Explore your options through Clearing

Good luck to everyone getting their A-Level results today!

If it doesn’t go to plan or you’ve had a change of heart about what you want do next, Clearing is a chance to change direction and make new plans.

If you need help navigating your way through the Clearing process, check out our handy online guide and see which courses you can still apply for. You can also call our Clearing hotline on 01273 644000 which is open now, and has extended hours from 7am to 7pm on results day.

If you’ve not yet visited the University of Brighton we have Clearing open days on Saturday 17th and Tuesday 20th August. You’ll be able to take a tour of the campus where you will be studying, get advice about accommodation, take part in a Q&A with academic staff and chat to students. Find out more about visiting us.

If you’re navigating big choices and big changes, we say: stay curious, explore, and trust yourself. The best journeys don’t always follow a map.

Royal Society of Chemistry role for Professor Lizzy Ostler

Professor Ostler has been appointed to a leading role in the education branch of the RSC.

She was elected to the Education Division Council of the RSC by the body’s existing members.

The division “promotes the study and dissemination of knowledge of chemical education at all levels”. It organises regional activities and projects based around addressing the needs of teachers.

 Professor Ostler is already a Fellow of the RSC and a Chartered Chemist.

 She said: “I am delighted to be selected by our members to work with the other Council members on shaping the future of Chemical Education.”

Taking a stand against cancer

Two University of Brighton scientists are joining a pop-up stand in Brighton’s Churchill Square shopping centre on Friday (1 Feb) as part of events to mark next Monday’s (4 Feb) World Cancer Day.

Marta Falcinelli, PhD researcher in the University’s School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences (PABS), is passionate about fighting the disease and will be talking to members of the public at the Cancer Research UK (CRUK) event.

Marta joined the University’s Stress & Cancer group in 2016, fulfilling her ambition: “I have always been intrigued by science and at university I started to be very interested in molecular biology and scientific investigation, dreaming to perform experiments and work in a lab.

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Athena SWAN silver award for our school

The university’s School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Science (PABS) has received a Silver Award from Advance HE’s highly-regarded SWAN Charter, which promotes gender equality in the representation, progression and success of staff and students in Higher Education.

The Silver Award was granted in recognition of actions implemented to advance careers of women in science over the past few years.

The School of Applied Social Science, meanwhile, won a Bronze Award for their first submission which was the result of concerted effort from across the school. The schools join the university’s School of Environment and Technology(SET) and Brighton and Sussex Medical School in holding an Athena SWAN prize. The awards are valid for four years.

Professor Tara Dean, Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Research and Enterprise, is Chair of the Athena SWAN Steering Group and is the university’s Gender Equality Champion.

She said: “I am delighted that two more of our schools have secured Athena SWAN recognition. In order to receive the award, schools need to provide evidence through robust self-analysis of how they engage, support and develop staff and students and devise an action plan to help them work towards their goals of gender equality.

“These awards are an endorsement of our commitment to equality in our working practices across our broad subject portfolio. We continue to enhance our policies and practices to promote a culture of equality of opportunity and aspiration among our staff and our current and future students.”

The University of Brighton has held an institutional Athena SWAN Bronze Award since 2013 and in 2016 it became one of only a handful of higher education institutions nationally to achieve an institutional award under the new expanded charter which now includes disciplines beyond STEMM.

The new awards will be presented at a ceremony to be in Southampton. Meanwhile, the university is committed to all schools achieving a Bronze Awards by 2020.

 

 

Innovative installation to be hosted in Huxley Building

A cutting-edge installation which produces real-time digital art from the data in its immediate surroundings has been installed in the Huxley Building.

Duality of Life, was created by Nexus Studios, an award-winning company with offices in London and Los Angeles.

It consists of a dual-screen display that generates real-time digital ‘lifeforms’ from interactions and local data. The design evolves as the data shifts, with the ‘lifeforms’ changing shape and movement. Read More

Hands-on science for Brighton students

Young people with an interest in science and engineering can learn how to turn their passion into a career at a science fair in Brighton tomorrow (11 July).

Big Bang @ Brighton will take place at the University of Brighton and organisers are promising “an exciting, colourful and noisy event” aimed at encouraging more students to pursue further studies and potential careers in science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM).

Organised by STEM Sussex, the University of Brighton’s STEM outreach department, the event is funded by the Sussex Learning Network’s National Collaborative Outreach Programme (NCOP), a four-year programme aimed at encouraging more young people, particularly those from disadvantaged backgrounds, into higher education.

Big Bang @ Brighton will feature a range of hands-on activities, workshops and shows provided by many local companies, universities and colleges and other organisations, highlighting the STEM-related opportunities available to young people in the area. Read More

Bhavik Patel and Melanie Flint

£221,000 to find a new tool to help fight cancer

Bhavik Patel and Melanie FlintThe University of Brighton has been awarded £221,000 to develop a sensor device that will measure biomarkers in tissue to aid personalised cancer therapy.

Currently, little is known about how different amounts and types of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species influence the state of tumours and their response to chemotherapy.

Researchers will be looking to develop a novel electroanalytical sensor that can monitor these species over long time frames and provide answers to these questions.

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Breakthrough in ageing research

University of Brighton scientists have helped discover a way of regenerating  ageing skin cells – with compounds based on those found in red wine, dark chocolate and red grapes.

Laboratory experiments showed cells not only look physically younger but behave more like young cells and start dividing.

Professor Richard Faragher, the University’s Professor of Biogerontology, and Dr Lizzy Ostler, Head of Chemistry, said the breakthrough should generate more research into tackling health issues associated with ageing.

Professor Faragher said: “These findings illustrate the enormous potential of ageing research to improve the quality of later life. Older people no more want to be sickly ‘frequent flyers’ with the NHS than teenagers do.

“A recent Government report recognised historic underinvestment in ageing research in the UK. I say to politicians of all parties: Redress this now and give our older people the healthy futures they deserve.”

Dr Ostler said: “Breakthroughs of this kind really need chemists and biologists working on research and teaching together under the same roof. We prize our multidisciplinary collaborative atmosphere at Brighton. This breakthrough vindicates that approach.”

The scientists, members of the University’s Stress, Ageing and Disease Centre of Research and Enterprise Excellence, worked together to select the best compounds for testing from a library designed and synthesised by Dr Vishal Birar, whilst he was undertaking a University of Brighton-funded PhD studentship under Dr Ostler’s supervision. Read More