Engineering Project Exhibition Wednesday 18 April


PEDThe advanced-level work undertaken by our final year students be showcased at the  Engineering Project Exhibition on Wednesday 18 April in the Advanced Engineering Building Lewes Road, Brighton, BN2 4GJ.

Each student will present their work on a poster, and will welcome the opportunity to answer questions and provide clarification on their projects.

Many projects are industry or research-based and cover a wide range of disciplines, ranging through all aspects of automotive, aeronautical, mechanical and manufacturing, electrical and electronic engineering and design.



Celebrating International Women’s Day 2018

To mark International Women’s Day in 2018 we are celebrating the achievements of just some of the academics working here at Brighton.

Our Women of Impact web feature demonstrates how our academic staff are achieving great things, working on the complex challenges facing society, educating and inspiring the next generation and making an impact in communities. The varied and diverse career journeys illustrate the huge range of talent that we welcome at the University of Brighton.

Dr Konstantina Vogiatzaki – safeguarding our energy future
Dr Konstantina VogiatzakiDr Konstantina Vogiatzaki’s research seeks to unlock the physics and push the manifold operating limits of our modern energy systems in order to increase their efficiency, regulate their fuel consumption and minimise their harmful emissions.

Brighton’s Robot Warriors

To mark International Woman’s Day in 2018 we are celebrating the achievements of our female students here at Brighton.

University of Brighton undergraduate students Katie Henderson and Jodie Nye battled it out against fellow contestants in the last series of BBC’s Robot Wars.

Katie and Jodie, both studying for a BSc (Hons) Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, are long-standing fans of the show and were one of the few all-female teams to have taken on the challenge with their robot ‘Ms Nightshade’.

Speaking about her experience Katie said: “It was an honour to represent the University of Brighton and also to promote female engineers. I worked on the design and Jodie and I collaborated on putting our robot together. I knew I wanted our robot to be different and something that had not been seen on the programme before and to be able to defend itself and attack from all angles.

“The biggest challenge was managing our time to meet the deadlines for the project whilst continuing to focus on our courses. We really underestimated the time needed to build and test the robot, but got there in the end.”

Jodie commented: “The whole experience has been incredible. I can’t compare it to anything that I have ever done before. The most valuable thing for me apart from gaining the practical skills from constructing and assembling the robot was the chance to develop presenting and communication skills from appearing on the programme.

“Being part of an all-female team was a real honour. I am so grateful to the University for the support it gave us to make what for me had always been a childhood dream.”

Pictures credit: BBC/Mentorn Media Scotland/Alan Peebles

An insight into engineering at Brighton

Prianka Sabharwal, BEng (Hons) Aeronautical Engineering gives us an insight into life as an engineering student at Brighton and the amazing experience taking part in Formula Student offers.

Good luck to Pria and the Brighton Racing Motors team who will be racing their car at Silverstone this weekend as part of the Formula Student competition. Check by here to find out how they got on.

“Not many universities around the UK offer Aeronautical Engineering and out of those that did, I made a point to call and speak to the heads of department. Brighton were by far the friendliest and after the phone call, it solidified what and I already thought, that Brighton was the place for me.
The Robot Wars and Formula Student projects have been real highlights. The projects were different but equally as rewarding. I also loved the opportunity I had to go to the Williams (F1 team) factory tour, that was definitely a day I’ll never forget! Claire Williams specifically asked for female engineers to go.
When Dr Coren released his project options for final year students and they were Formula Student related I was intrigued. I’d never heard of it before and the more I researched it the more I became excited by it.
I am part of the aerodynamics team, focusing on the front wing aerodynamics of the car. I’m also the team leader; a lot of the project is the actual design and manufacture of the car, but there is a lot of business and marketing criteria to meet from the IMechE so I help organise all submissions and liaise with the IMechE.
I think we all have our strong points and I think there are so many people on the team who are just incredible at what they do – but the best part is that we all help each other. For instance, we have someone who is incredible at CAD drawings and he always offered to help with whatever is needed.
Being a part of a team and how to work well in a team is something I’ll take away from my experience. It’s also the first time I have been a part of a project that’s spanned the course of a year, being involved in the start-up, design, manufacturing and then to the end result – it’s rewarding and definitely given me a work ethic that I’ll carry with me. And I have made good friends within the team.
I also did a summer internship at Emirates Engineering Centre in Dubai. . It was challenging but the overall experience was amazing. I think being the small fish in a big pond is always nerve racking – especially when I was still a student and they had all been practising engineering for years but it was interesting to see how much responsibility I was given from the get go. It was really interesting to see how things worked in the working world, not just read about them in a text book.
I learnt a lot, not just engineering principles but also work ethic and management. When I came back to finish my final year I found I was more driven and determined to succeed. And it definitely aided my final project decision because I enjoyed it so much.”


Flying club showcase our amazing flight simulators

Aeronautical Engineering student and president of the University of Brighton Aeronautical Society, Tom McNicholas, puts real flying aside for a moment to share some of the amazing bits of kit available here.

Tom says about his decision to come to Brighton:

“I chose to study engineering at Brighton for the impressive facilities available like the simulators and the wind tunnel. I would recommend my course to anyone – it’s clear to see the university’s pride in its engineering department and how far you can go after studying here. The staff couldn’t be more friendly and helpful, willing to do what they can to help you understand things.

Moving here isn’t as hard or as challenging as it may seem. You get to know people really quickly and apart from being o an excellent course, there’s many activities and societies to be getting involved with.”

Electronic and Computer Engineering Student Scholarship Success

Paxton, who design and manufacture security systems has announced the first recipients of the scheme which has been created in collaboration with the University of Brighton.

The Paxton Scholarship, which launched in November last year, offered the opportunity for students studying engineering and product design related courses at the University to win one of three scholarship places each worth £10,000 plus a 3-month paid work placement with the company from July 2018.

As part of the scholarship, the three scholars will participate in technology research projects at Paxton, that will then form the final year project of their degree course.

In November 2017, the company hosted a student open day at its new state-of-the-art facility, the Paxton Technology Centre, which was attended by over 100 students from the University of Brighton. The open day provided them with the opportunity to learn more about the company and the application process, meet Paxton’s experts in Product Development and Research, and receive hands on technology demonstrations of the company’s diverse product range.

From those that applied, 16 were then invited to an assessment day, where they undertook a series of practical tasks and interviews. The successful three students selected are:

  • Yury Johnson, aged 20 who is studying (BEng) Electronic and Computer Engineering
  • Laurence Budd, aged 21 who is studying (BSc) Computer Science
  • Sam Innes, aged 20 who is also studying (BSc) Computer Science

Commenting on the programme, Adam Stroud, Paxton’s Chief Executive, said: “I’d like to congratulate the three students that have secured the 2018 Paxton Scholarship. The Paxton Scholarship is a long-term initiative designed to ensure that we can secure the bright-minds needed for the company’s continued success and prosperity. I am thrilled at how the initiative was embraced by both the team at Paxton as well as the students and staff at the University of Brighton.

“We hope that for the students involved, the Paxton Scholarship will mean much more than just financial help.  Industry experience, without having to take a year out, will be invaluable to their development and help them to decide what career they wish to pursue.  We also believe it will continue to highlight the diverse range of roles available within the security industry and the opportunities offered by a growing and exciting business sector.”

Sam Davies, University of Brighton’s Director of Philanthropy & Alumni Engagement said: “Congratulations to the students and to Paxton for introducing this exciting and unique opportunity.

“We are delighted to have partnered with Paxton in establishing this new scholarship programme which provides our students with access to the realities of the workplace and the challenges companies like Paxton face on a day-to-day basis.”

New engine approach has cut fuel by up to 30 per cent

Scientists have unveiled new engine technology that will significantly increase fuel efficiency and reduce harmful emissions for heavy goods vehicles (HGVs).

Researchers at the University of Brighton and industry partners Ricardo have demonstrated that by storing and injecting liquid air into split-cycle engines, fuel consumption is reduced by up to 30 per cent while NOx fumes and particle emissions are also reduced.

The new technology would enable long-haul freight lorries to fully comply with inner-city emission restrictions, saving hauliers thousands of pounds per year. It also has potential cost-saving benefits for other diesel-fuelled industries including marine and rail.

Researchers say while the current trend for passenger cars is towards battery-powered vehicles, HGVs are hard to electrify. Batteries would take up more than half a long-distance truck’s payload, increasing costs and requiring yet more vehicles on the road to deliver the same quantity of goods.

Dr Rob Morgan, Reader in the University’s School of Computing, Engineering and Mathematics, and the lead researcher, said: “Even if a significant breakthrough in battery technology were achieved in the future, the strains on the recharging infrastructure and powergrid may still be prohibitive.

“On any sensible scenario, diesel-fuelled power generation will be around for many years. Our research is a potential game-changer.”
The technology, called CryoPower, realises a new thermal-power engine cycle – air is compressed in one cylinder, then heated by burning a fuel and expanded in a second cylinder. By splitting these processes into separate cylinders, the engine is more efficient and can be controlled to minimise toxic emissions such as NOx.

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Teaching engineers of the future

Leaping robots and flight simulation models were just two projects worked on at the University of Brighton by students from six schools.

They were taking part in this year’s University of Brighton-run Engineering Education Scheme (EES), nationally organised by the Engineering Development Trust.


EES enables Year 12 students to learn practical workplace skills during a six-month project with local businesses. Regionally co-ordinated by STEM Sussex, the outreach department of the University of Brighton, the scheme pairs teams of up to six Year 12 students and their teacher with a local engineering professional. Together, they work on real industrial problems for which the companies need solutions.

The scheme included a two-day residential workshop at the University when students were able to tackle engineering challenges and get a taste of university life by being given full access to the facilities at the University of Brighton.

Supported by company representatives and teachers, students will continue to work on their projects at school until the celebration and assessment day in April. Developing skills for project management, report writing, communication and teamwork form part of the scheme.

Taking part were Ifield Community College, who worked with engineers from Gatwick Airport; Bexhill College with General Dynamics; Oriel High School, Crawley, who worked with L3 Link and Schneider; Brighton Hove and Sussex Sixth Form College who worked with Mott MacDonald; and Trinity School who worked with Cory Riverside Energy.

For more information contact Rachel Day, Project Manager, STEM Sussex at

Bear in the air

Scientists here at Brighton carried a cuddly colleague with them as they boarded an aircraft for zero-gravity flights.

‘Captain Bright One’, our University’s teddy bear mascot, flew with researchers as the pilot took the plane on an upward trajectory and then reduced thrust and pushed the stick to achieve weightlessness.

The researchers used the European Space Agency (ESA) flights to test a ground-breaking system that has the potential to revolutionise the way heat can be managed – a crucial requirement for satellites and other space craft.

The research is being led by Professor Marco Marengo, Professor of Engineering. He said: “Due to the complete absence of air and the violent extremes in temperature in space, satellites, for example, require a thermal radiation screen in order to limit both the excessive heat from the sun and release of heat to the cold of outer space.”

His team is developing a novel ‘pulsating heat pipe’ system which dissipates heat using an evaporator and a condenser connected through a meandering capillary tube. They needed to test the system in weightless conditions to ensure it will operate successfully when it is used in outer space.

ESA has granted the team access to the International Space Station to test the system further and it likely will travel with British astronaut Tim Peake when he undertakes his second space mission sometime after 2020.

The news follows the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council granting the team £900,000 to develop the system further.

Photos of the Captain Bright One teddy were taken by research team member Dr Nicolas Miché, leader for the University’s Aeronautical Engineering courses.

For more information on the team’s research, go to:

Rolls Royce flying visit

Automotive Engineering graduate, Lyndon Roberts, made a brief but brilliant visit to the University of Brighton in a Rolls Royce ‘Dawn’ yesterday morning. Lyndon is a liaison engineer for Rolls Royce and is currently being sponsored for his MSc Automotive Electronics masters here at Brighton. He showed off the £300k state of the art convertible before leaving Syed Rezwan (below) in charge…