Brighton SEO – keeping me up-to-date

brighton seoI’ve just got back from another interesting Brighton SEO conference. I started going to these twice yearly (April and September) events a few years ago when there were only a couple of hundred people attending. At today’s event there were about 3,500 attendees, 9 different streams and over 90 speakers all packed into the Brighton Centre. It’s a great way to find out the latest thinking in the digital marketing world and chat to practitioners from across the industry. I usually bump into current and former students and today was no exception. In terms of content, the conference has moved on from focusing on what marketers need to do to rank more highly in search results to include social media marketing, pay per click (PPC), AI and machine learning marketing applications, ecommerce and regulatory matters. I always recommend my students attend the event as tickets are free if you are quick off the mark (the free tickets normally all go in a few minutes!).

I could only stay until the lunch break but I’ve come away with some exciting ideas for updating my undergraduate and postgraduate digital marketing modules at the University of Brighton for the 2017/18 academic year. These include:

  • running workshops on implementing structured data to improve search rankings and results listings;
  • running some in-class demos of voice search using the Amazon Echo and Google Home devices and exploring what the implications of voice search are for marketers;
  • helping students understand the importance of the Google Knowledge Graph and what it means for search, particularly voice search;
  • running some demonstrations of the application of AI to search using services such as Pinterest’s “Shop the Look” and “Lens” and Google’s Translate service for images;
  • helping students understand the range of data sources which marketers can use to improve the application of analytics to market research and targeting. I think there will be some overlap here with my interest in the Internet of Things (IoT).

So, plenty of ideas to keep me busy over the next few months.

Success for MSc student

This post is from James Dunn who has just graduated from our MSc in User Experience Design. 

James Dunn

James Dunn, MSc User Experience Design

Shortly after completing my MSc in User Experience Design I was invited to submit my Major project for the Brighton University Environmental Award, for which I was delighted to receive a ‘highly commended’ recognition.

My project involved the creation of a prototype smartphone App called “Driven”.

It is designed to provide motorists with real-time vehicle telemetry geared around a variety of driving styles, including economic/sustainable motoring. Additionally, it automatically logs journeys, allowing users to build up a picture of their motoring habits over time.

It works by using a small hardware component connected to the car’s diagnostic port to read data from the vehicles systems, and transmit it to a smartphone. The App interprets this data and is presents it to the user via an appropriate interface, the design of which was the focus of the project.

The resulting information can be used to make informed decisions about driving styles, leading to more economical and sustainable behaviour. The project was conceived due to a lack of suitable existing products in the marketplace that offered comparable functionality. It feeds on the desires of users for increased information and data about the way they live their lives, extending from the number of paces they take each day, to the number of miles driven.

Motoring has for a long time been high on the agenda in sustainability conversations, with legislation being passed to encourage new vehicles to reduce their environmental impact. While it can’t force drivers to change their habits, it does provide factual data that can be acted on to reduce carbon emissions and encourage sustainable motoring.

The project was a lot of fun to work on, and concluded an excellent year at the University. Since graduation I have been working as a UX (user experience) Consultant, introducing a user-orientated design process to a software development company based in London.

You can follow me on Twitter @jdworksUX

Moodboard

Moodboard: developing the branding/look and feel for the App

User stories

User stories: capturing reqirements during a user workshop

 

testing

Testing: Usability testing of the prototype App

MSc student ‘Data Security and Brexit’ winner

Congratulations to MSc student Anna Hristova who was a winner in the BCS Women Lovelace Colloquium 2017 with a paper submitted as part of her Data Management module.  Anna’s module leader, Dr Sanaz Fallahkhair, encouraged her to enter and this year’s competition saw the highest number of entrants to date (116).  Anna will be going to Aberystwyth University when they host the prize winner’s event in April.  Read her abstract ‘Data Security and Brexit’ here.  Continue reading

Soap Box Science’s first visit to Brighton

Head down to the seafront between 1-4pm on Saturday 29 July and celebrate women in Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics and Medicine (STEMM) with Soapbox Science.

Soapbox Science hosts events across the UK and the world raising the profile of women in science – breaking down barriers and challenging stereotypes about who a researcher is. And they are coming to Brighton for the first time this summer.
Chantal Nobs, a PhD student at the University of Brighton, was one of 12 women selected to participate in the Soapbox Science London event on London’s Southbank in 2016.

Find out more about the Brighton event here.

A Project in the Life of a Visual Journalism Trainee

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A few months ago, I completed my first big project for the Visual Journalism team at BBC News. I worked alongside another developer to create the ‘Which World Leader are You?’ piece.

I was brought into the project as it looked like one which I could learn a lot from it, buddy up with an experienced developer and, given the scale of the project, it would probably benefit from an extra set of hands.

Continue reading

Computing revolution

Dr Martin De Saulles, Principal Lecturer on our computing courses, has published a book on a rapidly developing area of the computing and communications sectors which “has the potential to change how we live and work”.

The Internet of Things and Business (IoT), published by Routledge, “represents the next evolution of the computing revolution and will see the embedding of information and communication technologies within machines at home and in the workplace and across a broad range of industrial processes. The effect will be a radical restructuring of industries and business models driven by massive flows of data providing new insights into how the man-made and natural worlds work.”

Dr De Saulles explores the business models emerging from the IoT and considers the challenges as well as the opportunities they pose to businesses around the world.
He said: “Via real examples and a range of international case studies, the reader will develop an understanding of how this technology revolution will impact on the business world as well as on broader society.”

Find out more about Dr De Saulles book here.

 

Partnering with an alumnus to develop a novel legal software system

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In November The University of Brighton has won £144,794 funding to work with Brighton-based firm, Family Law Partners. The project will utilise the university’s knowledge engineering and artificial intelligence expertise to develop a triage style system to underpin a novel model of family law provision.

Alan Larkin

Alan Larkin, Director of Family Law Partners

Family Law Partners specialise exclusively in family law and their Director, Alan Larkin is an alumnus of the university. Alan said:

“We are delighted to be working with the University of Brighton on this project. We see technology as having a pivotal role in the future delivery of family law services, and it is with great excitement that we have teamed up with knowledge engineering specialists from the university to innovate our service. On a personal level, it is also particularly satisfying to be strengthening our existing relationship with our local university and the institution where I undertook my legal training.”

The funding has been awarded through a two-year Knowledge Transfer Partnership (KTP) supported by the Government’s innovation agency, Innovate UK.

The project will be led by Dr John Kingston and supported by Professor Miltos Petridis, both from the university’s School of Computing, Engineering and Mathematics.

Family Law Partners has already been shortlisted for a national award in the ‘Innovation in IT’ category for development of its first commercial software offer, Siaro, and by collaborating with university experts to use technology to streamline elements of the divorce process, they will be further innovating their service to be at the very forefront Family Law provision.

Winner of Best Poster award at AI 2016 conference

The annual BCS conference on Artificial Intelligence (AI-2016), held from 13-15 December in Cambridge, had a significant presence from CEM with two accepted papers; one poster; and Professor Miltos Petridis as one of the Chairs of the conference. The presentations covered the topics of artificial intelligence and legal liability; comparing different learning methods for predicting user behaviour; and using data mining to enhance online advertising.

Congratulations to the presenters of the accepted papers and poster: Nikolay Burlutskiy, Maria Diapouli, John Kingston and Miltos Petridis. Congratulations also to co-authors Nour Ali, Alexei Chernov, Roger Evans, Andrew Fish and Stelios Kapetanakis. Special congratulations are due to Maria Diapouli and Miltos Petridis for winning the prize for the best poster presentation, chosen by conference delegates.

Maria Diapouli

Maria Diapouli with her poster

AI Poster winners: Maria Diapouli and Miltos Petridis

AI Poster winners: Maria Diapouli and Miltos Petridis