BMC ecology image competition winner

We are really proud of student William Mills, Ecology and Conservation MSci, who has been announced as one of the winners in the BMC Ecology Image Competition.

His photograph entitled ‘Meadow Brown and solitary bee’ was the winner in the Community, Population and Macroecology category in the global competition judged by Professor Zhigang Jiang from the Institute of Zoology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

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Just like wine, humans can be better with age

A Brighton scientist who helped develop anti-ageing compounds based on those found in red wine and chocolate is to explain how close we are to alleviating and preventing old age degenerative diseases.

Professor Lizzy Ostler, the University of Brighton’s Professor of Chemical Biology in our school, and a member of the University of Brighton’s Centre for Stress and Age-Related Disease, is giving her inaugural lecture on 20 March.

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Taking a stand against cancer

Two University of Brighton scientists are joining a pop-up stand in Brighton’s Churchill Square shopping centre on Friday (1 Feb) as part of events to mark next Monday’s (4 Feb) World Cancer Day.

Marta Falcinelli, PhD researcher in the University’s School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences (PABS), is passionate about fighting the disease and will be talking to members of the public at the Cancer Research UK (CRUK) event.

Marta joined the University’s Stress & Cancer group in 2016, fulfilling her ambition: “I have always been intrigued by science and at university I started to be very interested in molecular biology and scientific investigation, dreaming to perform experiments and work in a lab.

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City network will boost health innovation and business

University of Brighton researchers are joining forces with entrepreneurs and community groups to turn Brighton and Hove into a focal point for health interventions.

The social and commercial network in the Brighton and Hove area will be tasked with improving health, accelerating innovation and enhancing competitiveness.

The University’s Healthy Futures will be the platform for new partnerships which will search for and research new disease preventions, diagnoses, pioneering treatments and breakthrough innovations. The collaborations will also foster high-skill training and jobs.

Professor Matteo Santin, Academic Lead for Healthy Futures, said: “We believe that in the long term the city has the potential to emerge as a model city for health enterprise where societal needs are addressed through pioneering approaches and where organisations thrive through public and private investment.

“As a non-profit organisation with a multidisciplinary expertise, our University is in a privileged position to make this happen.”

The academic/business partnerships will first listen to their respective needs and to those of the public. To this end, local companies, entrepreneurs and organisations are being invited to the inaugural Health Entrepreneurs’ Brunch at the Old Ship Hotel in Brighton on 19 December. Two similar events will be held at later dates. Read More

My six week expedition to Indonesia

Caroline Dunnett, a third year Ecology BSc(Hons) student talks about her expedition with Operation Wallacea in Indonesia.

“For 6 weeks over the summer of 2018, I travelled to Indonesia to a remote island called Hoga in the Sulawesi National Park. I spent my time there completing my open water P.A.D.I and collect data for my dissertation on Coral Reefs and their Interaction with Sponges.

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Fighting illness in old age – from Vietnam

University of Brighton scientists and partners in Vietnam have made a breakthrough in the delivery of a disease-fighting constituent of the spice turmeric.

Curcumin, extracted from turmeric, has anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities and has been used for the prevention and treatment of cancer, diabetes, neurodegeneration and cardiovascular disease; all diseases linked to ageing. The problem has been finding an effective way of delivering curcumin – but now scientists believe they have found a process that does. Read More

Brighton researchers aiming to save the whale – and humans

University of Brighton scientists have discovered a more environmentally-friendly way of preventing man-made toxins from leaching into the water system – using living organisms.

Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), now banned by most countries including the UK (1981), are still posing serious health risks and are suspected of causing the death of a new-born orca which made headlines around the world earlier this year when its mother Tahlequah carried the dead calf for 17 days.

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My experience as a placement student at Kew

Why did I decide to complete a placement year?

A placement year!? A WHOLE year of my life! These were some of the things that I pondered long and hard about when deciding whether I wanted to apply for a placement year or not. I decided that I wanted to get some experience of working in a scientific institution before graduating from my degree, keen to develop skills that I had learned during the first two years of studying Ecology at Brighton and put them to good use! In addition, I relished the prospect of learning new skills and techniques which would ultimately help me during my final year.

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