Do Breast Cancer Survivors Respond Differently in the Heat Compared to Healthy Females?

Rebecca Relf, a Technical Instructor and PhD Student within our Environmental Extremes Lab is investigating the ‘physiological differences in females that have been diagnosed and treated for breast cancer compared to those females who have not’.

Why Study Cancer & Environmental Extremes?

Cancer is one of the leading causes of mortality in the UK and worldwide, with approximately 2 million individuals living with cancer in the UK, and 1 in 8 females facing a diagnosis of breast cancer in their lifetime (Eisemann et al, 2013). With increasing advancements in technology and treatment, the survival rate is currently 78% in the UK and rising (Cancer Research UK, 2017).

However, the literature indicates that following the treatment of breast cancer, survivors are left with a multitude of varying side effects which differ in intensity for each person. The most common side effects have been reported as;

  • Risk of recurrent cancer
  • Hot flashes
  • Night sweats
  • Persistent Fatigue
  • Decreased immune function
  • Depression and reduced quality of life

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School Children Learn about Altitude Awareness at Big Bang Fair!

The Environmental Extremes Lab (EEL) and Para-Monte joined forces on Wednesday 27th and Thursday 28th June at the seventh annual Big Bang Fair South East, held at the South of England Showground. More than 10,000 students between the ages of 9 and 19 attended from 200 schools across the region.

The event was part of the nationwide Big Bang Near Me programme, the biggest single celebration of science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) for young people in the UK. Arguably, the feedback (see tweet) from the son of our very own Sarah Smith (Economic, Social Engangement & Research Administrator of the School of Sport and Service Management) meant the most to Chris and Jeannet Savory, who set up Para-Monte to raise awareness about altitude in memory of their son, Adam Savory, who tragically died form altitude illness in 2012. Continue reading

Dr Alan Richardson Secures Funding to Support UK Firefighters

Congratulations to Dr Alan Richardson and the occupational team (Associate Professor Peter Watt, Dr. Mark Hayes and Emily Watkins) of the Environmental Extremes Lab (EEL) who recently secured funding to support their research investigating firefighter and instructor health.

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A PhD Student’s Pathway to Research Impact – Heatwaves in the Elderly

The research excellence framework (REF) provides funding to UK universities with the purpose to support the continuation of world-class research. The amount of funding received by a university is assessed against three main criteria: the quality of research outputs; the research impact beyond academia; and the environment that supports research (REF, 2018). A priority from the outset of my PhD (Heat waves in the elderly and the impact of acute and chronic heat alleviating strategies on health) was to achieve impact beyond academia. My aim was to provide evidence-based advice that the elderly could use to improve their health and wellbeing during periods of hot weather.

Kirsty Waldock (3rd year PhD student)

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New PhD Student – Swimming & Altitude Training

We welcome Ben Scott to our Environmental Extremes Lab, new PhD Physiologist with British Swimming who starts his doctorate, entitled ‘Profiling Elite Swimmers and Responsiveness to Altitude Training’. This is an interesting project with it being funded by British Swimming with support from the English Institute of Sport (EIS), based in Loughborough, but registered with the University of Brighton.  Ben will be supervised by Dr Jeanne Dekerle (Principal Lecturer, University of Brighton), Dr Richard Burden (Technical Lead – Physiology, EIS & Senior Lecturer, St Mary’s University) and Dr Karl Cooke (Head of Sports Science and Sports Medicine, British Swimming). We wish him well and are excited to read about the research as it comes out!

 

Heat Illness Susceptibility Questionnaire Trialled at Brighton Marathon

This year members of the Environmental Extreme Lab (EEL) returned to the medical tent at the Brighton Marathon to carry out heat illness prevention research. The purpose of this year’s research was to collect questionnaire data on runners who were suffering from a heat illness. The heat illness susceptibility questionnaire (HIS-Q) was developed by a team of researchers within EEL and the initial reliability and validity was completed within a controlled laboratory environment at the University of Brighton. The Brighton Marathon presented the opportunity to test the HIS-Q in a field based environment, where core temperatures are often higher than that achieved through controlled laboratory testing.

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Heat acclimation athletes successful in “The world’s toughest foot race”

The Environmental Extremes Lab once again supported athletes preparing for the Marathon des Sables this year, considered by many to be the world’s toughest foot race. Adding to the challenge of six stages, covering over 250km across sand dunes and desert, participants are required to carry all their own kit, have a limited water supply and, of greatest interest to our lab, do so in temperatures ranging from 30-50oC.

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Recruiting Individuals over 65 years for Hot Weather Research Study

We are currently recruiting participants who are over 65 years old to take part in a research study that is examining different ways to prepare for hot weather in the UK. Kirsty Waldock, Rebecca Relf and Gregor Eichhorn are conducting this research as part of their PhD studies and would like to speak to you if you are interested in getting involved. Please see the recruitment poster below for details.

This research fits into a broader research theme within the Environmental Extremes Laboratory of ‘heat waves and the elderly’ and what practical heat alleviating methods can be used to reduce the negative consequences that hot weather can have on health, particularly during exercise.

Hercule Poirot and Suchet Family Supported Before Inca Trail Trek to Machu Picchu!

In a nutshell, your advice was not only spot on, it saved us. I believe that if your words about “Headache+1” had not gone through my head on that first night, I would have toughed it out, and in Dougie’s (professional guide) words, I would have lost. How seriously? Doesn’t bear thinking about.” (John Suchet, 2018)

The Environmental Extremes Lab (EEL) hosted the Suchet family, including John (newsreader and musical host on Classic FM) and David (Hercule Poirot) Suchet, on the Saturday 17th March ahead of their trek two weeks later to the iconic and breath-taking Inca city of Machu Picchu. In collaboration with local altitude awareness charity, Para-Monte, Dr Neil Maxwell, Gregor Eichhorn (PhD student), Mel Stemper (recent MSc graduate) and Josh Pennick (current MSc student) carried out altitude screening on the six members of the Suchet family, before Neil provided education around altitude illness and ways to prepare for the trek to make it enjoyable but also safer.

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MSc Students Pilot Local Sweat Map Measures

Over the past few weeks, Dr Ash Willmott and PhD students Rebecca Relf and Kirsty Waldock, have helped the MSc Applied Sport Physiology and MSc Applied Exercise Physiology students investigate the sudomotor responses while exercising in a hot, humid environment (35⁰C, 60% relative humidity), replicating expected conditions for the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games.

Led by Ash and his current research theme of investigating alternate methods of heat acclimation outside of the traditional lab-based environmental chamber protocols, the students also assessed the efficacy of wearing a sauna suit during exercise in temperate conditions (20⁰C, 40% relative humidity).

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