On the brink of living beyond 120

Science could be on the brink of fulfilling humans’ dream of longer healthier lives, according to a University of Brighton expert on ageing.

Professor Richard Faragher, the university’s Professor of Biogerontology, will discuss the latest research findings from diet and exercise to the medicines of tomorrow at a New Scientist Live event on 20 September.

Professor Faragher, from the university’s School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences, holds the Chair of Biogerontology and is president-elect of the American Aging Association. He was the first British citizen to be elected to the Board of Directors of the American Federation for Aging Research, the leading US non-profit organisation supporting and advancing healthy aging through biomedical research, and he has been Chair of the British Society for Research on Ageing and the International Association of Biomedical Gerontology.

Professor Faragher will also explore the ethical aspects of ageing research: “Views on living forever are as interesting and varied as the science itself.”

New Scientist Live is an award-winning festival of ideas and discoveries. The four-day event at London ExCeL will feature more than 110 speakers giving thought-provoking talks on everything from overcoming chronic pain to boosting your brain with magnetism.

Tochukwu Ozulumba

Soapbox scientist

A Brighton scientist is leaving her laboratory to stand on a soapbox and explain to passers-by how nanomaterials – a thousand times smaller than the diameter of a human hair – can help fight infections.

Tochukwu Ozulumba, a PhD candidate in the University of Brighton’s School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences, is one of 12 science, technology, engineering and maths scientists taking part in a Soapbox Science event on Brighton seafront.

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Determining the sex of human remains – using tooth enamel

Scientists at the University of Brighton have discovered a new method of determining the sex of human remains – by testing tooth enamel. DNA sequencing is currently the most common method but this can be expensive, time-consuming, and often depends on finding a good quality sample. The new method is quicker, cheaper, and uses tooth enamel, the most durable human body tissue and the hardest tissue in the human body. It survives burial well, even when the rest of the skeleton or DNA has decayed.

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Come and visit us this winter

It might be cold outside but don’t let that stop you visiting us this winter!

If you’re considering starting an undergraduate course here in 2018, why not sign up to one of our campus tours taking place during December and January and find out more about what it’s like study at Brighton?

The tours will give you the chance to explore the campus where your course of interest is based, view our facilities and talk to our staff and students.

Find out more and book onto a tour <link to: https://www.brighton.ac.uk/studying-here/visit-us/campus-tours/index.aspx>

Why treating stress could help beat cancer

The stress of being told you have breast cancer may be reducing the potency of drugs used to treat the disease, according to new research by the University of Brighton.

Early trials show stress-relieving medications may increase the efficacy of chemotherapy and by doing so, improve recovery. Managing stress and anxiety at an early stage, researchers say, could become routine.

Dr Melanie Flint

Dr Melanie Flint, Reader in Cancer Biology at the University of Brighton’s School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences, has been studying the impact stress hormones have on patients, and the effect chronic psychological stress has on disease progression, as well as response to drug treatment. Dr Flint said: “Stress hormones are highly potent and can interact with almost every cell in the body including normal, cancer and immune cells.”

Her research has shown that DNA can be damaged as a result of the interaction between our cells and stress hormones, leading to cell transformation: “A diagnosis of breast cancer is a cause of a great deal of stress, which in itself, is a significant reason for stress management to be considered early on.”

Melanie is part of a team of scientists at the University of Brighton researching breast cancer. Dr Flint collaborates with Professor Dame Lesley Fallowfield, Professor of Psycho-Oncology, who will be speaking at the British Science Festival on the 5 September, in an event titled, ‘Risk and uncertainty in breast cancer treatment’.

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