Image of virus

COVID 19: a lesson on why vaccines are so vital

The Coronavirus crisis has highlighted the critical need for families to keep up with vaccinations, according to a Brighton immunologist.

Dr Nadia Terrazzini said: “We are living through the biggest case study of what the world would look like without vaccines – they are the single most effective way to protect us from infections.

“This crisis will be over and we will probably all come out if it feeling different people, on many levels. And it will, hopefully, make us all more aware of the importance of vaccines and the role of immunology research.”

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Dr Nadia Terrazzini

Remote teaching: It felt like a jump into cold water

Here, Dr Nadia Terrazzini, Senior Lecturer in Clinical Immunology, tells of the trials of switching to remote teaching.

“I feel like I have started a new job. Only last week I was busy working in the lab with my final year students who had to complete the final experiments for their lab projects.

And on Monday morning there I was setting up the laptop that I was lucky to get from the school, in our designed, personal area in a house I share with hubby and three kids (all connected to internet for work and home schooling) and joining a meeting on Microsoft Teams (MT).

It felt like a jump in cold water. I even forgot to switch on my camera at first (sorry team) as I was still hot and flustered after just completing an online PE session with my daughter (PE with Joe Wicks!).

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Headshot of Bhavik Patel smiling

Distance teaching – so how’s it going?

Here, Professor Bhavik Patel, Professor of Clinical and Bioanalytical Chemistry in the Centre for Stress and Age-Related Disease, details how he’s coping – and how he’s found his patio windows at home are perfect substitutes for white boards:

The transition to teaching and assessing students at distance practically over the course of 24 hours has certainly brought out many mixed emotions. There is the concern of how this format of distance teaching and assessment will be received by the students and that we have limited experience of distance learning. A part of me is up for the challenge of exploring creative ways to teach and assess our students.

 

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Jamie Mcluskey

What I’ve found…

Jamie McCluskey, Biomedical Science BSc(Hons) graduate, now studying Medicine at BSMS, shares his thoughts about his time here with us.

Choosing to study at Brighton was easy. For me the most important thing when choosing a university was whether I’d actually enjoy living in the city where the university was based, Brighton is easily one of the most fun and vibrant places in the country! That combined with the fact that Brighton offered a biomedical science course accredited by the Institute of Biomedical Scientists meant it was an obvious choice. 

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Chloe smiling with young man

Fund winner Chloe’s South African game reserve experience

Chloe Morel recently visited South Africa as part of her International Experience. The International Experience Fund is a fund  kindly supported by Santander Universities and other generous donors, which helps eligible undergraduate students take advantage of opportunities overseas such as work placements, volunteering or studying abroad.

Chloe tells the story

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Photo of trout swimming in river

Are superfoods damaging fish communities?

Brown trout in our rivers are in danger of being poisoned by a toxin produced in the watercress farming industry, according to new research at the University of Brighton.

Penethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) potentially is leaching into water courses and researchers are concerned the toxin can kill trout embryos and cause deformities.

Dr Neil Crooks, from the University’s Centre for Aquatic Environments, who led the research said: “Results show the need to accurately quantify and monitor environmental levels of PEITC in the environment.”

Dr Crooks, with Asa White, a PhD student, and Centre colleagues Dr Angelo Pernetta and Professor Chris Joyce, Professor of Ecology, looked into the sources of PEITC.

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How the garden snail could help solve the antibiotics crisis

A Brighton scientist has made a breakthrough in the search for new antibiotics – courtesy of the common garden snail.

Dr Sarah Pitt, taken by Simon Dack

Researchers have suspected that snail mucus contains antibacterial properties but the University of Brighton’s Dr Sarah Pitt has conclusively identified proteins that could directly lead to the development of an antibiotic cream to treat deep burn wounds, and an aerosol for lung infections suffered regularly by patients with cystic fibrosis (CF).

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Dawn Scott 2017 BBC shoot

Why we’re running out of time to reduce climate change

A University of Brighton expert in mammal ecology and conservation has warned that we must act immediately to reduce the effects of climate change.

Professor Dawn Scott, who has featured on BBC nature programmes such as Springwatch and Winterwatch, shared her thoughts on climate change in the latest episode of the University of Brighton’s ‘Catching Up With…’ podcast series.

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