Headshot of Bhavik Patel smiling

Distance teaching – so how’s it going?

Here, Professor Bhavik Patel, Professor of Clinical and Bioanalytical Chemistry in the Centre for Stress and Age-Related Disease, details how he’s coping – and how he’s found his patio windows at home are perfect substitutes for white boards:

The transition to teaching and assessing students at distance practically over the course of 24 hours has certainly brought out many mixed emotions. There is the concern of how this format of distance teaching and assessment will be received by the students and that we have limited experience of distance learning. A part of me is up for the challenge of exploring creative ways to teach and assess our students.

 

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Photo of Dr Sarah Pitt

We’re making waves – around the globe

University of Brighton researchers and academics have been in demand from media around the world in recent weeks on a variety of subjects, but mainly informing the debate about the coronavirus.

Dr Clare Weeden, Principal Lecturer from the Tourism, Hospitality and Events Research and Enterprise Group in the School of Sport and Service Management, was interviewed by The Daily Telegraph and quoted in their article on how tourism is coping in the face of the infection outbreak.

Jennifer Holland, Lecturer in Competitive Marketing in the same school, wrote an article on how the cruise liner industry has been disrupted in The Conversation. Holland was interviewed by BBC radio and the feature was broadcast by more than 50 BBC stations around the UK.

And Dr Sarah Pitt, Principal Lecturer in the University’s School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences and diagnostic virologist with the Institute of Biomedical Science, was interviewed by BBC South East Today and also BBC Radio Stoke about the coronavirus and invited to explain how people in contact with those with the infection are being traced and what precautions people should take.

Meanwhile, Professor Richard Faragher, Professor of Professor of Biogerontology from the Centre for Stress and Age-Related Disease, also featured in The Conversation on the subject of ‘How to add five healthy years to UK life expectancy’. His article was reprinted by a number of publications worldwide including the Metro newspaper in the UK, the Paris Guardian, the Shanghai Sun and the Nigeria Sun.

Paul Levy’s The Conversation article on ‘Why laptops could be facing the end of the line’ garnered over 133,000 reads and was one of the most widely read on the website for February. The Senior Lecturer in our Brighton Business School saw his article go viral – it was republished by a number of media including CNA (Asia, Australia and Middle East),  Knowridge Science Report and EconoTimes.

Jamie Mcluskey

What I’ve found…

Jamie McCluskey, Biomedical Science BSc(Hons) graduate, now studying Medicine at BSMS, shares his thoughts about his time here with us.

Choosing to study at Brighton was easy. For me the most important thing when choosing a university was whether I’d actually enjoy living in the city where the university was based, Brighton is easily one of the most fun and vibrant places in the country! That combined with the fact that Brighton offered a biomedical science course accredited by the Institute of Biomedical Scientists meant it was an obvious choice. 

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It’s students v staff in Radio 4 quiz

Students and staff from our school are some of the challengers going head-to-head on BBC Radio 4 quiz show The 3rd Degree on Monday.

The show, hosted by writer, comedian and actor Steve Punt, was recorded in front of an audience at the University’s Sallis Benney Theatre in January.

The University of Brighton episode is the fifth in a series of six and goes out on Monday at 3pm. It is repeated on Saturday, August 24 at 11pm. The show will remain on the BBC iPlayer for a week after its first broadcast.

After a rigorous selection process, students Sara Letham (Biomedical Science), Vincent Kane (Marketing Management) and Rachael Baylis (Globalisation: History, Politics, Culture) were chosen to represent the student team.

Dr Sarah Pitt (School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences) Dr Jon Watson (School of Humanities) and Phil Holden (Brighton Business School) made up the academic panel. Read More

Making the Most of Clearing Open Day

After initially planning on a gap year, I made a last-minute decision to go to university a week before results day. I got my results online, and found universities and courses I was interested in. After getting my results, Brighton was the first university that I phoned, and they were so friendly and helpful in answering all the questions I had. After some deliberating with another university, I decided that Brighton was the right place for me, and confirmed my offer to study Biomedical Science 🧬.

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Biomedical Science – An Alternative Route To Medicine

Biomedical Science – An alternative pathway in to medicine

Some of the most common questions I receive as an online ambassador are potential students asking whether it’s possible to transfer from Biomedical Science in to a medicine degree. While the answer is yes, having done so myself, the process can be confusing. So, I’ve decided to write this blog post to explain it, as well as clarify a few things I wish I knew when I started.

Hopefully this will make it a bit easier for those of you considering medicine!

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National appointment for Brighton professor

Matteo Santin, the University of Brighton’s Professor of Tissue Regeneration, has been appointed a member of the science and technology strategic advisory board of the All Party Parliamentary Group for Longevity.

The group, which held its first meeting on 2 July, chaired by Lord Filkin CBE, aims to identify “the most effective ways to increase healthspan and democratise access to the ‘longevity dividend’ for citizens”. Read More

How the garden snail could help solve the antibiotics crisis

A Brighton scientist has made a breakthrough in the search for new antibiotics – courtesy of the common garden snail.

Dr Sarah Pitt, taken by Simon Dack

Researchers have suspected that snail mucus contains antibacterial properties but the University of Brighton’s Dr Sarah Pitt has conclusively identified proteins that could directly lead to the development of an antibiotic cream to treat deep burn wounds, and an aerosol for lung infections suffered regularly by patients with cystic fibrosis (CF).

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