Graduates flying high at Gatwick

University of Brighton engineering graduates fought off tough competition to secure jobs on a newGatwick Airport Graduate Engineering programme.

David Oyegbile (left) and Quico Candea Lopez (right) with Vice-Chancellor professor Debra Humphris.

David Oyegbile and Quico Candea Lopez, both graduates of the MEng in Mechanical Engineering, secured two of the three places to work on construction of the new duty free area at Gatwick’s North Terminal.

 

Raymond A. Melee, the airport’s Construction Director, said: “We are in the middle of a £2.5 billion development programme here at Gatwick and we need good talent and high-quality skills to make it happen.

“The British appetite and spirit for aviation is phenomenal and these are the guys who are going to take it forward. I’m more excited about developing them than I am about building the bricks and mortar of another airport.”

Professor Debra Humphris, the University of Brighton’s Vice-Chancellor, met the graduates at Gatwick. She said: “David and Quico are a credit to the University of Brighton and the education that has prepared them for these roles in such an ambitious development. Our emphasis on the combination of discovery, knowledge and practice is at the core of studying at Brighton. Whether you are studying pharmacy, nursing or engineering, by the time you go into a job, you are ready for the challenge.”

David Oyegbile has taken up the role of a field engineer and is managing the works of Gatwick contractors. He said: “It’s about balancing time schedules with quality and safety. I love coming to work every day as there are always different challenges and problems to solve – it’s exciting.”

As a project engineer, Quico Candea Lopez develops the scope of projects before works commence: “My job is to eliminate problems before we start building things. I’m looking to ensure we have enough gas, electricity and water supplies, as well as the most difficult one – drainage.

“What has surprised me about working at Gatwick is the scale and pace of the place. You have to continue developing it while 115,000 passengers are going through it every day.”

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