Celebrating success

We celebrated some fantastic successes today with our award-winning computing students.

Head of School, John Taylor, introduced the School of Computing Engineering and Mathematics awards ceremony by leading a round of applause and congratulating all our winners.

Congratulations to Beck Rush, Digital Media Development BSc(Hons) and Arun Sharma Computer Science (Games) BSc(Hons)who both received the Lancia Consult Award for Excellence in Computing Placement Year and £500 each. The prize is awarded by a University of Brighton alumnus, the MD of Lancia.

Becky spent her placement year at the BBC, you can read about some of her experiences on this blog, including this post. And Arun worked for West Control Solutions, a local software company. We will be finding out more from Arun about how his placement went, soon.

Rupert Agnew Computer Science BSc(Hons) received the FDM Group Prize, and £250, for the best development project from a final year student completing either the Computer Science BSc(Hons), Computer Science (Games) BSc(Hons) or Software Engineering BSc(Hons). You can find out more about Rupert’s project on the blog, here.

Digital Games Production student, Laura Marquick was the recipient of an award from one of our accrediting bodies, the BCS, the Chartered Institute of IT Project Prize for the best project by a final year undergraduate computing student. Laura’s project explored ways to use the structure, abstraction, and discipline of programming to interpret physiological data from the human body and product unique visual effects that reflect the natural beauty of the body’s biological processes.

Our computing division has strong links with Wired Sussex, and Digital Media student, Jaime Dare, and Digital Games Production student, Scott Jarvis were the recipients of awards from Wired Sussex for the best project for a Digital Media, Digital Media Development and Digital Games Production by a final year student.

The celebrations for our graduating students continued into the afternoon with our school graduation ceremony at the Brighton Centre.

Congratulations and well done everyone!

Putting learning into practice on placement

Ganiyu Ibraheem, BSc(Hons) Software Engineering tells us why his placement year was the highlight of his course.

I’ve always had an interest in software development; having participated in programming competitions since high school. I decided I wanted to study Software Engineering at Brighton University as it is one of the few universities offering the courses and with the capacity to support my academic needs.

One of the best parts for me has been the amount of support I received from my lecturers, it really proved helpful throughout the course. The staff are very helpful and have lots of ideas on how to progress academically and professionally. And the course is quite flexible as there are numerous modules available to choose from during the final year ranging over different areas of software development.

The highlight of my course has been my placement year. I was a Software Development intern in the Research and Development Information department at AstraZeneca in Cambridge. I worked clinical trials software for the scientists and utility software for use internally within the department.

The most challenging part of the placement the shift from academia into the industrial setting, as this requires you to draw heavily on the knowledge gained in university and apply it to practical projects. The most interesting part was the amount of exposure I gained at AstraZeneca, as the company provided a lot of support and resources for our professional development.

Another highlight of the placement year was receiving a World-wide Developer Conference (WWDC, 2016) Scholarship from Apple, as I attended a lot of seminars from Apple Engineers in the context of Mobile App Development.

I intend to further pursue a career in Research and Development. The course and placement year has enabled me to pursue a master’s degree whilst I spend the summer working at Microsoft Research Cambridge.

I definitely would recommend the course as the course content is very up to date with industry standards and very practical in nature. And I would encourage prospective students to take advantage of the wide array of opportunities and support provided by the academic staff. And also to take a placement year if they can.

Dream big and aim high

Umair Khalil, Third Year (BSc) Hons Computer Science gives us an insight into life as a computing student at Brighton.

The reason why I chose to study at Brighton is because the curriculum reflects what is being used and practiced in industry. The city of Brighton was another big factor as the community here is diverse and brings together the many different cultures within a vibrant city.

The guest lectures have been crucial in understanding how content taught at the University can be instrumental to tasks undertaken by large sized companies. As an example, the Pension’s Regulator gave a lecture for one of my modules, showing how some of their technical and business processes consist of some of the material we learn here. This was a prime example in showing how the course is up-to-date and useful for students to see how the newest technologies can be used in almost any industry.

The course remains up-to-date with the current technologies and theoretical. In the final year, there are a wide array of options to choose from. Some of the modules help to gain the required knowledge on a particular field you want to advance in. I also found the final year project a good resource in helping me to gather a thorough understanding on a topic that is not taught at the University.

The staff have been extremely supportive since the minute I arrived. They have all helped to push me out of my comfort zone. They have always provided me with the advice and the tools to stand out in a very demanding industry, and how I can maximise opportunities in and out of university.

Although I didn’t do a placement year, I did do a spring internship at IBM which taught me massively about the responsibility of client requirements and how the latest pieces of technology within the field of computer science can simplify many everyday tasks and aid businesses to achieve their long-term goals.

The knowledge I have gained from the course has been an invaluable resource in equipping me for life after I graduate. I feel as if the three years I have spent at here have really prepared me for any small or big task I encounter in my everyday life.
I would definitely recommend the course to those who have a technical background, not afraid of challenging themselves and have an aspiration to be involved within a hugely prosperous industry. As there are constant revolutions within Computer Science, there are endless possibilities about what might occur within the field. There are new topics and tools which would be of interest to people based on their skillset and curiosity.

What I would say to a lot of people is to dream big and aim high. By setting a high standard for yourself, you can achieve many great things and life is too short for not taking any ambitious risks. Try to get as much experience as you can by either undertaking some side projects and publishing this online or getting some work experience. A lot of small and large firms hold internships so be sure to apply as this would put you in a great position when applying for jobs. As we’re living in a digital age, maximise your online profile by utilising websites such as GitHub and LinkedIn, since a lot of recruiters in the field of computer science tend to examine students on these profiles. Lastly, don’t be intimated by the job market when it comes to graduating, employers tend to recruit hard working students who are not afraid to have a bit of fun and there’s no better place to learn about the two other than the University of Brighton.

A warm welcome at our open day

Sunshine, blue skies, our brilliant ambassadors and friendly staff welcomed visitors to our campus open day on Saturday 17 June.

Open days are a great way to find out about the local area and campus where you will be studying. You’ll also be able to hear more about your chosen subject and talk to our staff and current students.

If you are thinking about beginning your studies in 2018 and missed this one, find out more about upcoming events on our website.

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Now that data is ubiquitous, how do we make it useful?

We are proud to welcome back one of our distinguished alumni and honorary graduate, Professor Mandy Chessell, for the final Distinguished Lecture series of the year on Tuesday 6 June, 5-6pm in Huxley 300.

As digital technology sweeps through every aspect of our lives, data has become ubiquitous. The problem is that much of this data is useless because it no longer has enough context with it for people, processes and analytics to understand what it means.

This is an amazing opportunity to hear Professor Chessell examine current data management practices and tools and explain why data loses its context. She proposes an alternative and open approach that will expand our ability to use data to its full extent. She also looks at the issue of providing appropriate protection and governance to valuable intellectual property and sensitive data.

Professor Chessell CBE FREng CEng FBCS is an IBM Distinguished Engineer, Master Inventor, member of the IBM Academy of Technology and Fellow of the Royal Academy. Read her profile.

Find out more and book your place at the lecture here.

Moulsecoomb Campus Open Day

Open days are a great way to find out about the local area and the campus where you will be studying. You will also be able to hear more about your chosen subject and talk to our staff and current students.

If you are thinking of beginning your studies in 2018 come along to our campus open day on Saturday 17 June. Find out more about open days on our website.

Soap Box Science’s first visit to Brighton

Head down to the seafront between 1-4pm on Saturday 29 July and celebrate women in Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics and Medicine (STEMM) with Soapbox Science.

Soapbox Science hosts events across the UK and the world raising the profile of women in science – breaking down barriers and challenging stereotypes about who a researcher is. And they are coming to Brighton for the first time this summer.
Chantal Nobs, a PhD student at the University of Brighton, was one of 12 women selected to participate in the Soapbox Science London event on London’s Southbank in 2016.

Find out more about the Brighton event here.

Computing revolution

Dr Martin De Saulles, Principal Lecturer on our computing courses, has published a book on a rapidly developing area of the computing and communications sectors which “has the potential to change how we live and work”.

The Internet of Things and Business (IoT), published by Routledge, “represents the next evolution of the computing revolution and will see the embedding of information and communication technologies within machines at home and in the workplace and across a broad range of industrial processes. The effect will be a radical restructuring of industries and business models driven by massive flows of data providing new insights into how the man-made and natural worlds work.”

Dr De Saulles explores the business models emerging from the IoT and considers the challenges as well as the opportunities they pose to businesses around the world.
He said: “Via real examples and a range of international case studies, the reader will develop an understanding of how this technology revolution will impact on the business world as well as on broader society.”

Find out more about Dr De Saulles book here.