Interview with an Environmental Science Alumni – Rebecca Cavlan – i-studentglobal

Alumni Rebecca Cavlan describes her time at university in the Earth and Environmental Science department.

Source: Interview with an Environmental Science Alumni – Rebecca Cavlan – i-studentglobal

Soapbox Science’s first visit to Brighton

Head down to the seafront between 1-4pm on Saturday 29 July and celebrate women in Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics and Medicine (STEMM) with Soapbox Science.

Soapbox Science hosts events across the UK and the world raising the profile of women in science – breaking down barriers and challenging stereotypes about who a researcher is. And they are coming to Brighton for the first time this summer.
Chantal Nobs, a PhD student at the University of Brighton, was one of 12 women selected to participate in the Soapbox Science London event on London’s Southbank in 2016.

Find out more about the Brighton event here.

Your country’s air needs you!

“Everyone has a part to play in reducing air pollution that is killing as many as 50,000 people every year in the UK,” says Dr Kevin Wyche, lecturer on our Geography BA(Hons) course.

He was commenting on BBC Sussex Radio about latest figures showing pollution levels in parts of Brighton and Hove remain above EU and UK standards, and how London breached its limits for the entire year only a few days into 2017.

Dr Wyche, who with Dr Kirsty Smallbone launched a £250,000 advanced air quality monitoring station at Falmer in 2015, said reducing pollution was a complex issue: “It’s politically sensitive – should we ban all cars from city centres? It’s not politically favourable for a politician to say that.”

All of us, he said, has a part to play in cutting pollution: “We all like to use our cars and we all have gadgets at home which use electricity which comes from power stations which are pumping out all sorts of different gases and particles into the atmosphere.”

The Joaquin Advanced Air Quality Station (JAAQS), opened by Brighton MP Caroline Lucas, is the first in the UK which can detect harmful nano-sized particles and their gaseous precursors.

Dr Wyche expects to publish its first year’s findings from the station in the next few weeks and there are plans for UK’s first outreach programme taking their work into primary and secondary schools. A website on the station’s work is scheduled to be launched next month. Continue reading

Award win

Congratulations to Dr Susie Maidment, senior lecturer in our school, who received the Hodson Award at an awards ceremony this week from the Palaeontological Association.
The Hodson Award is presented to a palaeontologist within ten years of their PhD for notable contributions to the science.
The Palaeontological Association was founded in 1957 and has become one of the world’s leading learned societies in this field. The Association is a registered charity that promotes the study of palaeontology and its allied sciences through publication of original research and field guides, sponsorship of meetings and field excursions, provision of web resources and information and a program of annual awards.

Double celebration!

There was cause for double celebrations for the Geographers at the University of Brighton this week following news of a further prestigious graduate award and confirmation of the University’s accreditation by the Royal Geographical Society.

BA Geography graduate Moa Eriksson has been named as the winner of the hugely competitive Royal Geographical Society/IBG Geographies of Children, Youth and Families Research Group 2016 Dissertation prize. This is the second major Royal Geographical Society prize won by University of Brighton Geography graduates this year.

Dr Rebecca Elmhirst, Deputy Head (Learning and Teaching) of the School of Environment and Technology said: “Huge congratulations to Moa for her well-deserved prize following the success of fellow graduate Imogen Fox earlier this term. For us to have two Royal Geographical Society graduate prize winners in one year is unprecedented in the sector, a fantastic achievement and testament to the hard work of our talented students and staffRGS_approved programme icon_1.”

And there was further good news with confirmation that the University of Brighton has become one of only 20 universities to have their Geography courses accredited by the Royal Geographical Society under a newly launched scheme.

Dr Kirsty Smallbone, Head of the School of Environment and Technology said: “The accreditation of our Geography courses by the Royal Geographical Society is great news.  As one of the few universities with such accreditation our students can be sure they are receiving a first class geographical education and that we put them at the heart of everything we do.”