There’s more to job hunting than meets the eye

Looking for work says more about you than you think, according to research by one of our postgraduate OT students. Marna de Bruyn’s research revealed how the process is full of challenges related to the job seeker’s identity and to navigating institutions.

Marna de Bruyn

Marna’s research for her MSc Occupational Therapy degree, has been published in the Journal of Occupational Science. Marna, from South Africa and already a qualified occupational therapist, was supported during her studies with a UK Government Chevening Scholarship. Her paper was co-written by her university supervisor Dr Josh Cameron, Principal Lecturer in the School of Health Sciences.

The study explored the meaning of job-seeking as a human experience and occupation, and involved in-depth interviews with a job seeker at various stages of her search.

The 55-year old volunteer had been job-seeking for three months following redundancy. Initially, she was searching for administrative employment but by the end of the research project she had abandoned job-seeking to pursue a year-long, full-time course in counselling with the future aim of completing a university degree.

The research showed how her understanding of herself and her identity influenced how she made sense of job seeking. The authors said: “This process included encountering threats to her identity.”

There was also analysis of the supports and set-backs she experienced during job seeking, some of which were in her control and some were not.

The authors concluded that job-seeking is a “rich human occupation” influenced by internal and external factors related to the person, their occupations and environment. Future research, they said, could build on these insights by considering the efficacy of these internal and external supports and how job-seeking varies across different cultural and social contexts.

 

Inaugural Access and Healthcare Conference success in Eastbourne

On Wednesday 20 September, we welcomed over 70 students to the university’s first Health Sciences Access and Healthcare Conference at our Darley Road campus in Eastbourne.

Delivered through the university’s Compact Plus Programme, students from partner local colleges benefitted from talks about applying to university, personal statements and student finance.   Student ambassadors from a variety of healthcare courses also talked about the courses they were studying.

Student ambassadors from a variety of healthcare courses provided first hand iinsight into their courses.

Students took part in a range taster sessions convering  midwifery, nursing, podiatry, public health, occupational therapy and physiotherapy.  A student ambassador who studies Paramedic Practice was also on hand to answer questions about this course.

Lee Price, Deputy Head of School said: “This was an excellent careers day. It was great to see so many interested and engaged people wanting to discover about work in healthcare services and life at university. These courses and careers are so rewarding for individuals who want to play a valued and caring role in our society, and we are proud of our current students who ran the day in partnership with staff; they demonstrated pride and commitment in their courses and future professions.”

Nikki and Tanya, 2nd year podiatry students led a taster session at the conference.

Find out more

 

 

Funding advice for new midwifery students

New student? make sure you subscribe to the University of Brighton MoneyMatters blog for latest advice and information on all things funding and fees for our student advice team.

If you are new midwifery student please make sure you read this post about the importance of being assessed correctly by Student Finance England – you may be missing out on extra support with your living costs.

 

 

World Congress Physical Therapists (WCPT)

Dr Hazel Horobin (pictured below) attended the World Congress of Physical Therapists (WCPT) held in Cape Town, South Africa last month. She delivered a platform presentation titled ‘A white physiotherapy curriculum?  Interpreting the experience of UK physiotherapy education through the perspective of critical race theory.’ and also a poster finding agency:  the response of indian physiotherapists to a UK delivered masters course. Continue reading

International Society for Sexually Transmitted Diseases Research conference (ISSTDR)

Senior research fellow, Natalie Edelman presented two posters at the International Society for Sexually Transmitted Diseases Research (ISSTDR) conference in Rio last month (July).

Right is a photo of Natalie with one of her posters which looked at statistical interactions in the association between substance use and report of multiple sexual partners by women aged 16-44 years