t miss out – Email P.Dodds@brighton.ac.uk to book your place now.

Are going to taster days worth it? What about one in podiatry?!

Last Thursday, a group of 6th form students from West Sussex, visited University of Brighton Leaf Hospital for a taster day to understand what Podiatry is and whether it is something that they would consider as a career.

So what is Podiatry?

It would appear that the common understanding of podiatry is that it’s all about ‘treating ingrown toe nails and bunions’.

However judging by some of the feedback below, the 6th form student reactions were positively fantastic, and suggests that there is more to this subject than meets the eye!

“I’ll be honest saying it’s the best taster I have done so far. The content was well chosen, as well as the subject discussed. I loved the clinical part, such a great experience that I will share with my peers. Your students make a big difference compared to the students I have met in the past. Thank you all”.

“I heard about Podiatry before but I had little knowledge about it actually. It’s actually better than I thought it was, the sessions were pretty good”.

 “I like the idea of studying this course and the sessions have made me want to explore this further”

Split into two groups, the 6th form group took part in a number of interactive sessions to see first-hand and gain a flavour of what ‘is’ involved in podiatry.

Shadowing clinical sessions

First on the list was the University of Brighton Leaf Hospital NHS clinic. As the group went round the clinic and shadowed the 3rd year podiatry students, there were clear reactions of surprise that real life NHS patients were being treated.

They were told that University of Brighton students that study a podiatry degree have numerous ‘in-house clinical placement’ opportunities at Leaf Hospital to ‘practice what they learn’,  plus they get to undertake a further two x 3 week placements held externally at NHS Trusts. With this level of experience, it comes as no surprise that the University of Brighton are seen by many, as being ‘leaders in the field of podiatry’!

The opportunity to have an in-house facility such as the Leaf Hospital is unique to University of Brighton. It ensures that podiatry students gain hands-on experience very early in their first year, whilst being supported by the close knit team of teaching staff that are always on hand to give their advice and guidance.

In fact, students on the podiatry course will accumulate 1,000 hours of clinical practice giving essential experience of working with NHS patients and manage their own caseload before they quality as a podiatrist!

As the 6th form group went round clinic, it was obvious that for the many patients being treated, they were more than happy for the podiatry students to practice what they have learnt. They were happy to chat and were full of praise about the levels of care and professionalism that they were receiving from the University’s podiatry students.

So ‘is’ podiatry all about ‘treating ingrown toe nails and bunions’?

Well it certainly is about some of that, but actually podiatrists are specialist health professionals who care for all kinds of patients with foot and lower limb complaints.  They help patients maintain their health and wellbeing through a variety of podiatric treatment, including minor surgery, orthotics, exercise and education.

A lot of the students commented that they were surprised at the wide range of ages and conditions of people being treated; from young children with foot development issues, to those with diabetes, to older people that may have circulation or arthritic conditions.

“I feel I have a lot better understanding of the podiatry course and I really enjoyed talking to the students about their course and opportunities within the course”.

Anatomy session

Students were then taken to the Anatomy Lab to have a closer look at the anatomy. There was ample opportunity to ask a number of questions to develop their knowledge and understanding of the human body.  For many who have studied biology, and who are interested in a career in health, it was an ideal opportunity to gain a greater understanding of the lower limbs, anatomy and physiology.

“The day gave a good insight into an area where the students and I knew nothing of. Every session was paced correctly. Seeing the anatomy lab was excellent”.

Personal statement – advice and guidance session

The third session helped guide students through the UCAS application process, and help them identify what admissions tutors are looking for when they are looking at applications.

With guidance, students were able to look at their best qualities and skillset to identify how these skills can be best demonstrated in their personal statements. With this advice and guidance the students then worked through a personal statement workshop.

“I loved the help with the personal statement and how to apply, as this has never been explained before”.

Interactive practical session

The day ended with a fun, interactive, practical session by Graeme Hadlow, University of Brighton Podiatry Graduate and current Podiatry practitioner, who specialises in ‘Musculoskeletal’ areas such as joints, bones, tendons and nerves.  He gave a general overview of podiatry and how podiatrists play a crucial role in caring for those with foot and lower limb complaints.

With a few brave students taking their shoes and socks off to bare their feet for others to observe; students had the opportunity to carry out a couple of assessments, discuss symptoms, their effects and treatment!

The impact of the podiatrist to the patient’s wellbeing

What seemed to strike a few of the students was the impact that podiatrists had on a patient’s over all wellbeing, incorporating emotional, physical, and practical considerations.

Where patients may have underlying and complicated health issues, in extreme cases this can lead to severe pain, infection, circulation issues and lack of mobility. This lack of mobility can lead to lack of independence, low self-confidence and self-esteem, depression, and in some cases these issues can lead to loss of employment and therefore detrimental financial implications.

Discussion was had around this and the impact that podiatrists have on their patient’s lives in helping prevent the above. They are there to treat the conditions, manage the pain, provide advice and with their empathetic approach help patients feel secure and cared for.

So what are the career prospects for graduate podiatrists?

With an ever increasing demand for podiatrists, which is partly due to an emphasis on health and fitness, an ageing population, and an increase of chronic diseases such as diabetes, there are plenty of opportunities for graduate podiatrists once they graduate. With opportunities within the NHS and in the private sector, there are lots of options to study further, specialise in certain areas, and set up their own business! For further information check out the Careers in Podiatry website here.

So is it ‘one foot at a time’ or ‘leaps ahead’ for our 6th form students?

From the feedback given, the 6th form students all agreed that prior to the taster day  they did not about podiatry.

However, all of those that had responded had strongly agreed that the taster day had given them a good understanding of podiatry, with over 50% saying that they would consider studying podiatry at University!

So to summarise – if you are a naturally caring person, thinking about going to University and studying a professional career in health science, why not consider podiatry? The opportunities are there – it’s upto you to grab them!

For further information on our degree in podiatry and how to apply click here.

If you are interested in attending one of our podiatry taster sessions contact Vicky Johnson by e-mail on V.Johnson3@brighton.ac.uk.

 

Podiatry graduate Kerry Brown wins College of Podiatry award!

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University of Brighton BSc Podiatry graduate Kerry Brown has won the inaugural College of Podiatry End of Year Report award for 2016.  This national competition is for all final year students and seeks to reward the best research report across the UK.

Her work ‘Does foot posture influence forefoot plantar pressures when conducting a single leg heel raise test? A quantitative prospective research study’, was supervised by Dr Beverley Durrant, lecturer in the university’s School of Health Sciences.

Fellow alumni Harriet Goodfellow and Penny Raeside worked with Kerry on data gathering. The work demonstrated that plantar pressures during a single heel raise are influenced by foot posture.

A single leg heel raise is a common clinical test for tendon disorders in the leg and this lays the foundation for further work to establish the relationship between forefoot loading patterns and tendon dysfunction.

Kerry, awarded a BSc(Hons) Podiatry last year, said: “I am extremely honoured to be the first recipient of this award, and thank the College of Podiatry for showcasing the value of undergraduate research skills in our development as competent clinicians. I’d also like to thank Dr Durrant and the whole Podiatry staff team for their excellent teaching and support on the final year project and indeed throughout our degree.”

Kerry’s work is scheduled to be published in the peer-reviewed journal Podiatry Now, in May.

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If you are interested in a rewarding career in podiatry, then please have a look at our BSc Podiatry, MSc Podiatry Pre-Reg and Msc Podiatry Courses.

Ranked 3rd for Health Professionals in the Guardian University Guide 2017,  we look forward to seeing you soon!

Great feedback and a real buzz on the Nursing Career Open Day!

Third year students had a great opportunity to meet potential employers at our recent Nursing Career Day held at the Checkland Building, Falmer site.

With over 16 NHS healthcare trusts and a number of private healthcare providers from local regional areas, it was a great networking opportunity for University of Brighton nursing students, staff and our partnership colleagues.

Helen Stanley, Academic Lead for Nursing for the School of Health Sciences, was incredibly pleased and summarised the day:

“The first Nursing Careers Day was a great success today and it was a great privilege to lead the team in the planning and implementation of this event. We had excellent evaluations from the students and very positive feedback from the 16 trusts and other healthcare providers. They all want to get involved in future events, with positive networking contacts for teaching and placement opportunities.

The nursing students really valued the opportunity to hear about our Preceptorship work and our research on resilience . There was also plenty of opportunity to engage with our University Careers Service who provided advice on interview techniques, top tips for securing posts, CPE/PG and Community educational opportunities.  Students were able to talk to local employers face to face about future careers and preceptorship programmes offered. There was such dedication to attending the event that some students even came in from night duty to attend!

The team all worked really hard to make it such a brilliant day and Adam Edgar, Programme Administrator, was a real star with the admin, parking and all day support.”

It was great to hear the many comments from partners speaking so highly about how our students were incredibly enthusiastic, and how positively engaged they were.

With such fabulous feedback from everyone, we look forward to running the careers day again later in the year.  Further details will follow soon.

Should you be interested in a rewarding career in nursing, then join our winning team today and apply for one of our nursing courses.

 

Let’s share the benefit …of Occupational Therapy!

It’s not every day that you can say that your blog has had over 36,000 views from different corners of the world, however it is clear that this lady is exceptional, and she deserves every bit of recognition!

Cancer survivor Alice McGarvie is spreading the word worldwide on the benefits of occupational therapy (OT) – and her message has gone viral.

The University of Brighton graduate’s blog is being hailed as one of the clearest explanations of the benefits of Occupational Therapy.

Having graduated last year with an MSc in Occupational Therapy, Alice now runs her own practice offering OT and ‘harp therapy’, using the ancient instrument to provide “a soothing and calming sound” as therapy.

Her career was boosted when she shared in £10,000 prize money from the university’s enterprise programme beepurple for entrepreneurial students and graduates, a scheme funded by Santander Universities.

Alice last year underwent surgery for breast cancer and afterwards found herself providing OT to herself: “I was unable to run, so I had to adapt and substitute running with walking. I could not reach or lift things so again I had to adapt by placing things in reach, and getting help with the heavy stuff. I was fatigued so I had to learn to pace myself throughout the day and I had trouble sleeping so I developed a good sleep hygiene routine.

“I was being my own occupational therapist, making adaptations to the way I do things and to my environment to enable me to live life my way, and continue doing my occupations.

“This is what occupational therapists do, we treat the person, not the diagnosis…”

Tania Wiseman, Alice’s OT course leader at the university, said: “Alice has been able to explain Occupational Therapy in a way that has attracted some of the world’s most renowned therapists. She is quite remarkable.”

In helping to create further awareness about this therapy and help others understand why it’s important – let’s continue to share the benefit of OT. With over 36,000 views – wouldn’t it be amazing if we could help her reach 50,000 views?!

Read and share Alice’s blog now, to help raise awareness about OT, and how this contributed to Alice’s amazing and inspirational journey.

For more information on related courses at the University of Brighton click here.

Joanna Woollard wins ‘Clinician of the Year Award’ at the Oscars!

Pardon the pun – but University of Brighton Podiatry students are literally ‘one foot ahead of the rest!’…

It’s not every day that you can say that you have been to the Oscars, picked up your very own award and rubbed shoulders with Olympic hurdles silver medallist and former world champion Colin Jackson CBE!

However Joanna Woollard, University of Brighton 2016 graduate Masters in Podiatry with Diabetes did just that, when she was awarded ‘Clinician of Year Award’ at the recent Annual 2017 Royal Free Foundation Trust event.

From left to right: Robin Woolfson, Divisional Director of Transplant and Specialist Services, Colin Jackson CBE, Joanna, and Dominic Dodd, Trust Chairman.

The Trust gives its own ‘Oscars’ to recognise “individuals, teams or services that have made an exceptional contribution to the trust and an outstanding difference to the care and wellbeing of our patients, their carers or our staff”.

Joanna, who has returned to the university to give guest lectures, said: “I started thinking about podiatry as a possible career after it was recommended to me by a tutor at college. I was looking at ways of getting into healthcare and he said that it was an interesting, growing specialty that needed more people to take it up.

“He was right. Since finishing my undergraduate degree I’ve progressed fairly quickly in my career and there is a lot of funding for education and development, which has allowed me to do a Masters in podiatry.

“In podiatry you have to build experience in the community before you get a job in a hospital, so after leaving university I worked as a community podiatrist in Greenwich before joining the Royal Free as a vascular podiatrist in 2012.

“It’s a great team to be part of. Among the wound care, vascular and infectious diseases teams everyone is an equal partner. Every therapist, nurse, medic works really well together, so it’s a nice environment. That’s not something you get everywhere.”

Joanna said of her Masters course: “I loved it. I made some really good friends there and it was such a great course. I always recommend it to my students – it was a very good, sensible, clinical-focussed Msc.”

If you are interested in studying a health course where you can really make an impact to other people’s lives and open up numerous and interesting career opportunities, then study Podiatry today.  For further information and to ‘take that first step’, visit here.

The Man with Nothing

Football is helping refugees cope with the misery of camp life in Dunkirk, according to University of Brighton graduate Daniel Mansaray who spent time living with one refugee in his wooden shack.

Daniel has written a blog telling how the refugee Zayran (not his real name) fled his native Iraq after being attacked by terrorists for refusing to become a suicide bomber.

Daniel, who graduated last year with a BA(Hons) in Physiotherapy, wrote: “Refugees have been through unimaginable pain and suffering and activities like football can be used as an outlet for them. Zayran, for example, had little to no interest in football and yet it was evident it had a strong impact on him. Understandably, football will always have its limitations as to how much it can influence someone. But as long as it is having some sort of influence, no matter how big or small then it is invaluable.”

Zayran said: “When I go to football my body and mind feel happy and free. All refugees are sad. Football is like peace. When refugees play football they are happy.”

A short non-fictional story about a refugee that i lived with.

Read Daniel’s account ‘The man with Nothing – Freedom’

Source: The Man with Nothing – Freedom