Electronic and Computer Engineering Student Scholarship Success

Paxton, who design and manufacture security systems has announced the first recipients of the scheme which has been created in collaboration with the University of Brighton.

The Paxton Scholarship, which launched in November last year, offered the opportunity for students studying engineering and product design related courses at the University to win one of three scholarship places each worth £10,000 plus a 3-month paid work placement with the company from July 2018.

As part of the scholarship, the three scholars will participate in technology research projects at Paxton, that will then form the final year project of their degree course.

In November 2017, the company hosted a student open day at its new state-of-the-art facility, the Paxton Technology Centre, which was attended by over 100 students from the University of Brighton. The open day provided them with the opportunity to learn more about the company and the application process, meet Paxton’s experts in Product Development and Research, and receive hands on technology demonstrations of the company’s diverse product range.

From those that applied, 16 were then invited to an assessment day, where they undertook a series of practical tasks and interviews. The successful three students selected are:

  • Yury Johnson, aged 20 who is studying (BEng) Electronic and Computer Engineering
  • Laurence Budd, aged 21 who is studying (BSc) Computer Science
  • Sam Innes, aged 20 who is also studying (BSc) Computer Science

Commenting on the programme, Adam Stroud, Paxton’s Chief Executive, said: “I’d like to congratulate the three students that have secured the 2018 Paxton Scholarship. The Paxton Scholarship is a long-term initiative designed to ensure that we can secure the bright-minds needed for the company’s continued success and prosperity. I am thrilled at how the initiative was embraced by both the team at Paxton as well as the students and staff at the University of Brighton.

“We hope that for the students involved, the Paxton Scholarship will mean much more than just financial help.  Industry experience, without having to take a year out, will be invaluable to their development and help them to decide what career they wish to pursue.  We also believe it will continue to highlight the diverse range of roles available within the security industry and the opportunities offered by a growing and exciting business sector.”

Sam Davies, University of Brighton’s Director of Philanthropy & Alumni Engagement said: “Congratulations to the students and to Paxton for introducing this exciting and unique opportunity.

“We are delighted to have partnered with Paxton in establishing this new scholarship programme which provides our students with access to the realities of the workplace and the challenges companies like Paxton face on a day-to-day basis.”

New engine approach has cut fuel by up to 30 per cent

Scientists have unveiled new engine technology that will significantly increase fuel efficiency and reduce harmful emissions for heavy goods vehicles (HGVs).

Researchers at the University of Brighton and industry partners Ricardo have demonstrated that by storing and injecting liquid air into split-cycle engines, fuel consumption is reduced by up to 30 per cent while NOx fumes and particle emissions are also reduced.

The new technology would enable long-haul freight lorries to fully comply with inner-city emission restrictions, saving hauliers thousands of pounds per year. It also has potential cost-saving benefits for other diesel-fuelled industries including marine and rail.

Researchers say while the current trend for passenger cars is towards battery-powered vehicles, HGVs are hard to electrify. Batteries would take up more than half a long-distance truck’s payload, increasing costs and requiring yet more vehicles on the road to deliver the same quantity of goods.

Dr Rob Morgan, Reader in the University’s School of Computing, Engineering and Mathematics, and the lead researcher, said: “Even if a significant breakthrough in battery technology were achieved in the future, the strains on the recharging infrastructure and powergrid may still be prohibitive.

“On any sensible scenario, diesel-fuelled power generation will be around for many years. Our research is a potential game-changer.”
The technology, called CryoPower, realises a new thermal-power engine cycle – air is compressed in one cylinder, then heated by burning a fuel and expanded in a second cylinder. By splitting these processes into separate cylinders, the engine is more efficient and can be controlled to minimise toxic emissions such as NOx.

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Teaching engineers of the future

Leaping robots and flight simulation models were just two projects worked on at the University of Brighton by students from six schools.

They were taking part in this year’s University of Brighton-run Engineering Education Scheme (EES), nationally organised by the Engineering Development Trust.

 

EES enables Year 12 students to learn practical workplace skills during a six-month project with local businesses. Regionally co-ordinated by STEM Sussex, the outreach department of the University of Brighton, the scheme pairs teams of up to six Year 12 students and their teacher with a local engineering professional. Together, they work on real industrial problems for which the companies need solutions.

The scheme included a two-day residential workshop at the University when students were able to tackle engineering challenges and get a taste of university life by being given full access to the facilities at the University of Brighton.

Supported by company representatives and teachers, students will continue to work on their projects at school until the celebration and assessment day in April. Developing skills for project management, report writing, communication and teamwork form part of the scheme.

Taking part were Ifield Community College, who worked with engineers from Gatwick Airport; Bexhill College with General Dynamics; Oriel High School, Crawley, who worked with L3 Link and Schneider; Brighton Hove and Sussex Sixth Form College who worked with Mott MacDonald; and Trinity School who worked with Cory Riverside Energy.

For more information contact Rachel Day, Project Manager, STEM Sussex at r.day2@brighton.ac.uk

Bear in the air

Scientists here at Brighton carried a cuddly colleague with them as they boarded an aircraft for zero-gravity flights.

‘Captain Bright One’, our University’s teddy bear mascot, flew with researchers as the pilot took the plane on an upward trajectory and then reduced thrust and pushed the stick to achieve weightlessness.

The researchers used the European Space Agency (ESA) flights to test a ground-breaking system that has the potential to revolutionise the way heat can be managed – a crucial requirement for satellites and other space craft.

The research is being led by Professor Marco Marengo, Professor of Engineering. He said: “Due to the complete absence of air and the violent extremes in temperature in space, satellites, for example, require a thermal radiation screen in order to limit both the excessive heat from the sun and release of heat to the cold of outer space.”

His team is developing a novel ‘pulsating heat pipe’ system which dissipates heat using an evaporator and a condenser connected through a meandering capillary tube. They needed to test the system in weightless conditions to ensure it will operate successfully when it is used in outer space.

ESA has granted the team access to the International Space Station to test the system further and it likely will travel with British astronaut Tim Peake when he undertakes his second space mission sometime after 2020.

The news follows the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council granting the team £900,000 to develop the system further.

Photos of the Captain Bright One teddy were taken by research team member Dr Nicolas Miché, leader for the University’s Aeronautical Engineering courses.

For more information on the team’s research, go to: http://bit.ly/2jU7UZG

Rolls Royce flying visit

Automotive Engineering graduate, Lyndon Roberts, made a brief but brilliant visit to the University of Brighton in a Rolls Royce ‘Dawn’ yesterday morning. Lyndon is a liaison engineer for Rolls Royce and is currently being sponsored for his MSc Automotive Electronics masters here at Brighton. He showed off the £300k state of the art convertible before leaving Syed Rezwan (below) in charge…

 

Come and visit us this winter

It might be cold outside but don’t let that stop you visiting us this winter!

If you’re considering starting an undergraduate course here in 2018, why not sign up to one of our campus tours taking place during December and January and find out more about what it’s like study at Brighton?

The tours will give you the chance to explore the campus where your course of interest is based, view our facilities and talk to our staff and students.

Find out more and book onto a tour <link to: https://www.brighton.ac.uk/studying-here/visit-us/campus-tours/index.aspx>

Placement fair – Thursday 30 November

Are you thinking of doing a placement year in 2018/19? Come along to the computing, engineering and maths placement fair on Thursday 30 November from 12-3pm in Cockcroft Hall.

You will have the chance to meet employers from Rolls Royce, IBM, Nestle, General Electric, Marks & Spencer and many more, to find out about the placement opportunities on offer.

Why do a placement?

A placement year will provide you with solid, valuable experience for your CV that employers are looking for, plus opportunities to:

  • Network with and learn from highly experienced individuals
  • Work on live projects
  • Have the chance to use new cutting-edge technologies and equipment
  • Improve your subject specific skills and knowledge
  • Discover graduate roles for the future.

My placement at National Composites Centre

Tania Mahmood
Mechanical Engineering with foundation year

I am part of the Programme Management team who are responsible for the delivery of all NCC projects. Within the Programme Management Team I joined the Business Process Re-Engineering (BPR) Team. Being part of a small team who specifically work on the delivery of Business Improvements across the NCC, enabled me to work on over 7 large projects and support/lead over 15 small scaled projects across the business. The main aim of the BPR team is to align all processes against the NCC Strategy streams. 11 months ago I walked into the organisation with no understanding of how a business works. Now, the work with the BPR team has enabled me to draw links from across the organisation, capture and document it. I also learned how to apply Lean Six Sigma, APM Project Management, Agile techniques and how to work with the BSI standards to create processes. I strongly encourage Engineering students, especially females, to apply for an industry placement. The environment you work in and skills you learn set you apart from other potential employees and the sooner you get exposed to the industry the better. The skills you develop will make you more confident with the changing demands and environment of the Engineering industry.

Prestigious Fellowship for Morgan

Professor Morgan Heikal was today named as a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering alongside a glittering list that includes some of the world’s leading innovators and business people.

The Royal Academy of Engineering is the UK’s national academy for engineering, bringing together the most successful and talented engineers to advance and promote excellence in engineering.

Professor Heikal leads the Advanced Engineering Centre here at the University of Brighton. The vibrant centre produces ground-breaking research into internal combustion engines, thermal systems for ground and space applications, and the development of laser-based diagnostic measurement techniques, which are fundamental to modelling and computational simulation.

The secret life of the bicycle

Join Dr Derek Covill principal lecturer here at the University of Brighton, and cycling journalist and author Max Glaskin, on a unique bicycle tour of Brighton. Discover how science, engineering and cyclists can work together to make the perfect machine on this easy bike ride with regular stops for demonstrations, experiments and discussion.

Places are strictly limited so be sure to book in advance.

Sat 9 Sep • 14:30 – 16:30

Brighton City Centre • exact location to be announced
City Centre