Green Growth Platform hits new heights

More than 300 jobs have been created and 70 new products launched with support from a University of Brighton green business organisation.


The figures were released as the University’s Green Growth Platform received a progress report from the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE), the Platform’s original funder.

HEFCE said the Platform had “met or exceeded” all of its objectives, set out when it was launched in 2014.

Zoë Osmond, Director of Green Growth Platform, said: “We are delighted to have successfully delivered on all of the targets agreed with our original funder over the first five years of the Green Growth Platform.

“Since launch in 2014 we have seen over 1,000 green-focused companies join our network, with more than a quarter of these taking up our intensive innovation, business support or skills services.”

Zoë said the Green Growth Platform had facilitated the following impacts for the “benefit of the regional green economy”:

  • 312 jobs were created or safeguarded
  • 71 new products, processes or services were developed
  • 100 students and graduates were placed with member companies
  • 102 University-business innovations or research and development projects were undertaken
  • £2 million of funding was generated for University-business innovations and research and development projects
  • 15 new green sector courses or modules were developed

Zoë added: “It has been a real pleasure for our team to work with so many passionate and talented businesses and to watch our members flourish and innovate as they create the goods and services we need for a sustainable economy.”

The Platform is about to launch a national partnership of university green business networks, called Clean Growth UK. It will mean green businesses can access facilities and expertise across three different universities.

Zoë said: “We look forward to forging wider connections and facilitating many more exciting opportunities for our members via Clean Growth UK which we will launch at the Futurebuild exhibition at ExCel London on 5, 6 and 7 March. Clean Growth UK creates a wider national network, linking the Green Growth Platform to two other established green business innovation networks, hosted by the universities of Liverpool John Moores and Portsmouth.”

The Green Growth Platform and Clean Growth UK will be at the Clean Growth Cafe at Futurebuild, from 5 to 7 March, stand D119.

Celebrating International Women’s Day

At the University of Brighton, we are proud to have an extraordinarily talented staff and student community – and we are committed to equality of opportunity.

To mark International Women’s Day this year – we invited some of our students and staff to tell us about the women who inspire them. Look out for Hattie Corke, Geography BSc(Hons)

Brighton scientists researching ways to protect 11 million people

The University of Brighton is joining an international research project to protect Thailand’s coastal communities from natural disasters which cause the loss 30 square kilometres of shoreline every year.

The £592,000 study will improve understanding of Thailand’s vulnerability to storms, floods and coastal erosion which affect 17 per cent of the country’s population or more than 11 million people.

Read More

A Wild Escape in Hong Kong

I was lucky enough to visit the Mai Po nature reserve in Hong Kong’s New Territories – a wildlife haven surrounded by over 20 million local residents.

Hong Kong’s Victoria Harbour is spectacular night and day

When most people think of Hong Kong the images that are conjured up are of towering skyscrapers, junks and ferry boats crossing Victoria harbour and steaming bowls of noodles slurped down with bubble tea in busy street cafes. Inherent to this vision is the hustle and bustle of Hong Kong life – the teeming night markets of Mong Kok in Kowloon, the frenetic rabbit warren of Wan Chai’s streets and the thrumming outdoor escalators of the mid-levels of Hong Kong island. As a Special Administrative Region (SAR) of China for the past twenty one years, Hong Kong’s nearly 9 million local population regularly swells with growing numbers of both domestic Chinese and foreign tourists, visiting the numerous tourist hotspots, temples and shopping centres. As a result Hong Kong is ranked as the world’s fourth most densely populated region on earth. Read More

You can now check air quality – online

The University of Brighton has launched online air quality data so residents can see which times and days were more polluted than others.

The service could help those with respiratory diseases such as asthma avoid outdoor exposure when levels of pollutants are at their highest.

The data is in the form of graphs showing levels of potentially harmful gases over the last 24 hours, seven and 30 days. The graphs can be seen at: https://bit.ly/2QwNHxp

The readings come from the University’s £250,000 Air Environment Research (AER) monitoring station at Falmer, the first of its kind in the UK.

Dr Kevin Wyche, Senior Lecturer in Atmospheric Science and Air Quality Management within the University’s School of Environment and Technology, and co-founder and principal investigator of the AER, said knowing what pollutants are in the air is increasingly vital.

He said: “More than 50,000 people die prematurely each year in the UK from air pollution-related diseases, costing the NHS around 16 per cent of its total budget. Knowing when pollution is at its highest during the day and what days are worse than others could help some people avoid exposure.”

Launched following last week’s World Health Organisation’s conference in Brussels on air quality, it provides five graphs:

* Nitrogen Dioxide NO2 – the main source is burning fossil fuels as in cars and this can irritate lungs and make diseases such as asthma worse. This, in turn, can lead to great risk of infections

* Ozone O3 – concentrations are often highest on hot, still and sunny days, and are a major component of modern ‘smog’

* Sulphur Dioxide SO2 – can be damaging to the environment and acts as a respiratory irritant, causing coughing and shortness of breath

* Formaldehyde HCHO – can cause irritation of the skin, eyes, nose and throat.

* Nitrous Acid HONO – can contribute to the formation of other pollutants

Dr Wyche, who is chairing a forthcoming Public Policy Exchange at an EC and ClientEarth event, said the WHO has reported that outdoor air pollution kills more people worldwide than road traffic accidents, smoking and diabetes combined.

Dr Kirsty Smallbone, Head of the School of Environment and Technology and is co-founder and co-investigator of Air Environment Research, said: “Brighton is exceeding air quality limits set by the government and it is crucial that we enhance our understanding of the relationships that exist between pollutants and health. It is also vital and incumbent upon us to share our knowledge and data with the public.”

The monitoring station is co-funded by the EU’s Interreg IVB NWE programme and the University of Brighton as part of the Joint Air Quality Initiative (JOAQUIN). Graphs and data archives are produced by Jason Bailey, Learning Technologies Adviser at the University.

The value of sharing your research

Dr James Cole’s research on Prehistoric cannibalism has scored one of the highest Altmetric scores of Social Science articles published in 2017 open access by the journal Scientific Reports part of the  Springer Nature publishing group.

Springer Nature report that his research paper was mentioned in 800+ tweets and almost 200 news articles and feature Dr Cole as the headline in their “Open Voices” campaign about Open Access publishing. Read More

Brighton researchers aiming to save the whale – and humans

University of Brighton scientists have discovered a more environmentally-friendly way of preventing man-made toxins from leaching into the water system – using living organisms.

Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), now banned by most countries including the UK (1981), are still posing serious health risks and are suspected of causing the death of a new-born orca which made headlines around the world earlier this year when its mother Tahlequah carried the dead calf for 17 days.

Read More

Observing nature; working with nature – an artist’s perspective

A Wetland LIFE Blog – Dr Mary Gearey

One of the many joys of working on the WetlandLIFE project has been the chance to meet, talk with and spend time with a wide variety of people who cherish these very special landscapes. In particular the ‘sense of place’ fieldwork that we are collectively undertaking explores the various ways in which these wetlands engender a very special relationship between site users and the wetlands themselves. Talking with these different users has helped the research team really appreciate the particular, and often unseen, characteristics of these spaces.

Read More

‘Ig’ Nobel prize for Brighton researcher

Research which quantified the calorific value of the human body has won a global award for a University of Brighton researcher.

The Ig Nobel prize, which celebrates unusual and imaginative research and runs parallel to the Nobel Prizes, has been awarded to Dr James Cole, Principal Lecturer in Archaeology from the University’s School of Environment and Technology. He received his award at Harvard University in Massachusetts, USA, last night (13 September).

Read More

Mineral better than bleach at fighting disease-causing microorganisms

University of Brighton scientists have discovered that a mineral is more efficient than chemicals in fighting the spread of diseases during humanitarian emergencies.
27 July 2018

They compared hydrated lime-based treatments of human excreta against more traditional chorine-based chemicals such as bleach and found that lime provided greater treatment efficacy. It is hoped the findings will lead to a reduction in the spread of diseases, particularly among patients and healthcare workers at Ebola and cholera treatment centres. Read More