Ways to Wellbeing

1. THE BIG CHILL
Wednesday May 10th in Cockcroft 327 12 – 3Come along, enjoy some rest, relaxation and therapeutic activities, healthy snack and a chance to sit quietly or have a chat and gain some tips on stress management from your SSGT Charlotte Morris and advice on revision and exam techniques from Academic Skills Tutor Fiona Ponikwer.

We look forward to seeing you there!

2. TODAY! FIVE WAYS TO WELLBEING
SSGTs will be on hand with information, freebies, activities and special guests today May 9th 12 – 2

3. WELLBEING WORKSHOPS
Develop your bounce! Become more resilient to stress – Wednesday 24th May, 1:30 – 3, Mithras G6

For more information / to book: https://blogs.brighton.ac.uk/studentnewsandevents/2016/10/07/wellbeing-workshops/

4. MENTAL HEALTH AWARENESS drop in
https://www.mentalhealth.org.uk/campaigns/mental-health-awareness-week

Your SSGT Charlotte Morris will be available on Wednesday 10th May at Huxley reception 10 – 12:30 to share resources and answer any questions you have about mental health – PLUS ENJOY A FREE MASSAGE! 

There will be extra availability for confidential one to one appointments with Charlotte until the end of the month: to make an appointment to discuss any aspect of stress, wellbeing, mental health or anything at all which is affecting you / your studies, please email ssgtpabs@brighton.ac.uk

For more wellbeing information and tips like my facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/pabsstudentsupport/

You can also gain support and advice from Student Services: studentservices@brighton.ac.uk and the Student Union.

Research insight

Asa White, Doctoral Researcher within our school, gets to call wading around in the Bourne Rivulet work!

Asa’s is researching how an invisible chemical may be affecting invertebrate and fish life. It has three main elements.

  • using electric fishing surveys around three watercress farms over two years to ascertain whether discharges are having a population-level impact on fish communities
  • at the same sites, surveying habitat suitability for salmonids in terms of the physical habitat and prey species abundances
  • running laboratory ecotoxicology experiments to study the effects of PEITC on fish. The aim of the research is to understand what effect, if any, watercress farming is having on fish populations. Should a negative impact be uncovered, then mitigation strategies to lessen the impacts could be developed to ensure that fish populations in chalk stream headwaters flourish.

Read his story in this article published on the Wild Trout Trust website.

Blood Culture

Two lecturers from our school, Claire Marriott and Simonne Weeks, have played a part in the development of Blood Culture, an arts podcast.

Lance Dann, Course Leader BA (Hons) TV & Digital Media Production here at Brighton, created the podcast and explains more:

Over the weekend, Blood Culture, a University of Brighton related project was the top arts or drama podcast in the UK, knocking The Archers off its seemingly permanent Number 1 position (it also broke into the Top 40 of all UK podcasts briefly giving Russell Brand a run for his money).

While not directly a UoB project, research derived from the series will be, and several members of our staff were involved in its creation. These include myself as its creator, Phil Connolly who developed the story with me and created a series of supporting films, Claire Marriott and Simone Weeks who provided consultation on bio-medical issues and Marley Cole, who designed sound for one of our episodes.

Blood Culture is a techno thriller that addresses issues of the commodification of the body, developments in stem cell science, the exploitation of interns in the workplace and the relationship of capital to medicine in a postdigital environment.  It also involves a fair few fist fights, some tough female protagonists, a series of related web-sites and even an interactive SMS game. The whole project was supported by The Wellcome Trust.

You can watch the trailer for Blood Culture here.

 

Investigating Lyme disease on the South Downs

Lyme borreliosis is an infectious disease caused by the bacterium Borelia burgdorferi. The bacterium is transmissible between hosts through the bite of blood-sucking ticks which parasitise mammals, birds, and humans. Landscape features, such as woodland or grassland, affect the movement of host animals, however, a knowledge gap exists on the extent of LB spread in Southern England. Mr Jo Middleton, Dr Anja Rott & Dr Ian Cooper presented a poster at the Microbiology Society annual conference in Edinburgh a few weeks ago, detailing their on-going research in to this neglected disease.

Investigating Lyme disease on the South Downs

 

Early morning mist on fields and trees

Royal Society honour

Professor Colin Smith, expert on genomics and how the science could lead to improved ways of combatting diseases has been invited to organise a Royal Society meeting with world leaders in the field.

The prestigious Theo Murphy International Scientific meeting at Chicheley Hall on 5 – 6 March next year is entitled ‘Changing views of translation: from ribosome profiling to high resolution imaging of single molecules in vivo’. It will bring together senior and early career scientists from around the world to discuss how new technologies are providing novel insights into how cells function.

Professor Smith is Professor of Functional Genomics in our school. He joined the university last year and is establishing a new genomics facility to investigate future potential for highlighting disease risk and revealing the genetic basis for human diseases.

A ‘genome’ comprises the complete set of DNA molecules within each cell of an organism and in 2013 Professor Smith had his whole genome sequenced. He became the first person to donate his genome sequence under ‘open consent’ to the Personal Genome Project UK.

Genomics technologies have been at the heart of Professor Smith’s research for the past 15 years and he has been engaged in a range of interdisciplinary national and international collaborations, investigating antibiotic production by bacteria, human sleep and human nutrition.

Professor Debra Humphris, our Vice-Chancellor, said: “Huge congratulations to Colin. This is a highly prestigious event and an acknowledgement of his work and his global connections in the field of genomics.”

Professor Smith said: “It is a great honour to have been given the privilege to bring together some of the top scientists in this field to discuss recent breath-taking advances in our understanding of fundamental biological processes.”

Explaining our research on the BBC

The university’s Diabetes Research Group (DRB) featured on BBC South East’s Inside Out programme on 27 February.

Professor Adrian Bone, Professor of Cell and Molecular Biology and Head of the DRB, and his team explained cutting-edge research being undertaken at the university to improve treatment for a disease that, for Type 1 diabetes alone, affects 10,000 people in the South East.

To watch the programme go to the BBC’s iPlayer service and scan along to 17.40 mins.

BSS and NSS Survey

Unless you have been avoiding emails, not coming into university and not talking to anyone in the School you will, no doubt, be aware that the all undergraduate students are being asked to give their feedback on their university experience to date via either the Brighton Student Survey or the National Student Survey. This feedback is extremely important to both the school and university and helps us make changes for you.

You can read about some of the changes we made this academic year as a consequence of feedback from last year please do have a look at the your voice matters blog (https://blogs.brighton.ac.uk/yourvoicematters/school-of-pharmacy-and-biomolecular-sciences/ )

The Brighton Student Survey (BSS)

The BSS is the School and University’s main opportunity to gather feedback from all level 4 and 5 students so that we can understand what we are doing well and what we can improve.  The BSS is opened on Monday 6 February and will close at midnight on Monday 6 March, if you haven’t yet, please do take 10 minutes to complete the survey – there are only a few days left and every response matters. Completing the survey automatically enters you into a prize draw with the opportunity to win a £200 voucher from the university.

How do I complete the survey?

The National Student Survey (NSS)

The National Student Survey (NSS) is commissioned by the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) and is a national survey, undertaken by Ipsos MORI, which gathers the views of all final year undergraduates about what it has been like to study their course at their institution.

The survey comprises 27 questions in the survey cover teaching, assessment and feedback, learning opportunities, academic support, organisation and management, learning resources, personal development, and the student voice. There are also questions about careers, course delivery, work placements, welfare resources and facilities, social opportunities and overall satisfaction.

How do I complete the survey?

Because the school would really like to receive feedback from as many students as possible we have decided to donate £100 to the student society associated with the course that has the highest proportion of their students completing both the BSS and NSS so your society could receive up to £200 for 10 minutes of your time.

New insight into aged-related hearing loss

Scientists at the University of Brighton have moved a step closer to understanding the underlying cause of age-related hearing loss which affects 11 million people in the UK.
Hearing loss is believed to originate in non-sensory cells in the cochlea, the auditory portion of the inner ear containing the organ which produces nerve impulses in response to sound.
The cells are coupled together by ‘gap junctions’ which are formed of two proteins called connexin 26 and connexin 30. It is mutations or failures in these proteins that cause most cases of hearing loss.
However, experiments by our Sensory Neuroscience Research Group have shown that one particular mutation in the connexion 30 protein actually prevents deafness to high-frequency sound.
Professor Ian Russell, Professor of Neurobiology here at university and a member of the group, said: “This was a great surprise: The mutation should have impaired the function of the cochlea, not aided it.”
He said: “Other members of the research team are now making direct measurements from these supporting cells to understand how the mutation changes the properties of the gap junctions. They should obtain measurements that will enable us to understand how the mutation alters the electrical and mechanical properties of the cochlea and eventually lead to our understanding how sensitivity is preserved in a cochlea that would otherwise be decimated by age-related-hearing-loss.”
The Sensory Neuroscience Research Group’s findings were published on 21 February in Nature Communication. Continue reading