Rethinking Software Systems Security

haris-mouratidisInaugural lecture from Professor Haris Mouratidis.

Software systems are an important and critical component of modern human society, used in almost every sector from transport, power and telecoms to health-care, military and education. Different stakeholders use software systems to different ends. Major corporations use them to perform critical processes and store confidential corporate data; governments need them to support citizen services, run military operations and exchange highly confidential data; and individuals use them to perform every day activities from personal banking to storing private information.

As a result, today’s economy and society are vitally dependent on software systems operating, not just according to their specifications, but also with a certain degree of trust and security. The increasing adoption and integration of software systems within an environment of rapid technological advancements has demanded systems that go beyond mono-dimensional technical solutions simultaneously raising a set of tightly intertwined challenges.

Rethinking Software Systems Security
Haris Mouratidis
Professor of Software Systems Engineering

Thursday 24 November 2016 at 6.15 pm.
Huxley Lecture Theatre
Huxley Building
Moulsecoomb

Free event. All are welcome. If you would like to attend please register online no later than 48 hours prior to the event.

British Science Festival heads for Brighton

british-science-festival-logoOne of Europe’s leading and longest established science festivals is coming to Brighton next year. And we will be co-hosting it!

The University of Brighton will co-host the 2017 British Science Festival with the University of Sussex from 5-8 September.

The festival, organised by the British Science Association, will have a programme of over 100 events featuring cutting-edge science from world-leading academics covering everything from technology and engineering to social sciences.

Welcoming the announcement, Vice-Chancellor Professor Debra Humphris said: “I am delighted that the University of Brighton will be co-hosting the British Science Festival next year. We were keen to grasp this wonderful opportunity to showcase our world-leading research alongside cutting-edge science from around the globe in an accessible and engaging way.

“The city of Brighton & Hove is world-renowned for its Arts Festival. By hosting the British Science Festival, we can throw open the doors of our facilities to the wider community, including our new state-of-the-art Advanced Engineering Building that is currently under construction.”

We’ll keep you posted as more details are confirmed, and hope to see you all there!

University building scoops top award

The project to refurbish the University of Brighton’s iconic Cockcroft Building has won in the Higher Education category of the prestigious Architects’ Journal Retrofit Awards 2016.

The Cockcroft Building on the University’s Moulsecoomb campus has been a familiar landmark on Brighton’s Lewes Road since the 1960’s.

The awards jury said: “This is a bold project, particularly from a sustainability point of view – and a model for future similar projects. It focuses well on how people use the building. The exterior has been elegantly improved and the interior creatively revamped.”


Welcoming the award, Vice-Chancellor, Professor Debra Humphris said: “This is really excellent news and I congratulate the team involved in this major project. The refurbishment of the Cockcroft Building is an important part of our ongoing investment programme which aims to ensure that our students have access to world-class facilities.”

The multi-million pound refurbishment programme, which took three years to complete, was carried out whilst the building was still being used by staff and students and included:
• Development of state-of-the-art new learning laboratories and office spaces to house schools within the university’s College of Life, Health and Physical Sciences
• Installation of new windows to improve insulation throughout the building
• Exposing the ceiling space to highlight the architectural features of the building’s interior
• Opening up corridors in the building to improve lighting, people movement and provide social and informal learning spaces for students and staff to use.
• Reducing noise levels by putting in place sound buffering and dampening features
• Installing a new roof surface to improve insulation and energy efficiency.