It’s students v staff in Radio 4 quiz

Students and staff from our school are some of the challengers going head-to-head on BBC Radio 4 quiz show The 3rd Degree on Monday.

The show, hosted by writer, comedian and actor Steve Punt, was recorded in front of an audience at the University’s Sallis Benney Theatre in January.

The University of Brighton episode is the fifth in a series of six and goes out on Monday at 3pm. It is repeated on Saturday, August 24 at 11pm. The show will remain on the BBC iPlayer for a week after its first broadcast.

After a rigorous selection process, students Sara Letham (Biomedical Science), Vincent Kane (Marketing Management) and Rachael Baylis (Globalisation: History, Politics, Culture) were chosen to represent the student team.

Dr Sarah Pitt (School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences) Dr Jon Watson (School of Humanities) and Phil Holden (Brighton Business School) made up the academic panel. Read More

Explore your options through Clearing

Good luck to everyone getting their A-Level results today!

If it doesn’t go to plan or you’ve had a change of heart about what you want do next, Clearing is a chance to change direction and make new plans.

If you need help navigating your way through the Clearing process, check out our handy online guide and see which courses you can still apply for. You can also call our Clearing hotline on 01273 644000 which is open now, and has extended hours from 7am to 7pm on results day.

If you’ve not yet visited the University of Brighton we have Clearing open days on Saturday 17th and Tuesday 20th August. You’ll be able to take a tour of the campus where you will be studying, get advice about accommodation, take part in a Q&A with academic staff and chat to students. Find out more about visiting us.

If you’re navigating big choices and big changes, we say: stay curious, explore, and trust yourself. The best journeys don’t always follow a map.

World-first study into microplastics in crustacean brains

University of Brighton researchers have carried out the world’s first study into microplastics in the brain of a crustacean species.

The research – conducted by University graduate Hannah Parker, Dr Neil Crooks, Dr Angelo Pernetta – showed that ingested microplastics remained in the brain of the velvet swimming crab at more consistent levels than in other areas such as the stomach and gills.

The presence of microplastics in the brain has possible implications for a range of behaviours in the crab, including predator avoidance, foraging and reproduction. Read More

Making the Most of Clearing Open Day

After initially planning on a gap year, I made a last-minute decision to go to university a week before results day. I got my results online, and found universities and courses I was interested in. After getting my results, Brighton was the first university that I phoned, and they were so friendly and helpful in answering all the questions I had. After some deliberating with another university, I decided that Brighton was the right place for me, and confirmed my offer to study Biomedical Science 🧬.

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Biomedical Science – An Alternative Route To Medicine

Biomedical Science – An alternative pathway in to medicine

Some of the most common questions I receive as an online ambassador are potential students asking whether it’s possible to transfer from Biomedical Science in to a medicine degree. While the answer is yes, having done so myself, the process can be confusing. So, I’ve decided to write this blog post to explain it, as well as clarify a few things I wish I knew when I started.

Hopefully this will make it a bit easier for those of you considering medicine!

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How drones and sirens can help save the rhino

University of Brighton researchers have found new ways to help save white rhinoceros from illegal poaching – using drones and sirens.

They investigated the most effective ways of deterring rhinos from danger areas such as near perimeter fences where poachers often operate and spent six months on a South African game reserve testing the most effective way of persuading the animals to move to safer areas.

Poaching, fuelled by the international trade in horn, has caused the deaths of over 1,000 white and black rhinoceros per year between 2013 and 2017 and South Africa alone lost 5,476 rhinoceros to poaching between 2006 and 2016.

Lead researcher Samuel Penny, PhD student and lecturer in the University’s School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences, exposed a population of southern white rhinos to drones, sirens and the sound of a swarm of bees to see which best encouraged them to move.

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They also tried scattering different smells including chilli to deter the rhinos from danger areas. Read More

National appointment for Brighton professor

Matteo Santin, the University of Brighton’s Professor of Tissue Regeneration, has been appointed a member of the science and technology strategic advisory board of the All Party Parliamentary Group for Longevity.

The group, which held its first meeting on 2 July, chaired by Lord Filkin CBE, aims to identify “the most effective ways to increase healthspan and democratise access to the ‘longevity dividend’ for citizens”. Read More