Environmental Geophysics in Exploration Geology

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On the 30th November a group of students and staff went to the disused Sheepcote Valley landfill site to practise the use of field geophysics instruments as part of the third year Exploration Geology module. The exercise demonstrated how geophysical … Continue reading

An award winning dissertation

imogen-foxHuge congratulations to Imogen Fox, who has just graduated from our Geography BA(Hons) course for her award-winning dissertation!

Imogen’s dissertation on how she supported a friend with special needs won the Royal Geographical Society’s Social and Cultural Geography Research Groups Undergraduate Dissertation Award and £100 prize money. Titled ‘Meltdowns in the mud – a spatial, emotional and relationship approach to the experience of care in the micro-spatialities of Glastonbury Festival’ Imogen wrote an account of her experience in supporting her friend Rona when the pair attended the Glastonbury Festival this summer.

“I am in complete shock and disbelief about winning the prize,” said Imogen. “I feel extremely grateful for all the amazing support I received from both academic staff from my course at the university who have boosted my confidence in my own academic abilities and also my wonderful dyslexia tutor who kept me calm throughout the writing process.”

Imogen also praised the Sussex organisation which teamed her up with “my new close friend” Rona, Gig Buddies, which matches adults who have a learning disabilities to volunteers who have similar interests, to go to events together that they both love.

Imogen, now studying for her MSc in Social Work, said: “I question the word and activity of ‘care’ because that ‘care’ goes both ways and is often an act of friendship, thus defining mine and Rona’s relationship as a ‘muddy relationship’ which can be impacted upon differently in different spaces.”

Train to teach this September

If you have considered training to teach after graduating in a STEM subject this year, this post is for you…

Train to teach and inspire hundreds of young minds along the way. Start your teaching career on a Geography train to teach course this September.

Tax-free bursaries and prestigious scholarships of up to £30,000 are available while you train as a teacher.The department of Education (DfE) website has additional support available to help you get started…

  • Read these five simple steps to get into teaching
  • Register to attend the next DfE online event on 18 July; which provides specific advice for new STEM graduates like you.

Or you can register an interest in our programmes here.

Get up to £30,000 tax-free to Train to Teach a STEM subject

Good teachers are always in demand but STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths) subjects at secondary school are particular priorities and attract additional support and higher levels of funding.

The teaching profession is a great way to make your degree, skills and knowledge really count. At the moment, tax-free bursaries and scholarships worth up to £30,000 are being offered to top graduates who choose to train as teachers.

Our teaching courses at Brighton are perfect if you have graduated with an honors degree or equivalent, in a subject relevant to the specialism. Or if you think you may need additional support we also offer subject knowledge enhancement routes (SKE) which you can do ahead of the teaching course.

We offer courses in a number of STEM subject areas including:
Geography
Biology

Our Initial Teacher Training Partnership is rated outstanding by Ofsted. We work closely with our partner schools to offer a wide range of routes into teaching (PGCE, School Direct Training and School Direct Salaried). We also offer you individualised support to build on your expertise to develop your capabilities to become an outstanding practitioner.

Specialising in a STEM subject at postgraduate level means that you will be able to take a role in the leadership and development of this subject area throughout your career.

You can find out more at the Department of Education (DfE) website.

Or you can register an interest in our programmes here.

Join us at our campus open day on Saturday 18 June

Open days are a great way to find out about the local area and the campus where you will be studying. You will also be able to hear more about your chosen subject and talk to our staff and current students.
If you are thinking of beginning your studies in 2017, you can find out more about our campus open day and how to book a place here

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Geophysical survey reveals hidden Preston Park feature

Brighton Museum, the University of Brighton and Brighton & Hove Archaeological Society have completed a geophysical survey of Brighton’s Preston Park – and discovered a Second World War secret.

The survey, supported by the Friends of Preston Park, looked beneath the surface of the park to find signs of archaeological activity.

Brighton and Hove has a rich and complicated history that goes back thousands of years, into the Stone Age. Preston Park is situated in a valley bottom which has long been a natural communication route (the modern London Road follows the same route), and the surrounding area has links back to the medieval village and manor of Preston. Before that there are signs of occupation during the Romano-British period, with the foundations of a Roman villa uncovered in the Springfield Road area as early as 1876.

The Brighton team completed an initial survey in November 2015, with positive findings in the area close to the tennis courts. In March this year the University of Brighton’s geophysics team therefore returned to do a higher resolution survey of this area using a magnetometer, which measures changes of magnetism in the soil and is particularly good at locating metal and burnt/fired objects (such as bricks and other building materials).

Having processed the data from this new survey the team was due to share its findings with the public at Preston Manor, as part of the Preston Village Community Heritage Open Day last Saturday.

Jaime Kaminski

Jaime Kaminski

Dr Jaime Kaminski, from the university’s College of Life, Health and Physical Sciences, said: “The results are really encouraging. They show that, despite the extensive landscaping which has taken place in the park, some archaeological features seem to have survived.”

Andy Maxted, Curator of Archaeology at Brighton Museum, who helped lead the overall project, said: “We have identified a large rectangular feature, 18 metres by 40 metres, to the south of the Park’s Chalet Café and north of the tennis courts. Nothing is certain yet but we’re pretty sure that the feature is what remains of a Second World War water tank – built to test military vehicles.

Andy Maxted said: “These findings demonstrate technology’s potential for discovering hidden archaeology beneath Brighton & Hove’s green spaces. We would really like the opportunity to extend this project to other suitable areas within Brighton & Hove, as there is no doubt there is further archaeology to be found.”

Preston Park clock tower

Preston Park clock tower

Human geography field trip to Morocco 2016

Students in Imlil

Students and guide in Imlil

This year our BA Geography students jetted out to Morocco to explore human geography in the field. With teaching support from staffmembers Dr Becky Elmhirst, Dr Jason Lim, Dr Mandy Curtis and Dr Nick McGlynn, and deep local knowledge from expert guide Ibrahim, these 20 students spent five days in the famous tourist hub of Marrakech, and two days high in the Atlas Mountains in the valley of Imlil. Each day our students undertook different exercises in data collection and analysis, from detailed autoethnographic reflections to the Rapid Rural Appraisal techniques used in international development. Unlike last year the weather was hot and sunny – which just goes to show how unpredictable mountain climates can be. In this blog post I’ll be taking you through what our students got up to (in their working hours at least!).

Day 1 (Marrakech): Urban Social Geographies

Becky and Jason help students to understand the Place du 16 Novembre

Dr Becky Elmhirst and Dr Jason Lim help students to understand the Place du 16 Novembre

We left the university at 4.30am to arrive in Marrakech at around 10.30am – so by noon we were ready to survey the field. No rest for geographers! Beginning with observations at the modern-looking Place du 16 Novembre, we then moved on through the city to the quiet Cyber Parc, to the souks of the Medina before we finally ended at the famous Jemaa El Fnaa. Students began to question what kinds of spaces we associate with modernity, and how Orientalist geographies and the concept of ‘The West’ could be critiqued. The word ‘authentic’ was temporarily banned as we considered how geographic imaginaries influence what we take to be ‘authentic’ or ‘fake’.

Day 2 (Marrakech): Social and Economic Landscapes and Nightscapes

Nightscapes of the Jemaa El Fnaa

Nightscapes of the Jemaa El Fnaa

On the second day we returned to the Medina, where students undertook structured observations of key areas around the Jemaa El Fnaa. This time they were looking for signs of economic activity, globalisation and the nature of the built environment. We then returned to the area at night to see how ‘temporality’ can be vital in understanding social and cultural geographies. The square becomes even more active at night, with storytellers, performers and food vendors all clamouring for your attention. Consumption and the night-time economy were our focus here. And unlike Brighton, this was a nightscape without alcohol! Our students reflected on their own sensory experiences – how smell, taste, touch and sound can be as important in our conceptions of space as sight is.

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