There’s more to job hunting than meets the eye

Looking for work says more about you than you think, according to research by one of our postgraduate OT students. Marna de Bruyn’s research revealed how the process is full of challenges related to the job seeker’s identity and to navigating institutions.

Marna de Bruyn

Marna’s research for her MSc Occupational Therapy degree, has been published in the Journal of Occupational Science. Marna, from South Africa and already a qualified occupational therapist, was supported during her studies with a UK Government Chevening Scholarship. Her paper was co-written by her university supervisor Dr Josh Cameron, Principal Lecturer in the School of Health Sciences.

The study explored the meaning of job-seeking as a human experience and occupation, and involved in-depth interviews with a job seeker at various stages of her search.

The 55-year old volunteer had been job-seeking for three months following redundancy. Initially, she was searching for administrative employment but by the end of the research project she had abandoned job-seeking to pursue a year-long, full-time course in counselling with the future aim of completing a university degree.

The research showed how her understanding of herself and her identity influenced how she made sense of job seeking. The authors said: “This process included encountering threats to her identity.”

There was also analysis of the supports and set-backs she experienced during job seeking, some of which were in her control and some were not.

The authors concluded that job-seeking is a “rich human occupation” influenced by internal and external factors related to the person, their occupations and environment. Future research, they said, could build on these insights by considering the efficacy of these internal and external supports and how job-seeking varies across different cultural and social contexts.

 

Inaugural Access and Healthcare Conference success in Eastbourne

On Wednesday 20 September, we welcomed over 70 students to the university’s first Health Sciences Access and Healthcare Conference at our Darley Road campus in Eastbourne.

Delivered through the university’s Compact Plus Programme, students from partner local colleges benefitted from talks about applying to university, personal statements and student finance.   Student ambassadors from a variety of healthcare courses also talked about the courses they were studying.

Student ambassadors from a variety of healthcare courses provided first hand iinsight into their courses.

Students took part in a range taster sessions convering  midwifery, nursing, podiatry, public health, occupational therapy and physiotherapy.  A student ambassador who studies Paramedic Practice was also on hand to answer questions about this course.

Lee Price, Deputy Head of School said: “This was an excellent careers day. It was great to see so many interested and engaged people wanting to discover about work in healthcare services and life at university. These courses and careers are so rewarding for individuals who want to play a valued and caring role in our society, and we are proud of our current students who ran the day in partnership with staff; they demonstrated pride and commitment in their courses and future professions.”

Nikki and Tanya, 2nd year podiatry students led a taster session at the conference.

Find out more

 

 

Leaders of the future

Three of our health students have been accepted for the Council of Deans of Health’s Student Leadership Programme (SLP) to develop their skills and become leaders of the future in their respective professions.

Stephanie Mott and Hannah Griffiths, are both studying Midwifery BSc(Hons) and Sarah Cottington is studying Occupational Therapy BSc(Hons). Continue reading

The British Science Festival at Brighton

The University of Brighton and the University of Sussex is co-hosting the British Science Festival this year. The event, which is the longest, established science Festival in Europe takes place from 5th– 9th September and features an array of interesting events in an exciting daytime and evening programme.

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Come visit us at our School of Health Sciences ‘Open Days’ in July

The School of Health Sciences teach a number of health courses over our two sites based in Falmer, Brighton and in Eastbourne.

If you are thinking about studying with us, why not visit us to find out more to:

  • find out all about your interested subject area
  • talk to staff and the students who currently come here
  • see the campus and get a feel for who we are and why you should choose us!

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2nd National Conference for Occupational Therapists Working in Diverse Settings

The second National Conference for Occupational Therapists Working in Diverse Settings will take place on 6th September 2017. Continue reading

The midwives’ calling to help expectant mothers in Tanzania

Two University of Brighton student midwives are appealing for funds so they can use their skills to help expectant mothers in Tanzania later this year.

Second year students Amelia Hilsdon and Charlotte Hackett are already providing maternity care to the local community in Hastings and St Leonards and at the Conquest Hospital.

They now plan to work in Tanzania for two weeks in October to provide midwifery care to the community in Arusha city.

Amelia recently told the Hastings and St Leonards Observer: “We will spend time at the city hospital where around thirty babies are born every day. The visit is part of our third year module and is called Midwifery International Elective.”

Both friends are mature students. Amelia said: “We decided to go back into education in 2014, first undertaking an access course at Ore Valley College. We continued on to the University of Brighton to study midwifery and fell in love with this career choice after having our own children.

“We want to be able to give back to our community and to help other women and families at their most vulnerable time.

“It is an amazing job; we are privileged to be welcomed into so many people’s lives. The experience to be gained as a student midwife visiting a country like Tanzania is life changing.

“The trip provides an opportunity to help those in need in a developing country whilst also gaining new skills, learning about the Tanzanian culture and seeing how the hospital utilises the little resources they have available to them.

“Furthermore, we will return to Hastings with new skills and experiences to use in our ever growing multi-cultural community.”

Amelia and Charlotte are taking part in the 5k Brighton Color Obstacle Rush on May 6. They have a GoFundMe page and a blog where they will document their experiences until after they return from their trip.

Visit: https://www.gofundme.com/ace2017 or http://stmwtoafrica.blogspot.co.uk/

For information on University of Brighton midwifery courses, go to: https://www.brighton.ac.uk/courses/index.aspx?keyword=midwifery

Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST) – two day intensive course, Oct 2016

ASIST is a two-day intensive and interactive practice focused course designed to develop skills in order to recognise people at risk of suicide, and learn new techniques to intervene and prevent the immediate risk of suicide.  ASIST training has been developed and refined by Livingworks Inc over the past 25 years with over 1 million people trained all around the world. Continue reading

Students can join the Olympic gold rush

The Rio Olympic Games have shown that not only has Great Britain has some of the best athletes in the world but also how students can take up top careers to help achieve more to medal successes.

They include: head of performance, head of sports nutrition performance analysis, physiotherapists, podiatrists, engineers and sports journalists. Continue reading