The Brighton design sketch

From the Waste House to the Living House…

…Brighton chosen for sustainable house build

 The University of Brighton has been chosen to compete in a global competition to design and build a house using new technologies and reclaimed materials.

Brighton is the only UK university to be shortlisted in the U.S. Department of Energy’s biennial ‘Solar Decathlon Europe’ contest which challenges teams of students and staff to combine innovation, market potential, and efficiency.

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Time’s up on waste

The University of Brighton is hosting an exhibition and seminars at a global design and build show dedicated to promoting sustainability and slashing waste.

Ecobuild 2018, the largest free-to-attend show of its kind in the world, runs from 6 March at ExceL London and comprises three days of talks, presentations, workshops and debates engaged with waste as a global issue. Read More

CIOB Bright Futures Challenge

Four students from the Built Environment subject area competed this week in the CIOB Bright Futures challenge for the Sussex and London region.  In total 14 teams entered from across the region, from Universities such as the University of East London, London South Bank University and Westminster University, as well as a team of graduates from a contractor.  The challenge consisted of three rounds testing the students’ knowledge, teamwork and innovation.

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Designing for Performance – IES Free CPD Seminar

Designing and managing buildings for more efficient performance is a concept that is continuously being reviewed and improved globally. In light of this, designers and stakeholders are keen on the evolution and inclusion of the virtual world in construction processes. This CPD seminar held at the University of Brighton was delivered by Dr Naghman Khan (Business Development Manager for IES).

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A warm welcome at our open day

Sunshine, blue skies, our brilliant ambassadors and friendly staff welcomed visitors to our campus open day on Saturday 17 June.

Open days are a great way to find out about the local area and campus where you will be studying. You’ll also be able to hear more about your chosen subject and talk to our staff and current students.

If you are thinking about beginning your studies in 2018 and missed this one, find out more about upcoming events on our website.

Our INTREPID Dr Mary Geary

Barcelona’s water of life: el agua de la vida!

Dr Geary travelled to Barcelona last month as part of an EU ‘Co-operation in Science and Technology’ initiative called the INTREPID training school. Here is her diary of the trip.

In the famous Catalan fairy story ‚‘The Water of Life‘, also known by its original name ‘El agua de la vida’, only the deliverance of the water of life, sourced from a magic spring in the hills, can save a family from being turned to stone by an evil giant. It is the daughter of the family who outsmarts the ogre and restores life with the water. The life of her own family, of her petrified neighbours and of her surroundings are all rejuvanated as the water she spills on the return from the mountain turns everything green and fecund and frees the people from the giant’s curse. That water is still seen as the very essence of Catalan life is clear throughout the urban fabric of its capital city.

Wedged between the Mediterranean Sea and the estuaries of the Llobregat and Besos rivers and with the Serra de Collserola mountain range as its backdrop, Barcelona is a water-centric city fiercely proud of its heritage. As the economic powerhouse of Catalonia, its historic wealth was built around its port, driving its shipping, mercantile, leather and textile industries. The evidence of that financial prowess – Barcelona’s architectural splendour – attracts millions of tourists every year. Power, water, wealth have historically connected together to forge a city of almost 2 million residents; whose population rises threefold every year with almost 6 million visitors per annum.

As one of those 6 million visitors I travelled to Barcelona in early February this year as part of an EU ‘Co-operation in Science and Technology’ initiative called the INTREPID training school. My fellow Sustainable Futures researchers and I were collaborating to work together in a four day workshop, sharing experiences and learning together how interdisciplinary collaboration is at the heart of undertaking sustainability research. Working across disciplines – we were a disparate group of ecologists, urban planners, civil engineers, environmental lawyers, social scientists amongst others –we discussed how it is possible to try to make connections amidst and outside of our own scientific perspectives to find holistic pragmatic solutions to urgent, real world problems. As a Research Fellow based in SET, understanding how communities understand, articulate and action changes in their local water environments is crucial. It helps me contextualise how macro influences are interpreted and responded to, and what steps and strategies policy makers and governance bodies need to undertake to make sustainability science comprehensible and relevant. Read More