Electronic and Computer Engineering Student Scholarship Success

Paxton, who design and manufacture security systems has announced the first recipients of the scheme which has been created in collaboration with the University of Brighton.

The Paxton Scholarship, which launched in November last year, offered the opportunity for students studying engineering and product design related courses at the University to win one of three scholarship places each worth £10,000 plus a 3-month paid work placement with the company from July 2018.

As part of the scholarship, the three scholars will participate in technology research projects at Paxton, that will then form the final year project of their degree course.

In November 2017, the company hosted a student open day at its new state-of-the-art facility, the Paxton Technology Centre, which was attended by over 100 students from the University of Brighton. The open day provided them with the opportunity to learn more about the company and the application process, meet Paxton’s experts in Product Development and Research, and receive hands on technology demonstrations of the company’s diverse product range.

From those that applied, 16 were then invited to an assessment day, where they undertook a series of practical tasks and interviews. The successful three students selected are:

  • Yury Johnson, aged 20 who is studying (BEng) Electronic and Computer Engineering
  • Laurence Budd, aged 21 who is studying (BSc) Computer Science
  • Sam Innes, aged 20 who is also studying (BSc) Computer Science

Commenting on the programme, Adam Stroud, Paxton’s Chief Executive, said: “I’d like to congratulate the three students that have secured the 2018 Paxton Scholarship. The Paxton Scholarship is a long-term initiative designed to ensure that we can secure the bright-minds needed for the company’s continued success and prosperity. I am thrilled at how the initiative was embraced by both the team at Paxton as well as the students and staff at the University of Brighton.

“We hope that for the students involved, the Paxton Scholarship will mean much more than just financial help.  Industry experience, without having to take a year out, will be invaluable to their development and help them to decide what career they wish to pursue.  We also believe it will continue to highlight the diverse range of roles available within the security industry and the opportunities offered by a growing and exciting business sector.”

Sam Davies, University of Brighton’s Director of Philanthropy & Alumni Engagement said: “Congratulations to the students and to Paxton for introducing this exciting and unique opportunity.

“We are delighted to have partnered with Paxton in establishing this new scholarship programme which provides our students with access to the realities of the workplace and the challenges companies like Paxton face on a day-to-day basis.”

New engine approach has cut fuel by up to 30 per cent

Scientists have unveiled new engine technology that will significantly increase fuel efficiency and reduce harmful emissions for heavy goods vehicles (HGVs).

Researchers at the University of Brighton and industry partners Ricardo have demonstrated that by storing and injecting liquid air into split-cycle engines, fuel consumption is reduced by up to 30 per cent while NOx fumes and particle emissions are also reduced.

The new technology would enable long-haul freight lorries to fully comply with inner-city emission restrictions, saving hauliers thousands of pounds per year. It also has potential cost-saving benefits for other diesel-fuelled industries including marine and rail.

Researchers say while the current trend for passenger cars is towards battery-powered vehicles, HGVs are hard to electrify. Batteries would take up more than half a long-distance truck’s payload, increasing costs and requiring yet more vehicles on the road to deliver the same quantity of goods.

Dr Rob Morgan, Reader in the University’s School of Computing, Engineering and Mathematics, and the lead researcher, said: “Even if a significant breakthrough in battery technology were achieved in the future, the strains on the recharging infrastructure and powergrid may still be prohibitive.

“On any sensible scenario, diesel-fuelled power generation will be around for many years. Our research is a potential game-changer.”
The technology, called CryoPower, realises a new thermal-power engine cycle – air is compressed in one cylinder, then heated by burning a fuel and expanded in a second cylinder. By splitting these processes into separate cylinders, the engine is more efficient and can be controlled to minimise toxic emissions such as NOx.

Read More