Brains at the Bevy is back!

Brains at the BEVY 2019
A series of short and enlightening talks from local academics

After running 3 successful series of ‘Brains at the Bevy’ talks we are delighted to announce a fourth series in 2019. These talks will take place at The Bevendean Community Pub in Moulsecoomb and are open to all!  They start at 6pm and last for an hour, including lots of time for questions and discussion. Tea and coffee will be provided during the talk and all are welcome to stay on afterwards to enjoy food and drink available at the Bevy.This programme is funded by the Widening Participation team at the University of Brighton.

The Bevy is at 50 Hillside, Brighton BN2 4TF -the 49 Bus stops outside the pub. Talks are free and all are welcome but booking is essential! Please RSVP to cupp@brighton.ac.uk and clearly state which talks you would like to attend.

6pm 24th April: Arianne Shahvisi, Brighton and Sussex Medical School:
The NHS and the hostile environment

The government is making it more and more difficult for migrants to access the NHS. Is this fair? What is the actual cost of health tourism? What about the migrants who staff the NHS? Which countries do they come from, and why do they choose to work here? This talk asks whether the current rules are fair, and explores the way in which the NHS in fact relies on the rest of the world.

6pm 22nd May:  Josh Cameron, University of Brighton
Why work should be good for our health not make us sick – and how!

Research shows that work can be good for our physical and mental health. But it also shows that work can make people sick. In this session I will invite people to discuss this and, crucially, what research says about how we can make more work better for our health and well-being.

6pm 3rd July:  Mark Devenney, University of Brighton
Being Improper.

We live in world organised around explicit and implicit rules which determine the proper ways of living, speaking and acting. In this talk I argue that the proper in all its forms limits possible ways of thinking the future – and I defend the idea that democracy is always improper.

6pm 25th September: Sarah Cork, University of Brighton
Stop telling me to eat 5 a day and help me do it!
We can’t open the newspaper, turn on the news or look at Facebook without seeing someone telling us to ‘eat this’ or ‘don’t’ eat that’ or ‘move more’ or ‘move differently’. Yet we know that giving people information doesn’t change behaviour. This talk will explore taking a social marketing approach to health behaviour change – using the way we sell the ‘bad things’ to sell the ‘good things’.  To make change we know we need to develop the right products, and make them easy to get hold of, affordable and attractive. Hear from social marketing and behavioural science about ways to encourage healthy behaviours that makes it easier to ‘do the right thing’.

6pm 30th October: Ilse Pienaar University of Sussex
What makes a brain cell vulnerable in the face of brain degenerating disease?
The brain contains hundreds of thousands individual units called cells. This talk will explore what makes a brain cell vulnerable to brain degenerating diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease? What makes the diagnosis so tragic is that most of us also know that once diagnosed, modern medicine cannot cure a patient, and a patient faces a long and slow decline in everyday functions they previously took for granted.  I will share research that can help in designing more effective therapies to restore the abilities of specific cell types, allowing for improved benefits for patients, whilst producing fewer side-effects.

6pm 27th November Frances Stenlake
Flora Merrifield and the Brighton and Hove Women’s Franchise Society.
This talk tells the little-known story of Flora Merrifield of 14 Clifton Terrace, Brighton. Her parents were Millicent Garrett Fawcett’s earliest supporters in the town, and Flora devoted her entire life to campaigning for women’s equality. As honorary secretary of the non-militant Brighton and Hove Women’s Franchise Society, she led the Brighton Road contingent in the Great Suffrage Pilgrimage to London in 1913, acted as secretary of the local War Relief Committee and of the 1916 Patriotic Housekeeping Exhibition, then chaired the Brighton and Hove Union of Women’s Local Government and Equal Citizenship.

 

The role of University Community Partnerships in research on economic insecurity and wellbeing

Wednesday 6 March 2019, 14:00.  Brighton Falmer Campus, Checkland C218

The role of University Community Partnerships in research on economic insecurity and wellbeing

David Wolff (Director) Community University Partnership Programme, University of Brighton
The prototype of university partnerships, CUPP has been in operation since 2003, helping to fund a wide range and huge volume of partnership projects,   enabling academics and students to work together with local communities for mutual benefit. The Director of CUPP, David Wolff, will give a short introductory talk on how the CUPP model works and the current programmes they are working on. 

Dr Paula Black (Director)Nottingham Civic Exchange, Nottingham Trent University
Nottingham Civic Exchange is a university think tank which has been established by Nottingham Trent University to maximise research, policy and practical impact by bringing together university expertise with partners seeking to address the needs of local communities. This means working with our staff and students to facilitate debate, act as a bridge between research and policy debates, and develop practical projects on a local, city and regional level.

We have focused our work on the key policy area of what have come to be known as ‘Ordinary Working Families’ or the ‘Just About Managing’. Whatever the preferred term, the challenges facing people on low to medium incomes have remained high on the political agenda in recent years. The debate is not simply about the level of household income. Iencompasses practical matters around access to housing and good jobs as well as the physical and mental health impacts of insecurity. Although the terminology used by commentators, researchers and politicians may vary, the core issues appear similar. However, there is little dialogue with communities themselves on the lived experience of economic insecurity and on what initiatives might help to reduce vulnerability to economic shocks. In this session we will look at the background to the debate on Ordinary Working Families and watch a short film commissioned by Nottingham Civic Exchange which listens to one single working parent talk about her experiences of insecurity, wellbeing and resilience.

To watch the film, see our website:

https://www.ntu.ac.uk/about-us/nottingham-civic-exchange/good-work-nottingham