Enrol online

Congratulations to everyone who’s received an offer. If you’ve had your place confirmed, you’ll be able to enrol from today.

There are a few things to do before you get here, including the first stage of your enrolment and getting started with your email account and course materials.

Once you’ve enrolled online, you’ll also be able to see all the essential details about your course, including your start date, welcome events and a draft timetable.

Find out more about what you need to do before you start.

See you soon!

Paper towels win hands down over blow dryers

Paper towels are more efficient at drying and cleaning hands, according to research at the University of Brighton.

Despite the rising popularity of hand dryers in public restrooms the research shows traditional paper towels do the job better – and leave behind less bacteria.

The scientists are now calling on hospitals and other health care facilities to consider withdrawing air dryers altogether.

The research was conducted by Biomedical Science BSc(Hons) graduate Samantha Crockett, now  Senior Quality Assurance Microbiologist with GlaxoSmithKline, and Biological Sciences BSc(Hons) graduate Gregory Andreou, a microbiologist at Industrial Microbiological Services Limited. They were led by Dr Sarah Pitt, Principal Lecturer in the university’s School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences in Moulsecoomb, Brighton.

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Welcome to all of our new students!

When your place has been confirmed you officially become a University of Brighton student!
Keep an eye on your inbox as we’ll be keeping in touch with you by email to let you know more about:

  • activating your university user account and logging on to our online learning environment: student central
  • how to access pre-arrival information, check your start date and view our handy online guide to help prepare you for uni
  • our advice for new students as there’s lots to think about before starting uni – you’ll receive more in the post about this too in our Get Ready Guide
  • organising your accommodation: if you’re still looking for somewhere to live we can offer plenty of support and advice
  • organising your student finance and making a budget
  • joining a Facebook group for students on your campus.

You can also follow results day reactions on our InstagramStories. Tag us in your celebrations @uniofbrighton to be featured.

 

Explore your options through Clearing

Good luck to everyone receiving exam results this week!

If you’ve had a change of heart about what you want do next, or your exams have gone differently from what you expected, Clearing is an opportunity to assess your options and explore the possibilities. 

If you need help navigating your way through the Clearing process, check out our handy guide. Or call us on 01273 644000, we can help. 

You can also book on to our Clearing visit day at Moulsecoomb campus, where you’ll be studying, on  Wednesday 18 and Saturday 22 August. It’s a chance to look around and consider your next step. There’s a welcome talk and introduction, tour of the campus, advice about accommodation and student support and you will meet some of our academic staff in a Q&A.

Everyone who is looking to study with us in 2018 is welcome to attend. Course availability does change quickly in Clearing so if you’re not holding an offer get in touch first to confirm there is space on the course you are interested in before making travel arrangements.

Find out more and book your place here.

Try out teaching on a paid summer internship. Apply by 13 May. 

The University of Brighton Academies Trust in partnership with the University of Brighton is offering paid internships in four Sussex secondary schools for 4-weeks this summer. This opportunity could help you gain valuable experience teaching maths or physics if you are considering teaching as a career. 

As an intern you will be paid £300 a week and you can apply for this opportunity if you are in the penultimate year of a STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering or Maths) subject undergraduate degree. 

Activities may include working with experienced teachers on planning, shadowing and lesson observations; helping plan and deliver lessons; running projects and master classes for pupils and providing small group support for pupils.

The internship offers: 

  • • Hands on experience in a school for 4-weeks from mid-June to mid-July 2018
  • • The opportunity to earn while you learn. You will be paid £300 a week
  • • Full support from a dedicated mentor and support from subject teacher in your school
  • • The chance to experience mathematics or physics teaching before you commit to it as a career.

To find out more and apply by 13 May visit: www.brightonacademiestrust.org.uk/internship

My placement at GlaxoSmithKline

Emma Greening
BSc (Hons) Biomedical Science

“Choosing to do a placement year at GlaxoSmithKline was one of the best choices I could’ve made during my degree. Spending a year working in the management of Phase II-IV clinical trials has given me so many opportunities to learn about the drug development process, and play a key role in the progression of new therapies in the Immunoinflammation, Neurosciences and Dermatology therapy area. I was able to experience a scientific career away from the lab bench, and the skills I’ve gained during this time will be completely invaluable when returning for final year and when applying for graduate jobs. I really couldn’t recommend applying for an industrial placement year enough!”

An experience of a lifetime

Anna Marie Lawn, third year BSc(Hons) Ecology student tells us about her time volunteering over the summer.

From July-September 2017, I volunteered with the organisation of the Society for the Protection of Turtles in Northern Cyprus, working with the native green and loggerhead sea turtle species.

There, I worked and lived for 6 weeks with 25 students, sharing mattresses laid out on the floor of a room and outside the building on some inhabitants setting quiet alarms as not to wake up others on different shifts, and all equally in our permanent state of being covered head to toe in sand from the previous day. In the day, we made lunch out of whatever was in the communal fridge (mostly pita bread and halloumi) with two students who had been blessed with a day off, cooking each night using whatever vegetables we could find for a low enough price at a nearby market.

Our work day rotated between night and day shifts, consisting of 10-15 hour days. Night workers patrolled protected beaches from 8:30pm-7am, asking people on the beach after hours to leave, and finding adult female sea turtles who we would observe laying eggs and marking out the locations with GPS co-ordinates. Adults would be flipper tagged, have their carapace measured length and width and have their behaviour recorded; all in the dark with only our faint red head torches shining.

Day work consisted of opening and closing ring cages (used to protect the turtles from crabs, foxes and dogs that people would illegally bring to the protected beach) these would be opened according to the time of day and heat of the sand, allowing any hatchlings to leave their nest during the day when the sand is not too hot, and closing the cages in the evenings so the night workers could collect hatchlings for weighing, measuring and biopsying. They would be released the following night- when they are most likely to escape the watchful eyes of predators.

The bulk of day work involved excavating nests that had hatched, or record unsuccessful nests where no eggs hatched.

This work was extremely labour-intensive. One person would locate, and dig an ever-collapsing area of sand that the night workers had marked out 2 months before, after observing the females lay and marking the location of her egg chamber. Digging had to be done gently enough to avoid harming any hatchlings that could be over 1m deep in the cool softer sand. Once, I had over half of my body length head down into a hole in the sand with the Mediterranean sun pounding on my back, I would carefully remove fragments and unhatched eggs and pass them up to my colleagues, along with any survivors that had struggled to get out, or stuck under plastic caught in the nest. Fragments and eggs would be ordered under a range of criteria, along with information about the nest that would be used for the numerous research projects taking place.

Working closely with fellow students, (mainly ecologists and zoologists) watching endangered animals from hatchlings to adulthood emerge, some for the first time, is something that many of us had spent our lives waiting to see. It gives you a special bond to the people you work with, to the country and to the beaches which I worked on every day for all but 1 day off I had in 6 weeks. The extremely hard work we did across the 3 bases in Northern Cyprus (one dealt with over 12,000 hatchlings this season!) is worth the lifelong friends, the experiences and the satisfaction you gain when you release a hatchling that you pulled from the plastics littered across the beaches. This was the experience of a lifetime, and I cannot wait to go back.

How good is your garden for wildlife?

Our mammalian biologist Dr Dawn Scott and fellow experts are revealing the secret lives of animals and insects that live in gardens and lawns.

Watch out for Dr Scott who is featuring in a new BBC 4 TV programme ‘The British Garden: Life and Death on your lawn’.

Dr Scott said: “For this programme we assessed the biodiversity in eight gardens to see how different gardens support wildlife and what features of those gardens were the best for wildlife.”

Presented by Springwatch’s Chris Packham, the film looks “beneath the peonies and petunias” to reveal how male crickets bribe females for sex, how a robin’s red breast is actually war paint and how a single litter of foxes can have up to five different fathers.

The programme is scheduled for broadcast at 9pm on 11 July.