Explore our labs

If you haven’t had the chance to visit us you can still get a feel for what it’s like as a student here.

You can take a look around our specialist labs and see the sort of equipment our students use:

 

And if you want to speak to a current student to find out what it’s really like to study here, chat online brighton.ac.uk/chat

You can also speak to other applicants to find out what they think by visiting The Student Room, and take a look at the accommodation options online.

 

Taking a stand against cancer

Two University of Brighton scientists are joining a pop-up stand in Brighton’s Churchill Square shopping centre on Friday (1 Feb) as part of events to mark next Monday’s (4 Feb) World Cancer Day.

Marta Falcinelli, PhD researcher in the University’s School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences (PABS), is passionate about fighting the disease and will be talking to members of the public at the Cancer Research UK (CRUK) event.

Marta joined the University’s Stress & Cancer group in 2016, fulfilling her ambition: “I have always been intrigued by science and at university I started to be very interested in molecular biology and scientific investigation, dreaming to perform experiments and work in a lab.

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City network will boost health innovation and business

University of Brighton researchers are joining forces with entrepreneurs and community groups to turn Brighton and Hove into a focal point for health interventions.

The social and commercial network in the Brighton and Hove area will be tasked with improving health, accelerating innovation and enhancing competitiveness.

The University’s Healthy Futures will be the platform for new partnerships which will search for and research new disease preventions, diagnoses, pioneering treatments and breakthrough innovations. The collaborations will also foster high-skill training and jobs.

Professor Matteo Santin, Academic Lead for Healthy Futures, said: “We believe that in the long term the city has the potential to emerge as a model city for health enterprise where societal needs are addressed through pioneering approaches and where organisations thrive through public and private investment.

“As a non-profit organisation with a multidisciplinary expertise, our University is in a privileged position to make this happen.”

The academic/business partnerships will first listen to their respective needs and to those of the public. To this end, local companies, entrepreneurs and organisations are being invited to the inaugural Health Entrepreneurs’ Brunch at the Old Ship Hotel in Brighton on 19 December. Two similar events will be held at later dates. Read More

Fighting illness in old age – from Vietnam

University of Brighton scientists and partners in Vietnam have made a breakthrough in the delivery of a disease-fighting constituent of the spice turmeric.

Curcumin, extracted from turmeric, has anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities and has been used for the prevention and treatment of cancer, diabetes, neurodegeneration and cardiovascular disease; all diseases linked to ageing. The problem has been finding an effective way of delivering curcumin – but now scientists believe they have found a process that does. Read More

Athena SWAN silver award for our school

The university’s School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Science (PABS) has received a Silver Award from Advance HE’s highly-regarded SWAN Charter, which promotes gender equality in the representation, progression and success of staff and students in Higher Education.

The Silver Award was granted in recognition of actions implemented to advance careers of women in science over the past few years. Read More

Brighton researchers aiming to save the whale – and humans

University of Brighton scientists have discovered a more environmentally-friendly way of preventing man-made toxins from leaching into the water system – using living organisms.

Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), now banned by most countries including the UK (1981), are still posing serious health risks and are suspected of causing the death of a new-born orca which made headlines around the world earlier this year when its mother Tahlequah carried the dead calf for 17 days.

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On the brink of living beyond 120

Science could be on the brink of fulfilling humans’ dream of longer healthier lives, according to a University of Brighton expert on ageing.

Professor Richard Faragher, the university’s Professor of Biogerontology, will discuss the latest research findings from diet and exercise to the medicines of tomorrow at a New Scientist Live event on 20 September.

Professor Faragher, from the university’s School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences, holds the Chair of Biogerontology and is president-elect of the American Aging Association. He was the first British citizen to be elected to the Board of Directors of the American Federation for Aging Research, the leading US non-profit organisation supporting and advancing healthy aging through biomedical research, and he has been Chair of the British Society for Research on Ageing and the International Association of Biomedical Gerontology.

Professor Faragher will also explore the ethical aspects of ageing research: “Views on living forever are as interesting and varied as the science itself.”

New Scientist Live is an award-winning festival of ideas and discoveries. The four-day event at London ExCeL will feature more than 110 speakers giving thought-provoking talks on everything from overcoming chronic pain to boosting your brain with magnetism.

Slime mould, books and artificial intelligence

The University of Brighton has played a pivotal role in the growth of slime mould for an innovative installation at the Brighton Digital Festival.

Digital artists Cesar Baio and Lucy HG Solomon – who form the collective Cesar & Lois with collaborator Jeremy Speed Schwartz – used the university’s microbiology laboratory to develop the Physarum polychephalum (slime mould) that features in their installation Degenerative Cultures, one element of the wider Uncommon Natures exhibition.

Cesar and Lucy worked closely with the University of Brighton’s Joao Inacio, a senior lecturer in pharmacy and biomolecular sciences, in the course of preparing their microbiological samples for the art display. Joao said: “It was really fun to meet and work with Cesar and Lucy in our lab.”

Uncommon Natures showcases the artists who are finalists of the Lumen Prize for Digital Art, which “celebrates the very best art created with technology”.

Jack Addis, creative director of Lumen Prize, said: “We’re excited to bring together this selection of shortlisted 2018 Lumen Prize artists and to celebrate artists working with a variety of media and mediums.” Read More