BSU Awards 2017 – Nominations for School of Health Sciences

Following the recent announcement by the Brighton Student Union (BSU) of the Union Awards for 2017, the School of Health Sciences (SHS) are pleased to announce that we have received the following nominations in the BSU Awards 2017:

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Society of the Year (Group)
For the society that has done amazing work to develop their offering for students.
They may have significantly increased their membership, created new events and activities and opportunities or developed strong working relationships within the University, the local community or nationally to enhance the experience for their members.

The Midwifery Society
The Brighton Midwifery Society’s aim is to spread knowledge and information around pregnancy and birth. They are open to Midwives, Student Midwives, prospective Student Midwives as well as mothers and fathers who want to expand their learning pertaining to this pivotal time in their lives. Midwives are the experts in normality and the Society aims to promote normal birth, in all its different incarnations, whilst building up a community of like-minded individuals with a passion for Midwifery.

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Best Feedback
For the tutor who provides the most helpful feedback on your work.

Helen Fiddler
Helen qualified as a physiotherapist in London. She gained an MSc Research in Remedial and Caring Practice from Loughborough University. Helen then worked for many years as a physiotherapist specialising in treating both adults and children with cardiac and respiratory problems.
She is currently programme leader for postgraduate courses in the School of Health Sciences, course leader for the MSc Physiotherapy and teaches on both undergraduate and postgraduate courses in the School of Health Sciences.
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The Union Awards are a great part of the academic year in which we get to celebrate the achievements and hard work of staff across the University and the Union. Whether it’s an inspirational lecturer or a student volunteer – every effort is made to celebrate the work of everyone across campuses.

BSU stated that, “There was a phenomenal response, with 630 nominations submitted across all awards categories for amazing people at the University of Brighton. It’s simply brilliant that this many people have nominated somebody that they think are fantastic!”.
The winner’s will be announced on the Tuesday, 16th May at the award ceremony being held at Komedia, Brighton.
Well done and good luck Helen and The Midwifery Society!!

Are going to taster days worth it? What about one in podiatry?!

Last Thursday, a group of 6th form students from West Sussex, visited University of Brighton Leaf Hospital for a taster day to understand what Podiatry is and whether it is something that they would consider as a career.

So what is Podiatry?

It would appear that the common understanding of podiatry is that it’s all about ‘treating ingrown toe nails and bunions’.

However judging by some of the feedback below, the 6th form student reactions were positively fantastic, and suggests that there is more to this subject than meets the eye!

“I’ll be honest saying it’s the best taster I have done so far. The content was well chosen, as well as the subject discussed. I loved the clinical part, such a great experience that I will share with my peers. Your students make a big difference compared to the students I have met in the past. Thank you all”.

“I heard about Podiatry before but I had little knowledge about it actually. It’s actually better than I thought it was, the sessions were pretty good”.

 “I like the idea of studying this course and the sessions have made me want to explore this further”

Split into two groups, the 6th form group took part in a number of interactive sessions to see first-hand and gain a flavour of what ‘is’ involved in podiatry.

Shadowing clinical sessions

First on the list was the University of Brighton Leaf Hospital NHS clinic. As the group went round the clinic and shadowed the 3rd year podiatry students, there were clear reactions of surprise that real life NHS patients were being treated.

They were told that University of Brighton students that study a podiatry degree have numerous ‘in-house clinical placement’ opportunities at Leaf Hospital to ‘practice what they learn’,  plus they get to undertake a further two x 3 week placements held externally at NHS Trusts. With this level of experience, it comes as no surprise that the University of Brighton are seen by many, as being ‘leaders in the field of podiatry’!

The opportunity to have an in-house facility such as the Leaf Hospital is unique to University of Brighton. It ensures that podiatry students gain hands-on experience very early in their first year, whilst being supported by the close knit team of teaching staff that are always on hand to give their advice and guidance.

In fact, students on the podiatry course will accumulate 1,000 hours of clinical practice giving essential experience of working with NHS patients and manage their own caseload before they quality as a podiatrist!

As the 6th form group went round clinic, it was obvious that for the many patients being treated, they were more than happy for the podiatry students to practice what they have learnt. They were happy to chat and were full of praise about the levels of care and professionalism that they were receiving from the University’s podiatry students.

So ‘is’ podiatry all about ‘treating ingrown toe nails and bunions’?

Well it certainly is about some of that, but actually podiatrists are specialist health professionals who care for all kinds of patients with foot and lower limb complaints.  They help patients maintain their health and wellbeing through a variety of podiatric treatment, including minor surgery, orthotics, exercise and education.

A lot of the students commented that they were surprised at the wide range of ages and conditions of people being treated; from young children with foot development issues, to those with diabetes, to older people that may have circulation or arthritic conditions.

“I feel I have a lot better understanding of the podiatry course and I really enjoyed talking to the students about their course and opportunities within the course”.

Anatomy session

Students were then taken to the Anatomy Lab to have a closer look at the anatomy. There was ample opportunity to ask a number of questions to develop their knowledge and understanding of the human body.  For many who have studied biology, and who are interested in a career in health, it was an ideal opportunity to gain a greater understanding of the lower limbs, anatomy and physiology.

“The day gave a good insight into an area where the students and I knew nothing of. Every session was paced correctly. Seeing the anatomy lab was excellent”.

Personal statement – advice and guidance session

The third session helped guide students through the UCAS application process, and help them identify what admissions tutors are looking for when they are looking at applications.

With guidance, students were able to look at their best qualities and skillset to identify how these skills can be best demonstrated in their personal statements. With this advice and guidance the students then worked through a personal statement workshop.

“I loved the help with the personal statement and how to apply, as this has never been explained before”.

Interactive practical session

The day ended with a fun, interactive, practical session by Graeme Hadlow, University of Brighton Podiatry Graduate and current Podiatry practitioner, who specialises in ‘Musculoskeletal’ areas such as joints, bones, tendons and nerves.  He gave a general overview of podiatry and how podiatrists play a crucial role in caring for those with foot and lower limb complaints.

With a few brave students taking their shoes and socks off to bare their feet for others to observe; students had the opportunity to carry out a couple of assessments, discuss symptoms, their effects and treatment!

The impact of the podiatrist to the patient’s wellbeing

What seemed to strike a few of the students was the impact that podiatrists had on a patient’s over all wellbeing, incorporating emotional, physical, and practical considerations.

Where patients may have underlying and complicated health issues, in extreme cases this can lead to severe pain, infection, circulation issues and lack of mobility. This lack of mobility can lead to lack of independence, low self-confidence and self-esteem, depression, and in some cases these issues can lead to loss of employment and therefore detrimental financial implications.

Discussion was had around this and the impact that podiatrists have on their patient’s lives in helping prevent the above. They are there to treat the conditions, manage the pain, provide advice and with their empathetic approach help patients feel secure and cared for.

So what are the career prospects for graduate podiatrists?

With an ever increasing demand for podiatrists, which is partly due to an emphasis on health and fitness, an ageing population, and an increase of chronic diseases such as diabetes, there are plenty of opportunities for graduate podiatrists once they graduate. With opportunities within the NHS and in the private sector, there are lots of options to study further, specialise in certain areas, and set up their own business! For further information check out the Careers in Podiatry website here.

So is it ‘one foot at a time’ or ‘leaps ahead’ for our 6th form students?

From the feedback given, the 6th form students all agreed that prior to the taster day  they did not about podiatry.

However, all of those that had responded had strongly agreed that the taster day had given them a good understanding of podiatry, with over 50% saying that they would consider studying podiatry at University!

So to summarise – if you are a naturally caring person, thinking about going to University and studying a professional career in health science, why not consider podiatry? The opportunities are there – it’s upto you to grab them!

For further information on our degree in podiatry and how to apply click here.

If you are interested in attending one of our podiatry taster sessions contact Vicky Johnson by e-mail on V.Johnson3@brighton.ac.uk.

 

The Man with Nothing

Football is helping refugees cope with the misery of camp life in Dunkirk, according to University of Brighton graduate Daniel Mansaray who spent time living with one refugee in his wooden shack.

Daniel has written a blog telling how the refugee Zayran (not his real name) fled his native Iraq after being attacked by terrorists for refusing to become a suicide bomber.

Daniel, who graduated last year with a BA(Hons) in Physiotherapy, wrote: “Refugees have been through unimaginable pain and suffering and activities like football can be used as an outlet for them. Zayran, for example, had little to no interest in football and yet it was evident it had a strong impact on him. Understandably, football will always have its limitations as to how much it can influence someone. But as long as it is having some sort of influence, no matter how big or small then it is invaluable.”

Zayran said: “When I go to football my body and mind feel happy and free. All refugees are sad. Football is like peace. When refugees play football they are happy.”

A short non-fictional story about a refugee that i lived with.

Read Daniel’s account ‘The man with Nothing – Freedom’

Source: The Man with Nothing – Freedom

Students can join the Olympic gold rush

The Rio Olympic Games have shown that not only has Great Britain has some of the best athletes in the world but also how students can take up top careers to help achieve more to medal successes.

They include: head of performance, head of sports nutrition performance analysis, physiotherapists, podiatrists, engineers and sports journalists. Continue reading

New Postgraduate Certificate in Education- ‘Transforming professional practice through Education’

 

A new interprofessional Postgraduate Certificate in Education is expected to start In October 2016.  This new programme has been designed to critically develop health professional educator’s knowledge, competence and confidence to a strategic level for their educational role at work, both in practice and academic institutions. The aims of the programme are:

 

  • To enable health professionals to critically develop their competence and confidence in a range of teaching, learning, assessment and evaluation strategies in health, social care and higher education practice settings.
  • To develop the in-depth knowledge and skills of health professionals with an educational role or interest in teaching and learning so that they may design, plan, lead and manage creative, considered, supportive learning experiences which meet the initial and continuing learning needs of individuals working and learning in health, social care and HEI settings.
  • To provide the framework for exposure to exciting and comprehensive experiences in teaching, learning, assessment and evaluation that will achieve the UK Professional Standards framework for teaching and supporting learning in higher education requirements.

The course can be taken full time over one academic year or part time over two academic years. Students undertake three modules (20 credits each) and the course is delivered through a blended learning experience with attendance of learning activities and workshops expected at University alongside structured `e` activity.  All applications are reviewed and shortlisted candidates will be invited to interview.

If you have a question about this course, our enquiries team will be happy to help.

01273 644644
enquiries@brighton.ac.uk

Contacts:

Channine Clarke   01273 643771   c.clarke@brighton.ac.uk

Tracy Szekely       01273 643947   T.szekely@brighton.ac.uk

Sara Hadland       01273 643873   S.Hadland@brighton.ac.uk

 

Source: Occupational Therapy newsletter – Feb 2016

Channine Clarke, Principal Lecturer and Tracy Szekely, Senior Lecturer

Japanese Physiotherapy Congress

In May COLIN PATERSON Senior Lecturer in Physiotherapy, was invited to Japan to provide a Keynote presentation at the Japanese Physiotherapy Congress in Sapporo.  Continue reading

Staff successes

ann-moore

Professor ANN MOORE

Professor ANN MOORE was awarded a CBE for services to physiotherapy. Ann retired from the School of Health Sciences (formerly School of Health Professions) last year. She is currently Emeritus Professor with the University of Brighton. She has been research lead for the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy since December 2007.

Ann has published extensively in peer reviewed journals and has regularly presented invited papers and keynote addresses at both national and international conferences. Continue reading

Occupational Therapy and Physiotherapy Erasmus Exchanges to Porto, Portugal

Physiotherapy and occupational therapy lecturers recently visited the Instituto Politécnico do Porto in Portugal on an Erasmus funded staff exchange. HAZEL HOROBIN from the School of Health Sciences, taught both undergraduate and postgraduate physiotherapy students over four days taking both seminars and practical classes. The students were keen to understand UK perspectivot-and-pt-erasmus-to-porto-portugales on the physiotherapy management and treatment of chronic lung disease and explore contemporary approaches to pulmonary rehabilitation and differences in terms of approach in relation to both advice and exercise were discussed. Continue reading

Congratulations to Ann Moore, CBE

I am delighted that Professor Ann Moore was awarded a CBE for services to  physiotherapy. Ann retired from the School of Health Sciences (formerly School of Health Professions) last year. She is currently Emeritus Professor with the University of Brighton. Ann was Chair of the National Association for Educators in Practice (NAEP) from 2007 to 2012 and is now President of NAEP. She has been research lead for the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy since December 2007 on a one day per week secondment. Ann has published extensively in peer reviewed journals and has regularly presented invited papers and keynote addresses at both national and international conferences.

Many congratulations to Ann.

Best wishes,

Paula Kersten, Head of School