‘Ig’ Nobel prize for Brighton researcher

Research which quantified the calorific value of the human body has won a global award for a University of Brighton researcher.

The Ig Nobel prize, which celebrates unusual and imaginative research and runs parallel to the Nobel Prizes, has been awarded to Dr James Cole, Principal Lecturer in Archaeology from the University’s School of Environment and Technology. He received his award at Harvard University in Massachusetts, USA, last night (13 September).

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New student? Hit the ground running!

To help you get the best start as a student here, we’ve put together some online activities called Hit The Ground Running.

Taking part in this programme isn’t compulsory and it’s not a test, it’s just a good way to prepare yourself for your studies and get to know your way around our online learning platform, studentcentral.

The activities will include tips for getting ready to study with us and help put you in touch with current students who can answer any questions you may have about the uni or your course.

You’ll be able to access this area the day after you enrol online, by logging in to studentcentral and clicking on the Hit The Ground Running banner on the home page.

 

The perfect job for Lois

A University of Brighton graduate has landed what many would consider the perfect job – working on a sandy beach in the Seychelles, swimming in the Indian Ocean and based at a luxury resort.

Lois Nippard graduated from the University last summer in Earth and Ocean Science BSc(Hons) and has been working for the past four months for WiseOceans, the marine conservation and education company.

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Research filmed for Channel 4’s ‘Britain at Low Tide’

University of Brighton scientists have been helping Coastal and Intertidal Zone Archaeological Network (CITiZAN) research the submerged landscape around the Birling Gap in East Sussex.

The research was been filmed for Channel 4’s ‘Britain at Low Tide’, the community-based coastal archaeology series, which was broadcast on Saturday (17 Feb): now available on C4’s Catch Up.

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Come and visit us this winter

It might be cold outside but don’t let that stop you visiting us this winter!

If you’re considering starting an undergraduate course here in 2018, why not sign up to one of our campus tours taking place during December and January and find out more about what it’s like study at Brighton?

The tours will give you the chance to explore the campus where your course of interest is based, view our facilities and talk to our staff and students.

Find out more and book onto a tour <link to: https://www.brighton.ac.uk/studying-here/visit-us/campus-tours/index.aspx>

Brighton research showcased in South Africa

Dr Mary Gearey, Research Fellow from the School of Environment and Technology, presented the work from three University of Brighton research projects at the South African National Wetlands Indaba, held in the Eastern Cape town of Port Edward during 16th to 19th October 2017. The Indaba is a prestigious event, bringing together academics, environmental activists, NGOs and government officials from South Africa and beyond in a forum for mutual learning and policy development across sectors, with wetlands integrity at its heart.

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Brighton scientists make breakthrough in India

Scientists from the University of Brighton have made a breakthrough in helping combat typhoid among slum dwellers in the Indian city of Kolkata.

Dr James Ebdon (left) and Professor Huw Taylor

Funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Dr James Ebdon, Reader in the university’s School of Environment and Technology, shared Brighton’s microbial source tracking methods with Indian and US scientists and successfully used the method for the first time to identify pollution of human origin in what is India’s second largest city.

Dr Ebdon said: “This breakthrough is an important first step in a three-year project to map environmental transmission routes of typhoid in urban India by combining novel microbiological protocols with social science approaches.”

Typhoid is a bacterial infection that can spread throughout the body, affecting many organs, and without prompt treatment, can be fatal. It remains one of the most serious health burdens in India, particularly for children, and is compounded by poverty, inadequate water supply and poor sanitation.

It is hoped that the breakthrough research by the Brighton scientists will demonstrate how typhoid spreads through poor urban communities so that more effective barriers to the disease can be put in place. The work in India is the latest example of the Brighton team’s efforts to support disease prevention in developing countries. Previously the team played a key role in responding to the 2010 cholera outbreak in Haiti and its advice was later sought by the WHO in response to the West African Ebola outbreak.

Dr Ebdon led the Kolkata work, which is part of the ‘Sanipath Typhoid’ project, run by the Global Centre for Safe Water, Sanitation and Hygiene at Emory University in Atlanta. He works alongside the University of Brighton’s Dr Diogo Trajano, Research Fellow in the School of Environment and Technology, who has made similar progress in Africa, with funding from the Medical Research Council.

Professor Huw Taylor, the University of Brighton’s Professor of Microbial Ecology, accompanied Dr Ebdon in India. He said: “This is a very exciting step forward for water and sanitation research at the university. In recent years we have become widely-recognised for the global impact of our work but James’ success in India, along with Diogo’s advances in rural Kenya, are now using Brighton’s practical knowledge for the benefit of those in greatest need.”

For more information on sanitation research click here.