Soapbox Science’s first visit to Brighton

Head down to the seafront between 1-4pm on Saturday 29 July and celebrate women in Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics and Medicine (STEMM) with Soapbox Science.

Soapbox Science hosts events across the UK and the world raising the profile of women in science – breaking down barriers and challenging stereotypes about who a researcher is. And they are coming to Brighton for the first time this summer.
Chantal Nobs, a PhD student at the University of Brighton, was one of 12 women selected to participate in the Soapbox Science London event on London’s Southbank in 2016.

Find out more about the Brighton event here.

Finding ways to fill Britain’s Potholes

A team of our Technical Engineering instructors joined students at Midhurst Rother College and engineers from the infrastructure group Balfour Beatty took on the challenge to help solve potholes on our roads.

Part of an Engineering Education Scheme (EES) co-ordinated by our STEM Sussex team, the scheme is a six-month partnership and involved a two-day residential workshop here.

The scheme encourages Year 12 students to recognise the importance of science and engineering by providing an opportunity to gain useful skills and experience by working on a challenging project in partnership with industry.

Midhurst Rother is one of ten schools and colleges which came to the university with engineers from different companies to work on projects including improving security systems, improving ways to monitor phosphates in waste water and creating models to display at science fairs including the Big Bang Fair South East.

Midhurst Rother students are working with engineers to look for more efficient materials and ways of filling road holes. The project follows a report from Local Government Association which estimates the pothole repair bill could reach £14 billion by 2020.

After their two-day workshop, Dominic Ryan, one of our Technical Instructors, said: “The students managed the project from start to finish – they were able to plan and be hands-on, utilising their scientific, innovative and creative skills.”

James Baldwin, science teacher at Midhurst Rother College, said: “The students enjoyed the opportunity to use the university’s concrete lab and equipment. They are all looking to study a subject linked with science or engineering at university and the scheme allowed them to see what this would entail.”