New PhD opportunity!

New PhD opportunity : Effective Management of the Invasive Aquatic Swamp Stonecrop (Crassula helmsii) in wetlands

There is an opportunity for a PhD student with the Aquatic Research Centre.   Please apply using the following link

PhD Opportunity

The application deadline is midnight on 28th November 2016

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

PhD research findings taken up by leading humanitarian organisations

Emanuele SozziDr Emanuele Sozzi, pictured (right) with one of his supervisors, Professor Huw Taylor, returned to the UK this summer to celebrate the award of his University of Brighton PhD degree at our summer awards ceremony.

Emanuele began working with Huw’s team in Haiti following the 2010 cholera epidemic, where as a Médecins Sans Frontières engineer he was charged with finding a way to provide safer sanitation in the country’s emergency cholera treatment centres.

University of Brighton academics worked with Emanuele to develop these ideas further and he soon joined our school’s Environment and Public Health Research Group on a full-time basis to develop the research as part of his University of Brighton postgraduate research studies.

The novel findings from this work are now being taken up by leading humanitarian organisations around the world and have recently led to the school gaining financial support from USAID and the Body Shop Foundation to develop the ideas further.

Emanuele is now a postdoctoral research scientist at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in the USA, though he continues to collaborate closely with the Brighton team.

The complexity of microplastic pollution

Matt Turley picOur very own Matt Turley, PhD student at the Aquatic Research Centre has been on the news!

Matt was interviewed on Channel 5 news about the dangers of microplastics, following a report issued by The Environmental Audit Committee of the House of Commons. The report calls for the government to ban the use of microplastics in cosmetic products, due to the available evidence on the impacts to the marine environment.

Scientists from the Aquatic Research Centre at the University of Brighton are backing calls for a ban on ‘microbeads’ – particles of plastic used in a number of cosmetics and cleaning products, which end up in lakes, rivers and the ocean.

Matt, who is researching the problem, said: “Microplastics do not biodegrade, and so they accumulate in the marine environment and are extremely costly and difficult, if not impossible, to clean up.  A ban on the use of microplastics in personal care products in the UK is a step in the right direction to reducing further inputs of plastic to the marine environment and to begin to address the wider problems of marine plastic pollution.

“Globally, approximately 300 million tonnes of plastic are manufactured annually. In a single year, the amount of plastic pollution entering the oceans has been estimated at between 4.8 million tonnes and 12.7 million tonnes, and around 80 per cent of this is thought to be introduced through land-based activities.

“Microplastics are tiny pieces of plastic less than 5mm. Despite their small size, these microplastics have been identified as a significant form of pollution with the potential to impact marine animals and the wider ecosystem. Their sources are numerous and include particles that arise following the physical and chemical breakdown of larger pieces of plastic debris, industrial spillages and products, as well as household items such as synthetic clothing or personal care products. Continue reading

Train to teach this September

If you have considered training to teach after graduating in a STEM subject this year, this post is for you…

Train to teach and inspire hundreds of young minds along the way. Start your teaching career on a Geography train to teach course this September.

Tax-free bursaries and prestigious scholarships of up to £30,000 are available while you train as a teacher.The department of Education (DfE) website has additional support available to help you get started…

  • Read these five simple steps to get into teaching
  • Register to attend the next DfE online event on 18 July; which provides specific advice for new STEM graduates like you.

Or you can register an interest in our programmes here.

Get up to £30,000 tax-free to Train to Teach a STEM subject

Good teachers are always in demand but STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths) subjects at secondary school are particular priorities and attract additional support and higher levels of funding.

The teaching profession is a great way to make your degree, skills and knowledge really count. At the moment, tax-free bursaries and scholarships worth up to £30,000 are being offered to top graduates who choose to train as teachers.

Our teaching courses at Brighton are perfect if you have graduated with an honors degree or equivalent, in a subject relevant to the specialism. Or if you think you may need additional support we also offer subject knowledge enhancement routes (SKE) which you can do ahead of the teaching course.

We offer courses in a number of STEM subject areas including:
Geography
Biology

Our Initial Teacher Training Partnership is rated outstanding by Ofsted. We work closely with our partner schools to offer a wide range of routes into teaching (PGCE, School Direct Training and School Direct Salaried). We also offer you individualised support to build on your expertise to develop your capabilities to become an outstanding practitioner.

Specialising in a STEM subject at postgraduate level means that you will be able to take a role in the leadership and development of this subject area throughout your career.

You can find out more at the Department of Education (DfE) website.

Or you can register an interest in our programmes here.

Laura’s ship comes in

University of Brighton masters student Laura Clemente Campos has landed an internship at Shoreham Port.

She will be producing an ecology plan for the port and her work will form part of her coursework for her masters in Environmental Assessment and Management.

Laura told the Shoreham Herald: “When the port gave me the opportunity to work for them I had a look around the site and was fascinated by how many environmental projects they had developed.

“I like the port’s vision for the future, especially the objectives established in the environmental policy. For an industrial working site they have a very positive attitude to prevent, reduce and compensate for any impact they may make.”

Laura graduated in 2012 from Valencia University with a degree in environmental sciences and then moved to the UK. She first worked as a scientist’s assistant in the National Water Quality Instrumentation System as part of the Environment Agency.

She said: “The masters at the University of Brighton has specialised my academic career and provided me with more technical and practical skills. I have acquired a high level in skills such as researching, critically analysing data, assessing data and reporting, at the same time as facing real cases and solving problems.

“The system was totally new for me, and it was hard at first, but I am learning and improving quite quickly, thus I enjoy a lot. I have faced so many challenges through this year but achieving them makes you grow up academically and professionally.

Laura Clemente Campos

“The masters provides a really good qualification and skills to start a professional career, and it gives you opportunities to practise what you learn, through placements or internships such as the one I am enjoying.”