My six week expedition to Indonesia

Caroline Dunnett, a third year Ecology BSc(Hons) student talks about her expedition with Operation Wallacea in Indonesia.

“For 6 weeks over the summer of 2018, I travelled to Indonesia to a remote island called Hoga in the Sulawesi National Park. I spent my time there completing my open water P.A.D.I and collect data for my dissertation on Coral Reefs and their Interaction with Sponges.

Read More

Brighton researchers aiming to save the whale – and humans

University of Brighton scientists have discovered a more environmentally-friendly way of preventing man-made toxins from leaching into the water system – using living organisms.

Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), now banned by most countries including the UK (1981), are still posing serious health risks and are suspected of causing the death of a new-born orca which made headlines around the world earlier this year when its mother Tahlequah carried the dead calf for 17 days.

Read More

On the brink of living beyond 120

Science could be on the brink of fulfilling humans’ dream of longer healthier lives, according to a University of Brighton expert on ageing.

Professor Richard Faragher, the university’s Professor of Biogerontology, will discuss the latest research findings from diet and exercise to the medicines of tomorrow at a New Scientist Live event on 20 September.

Professor Faragher, from the university’s School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences, holds the Chair of Biogerontology and is president-elect of the American Aging Association. He was the first British citizen to be elected to the Board of Directors of the American Federation for Aging Research, the leading US non-profit organisation supporting and advancing healthy aging through biomedical research, and he has been Chair of the British Society for Research on Ageing and the International Association of Biomedical Gerontology.

Professor Faragher will also explore the ethical aspects of ageing research: “Views on living forever are as interesting and varied as the science itself.”

New Scientist Live is an award-winning festival of ideas and discoveries. The four-day event at London ExCeL will feature more than 110 speakers giving thought-provoking talks on everything from overcoming chronic pain to boosting your brain with magnetism.

Tochukwu Ozulumba

Soapbox scientist

A Brighton scientist is leaving her laboratory to stand on a soapbox and explain to passers-by how nanomaterials – a thousand times smaller than the diameter of a human hair – can help fight infections.

Tochukwu Ozulumba, a PhD candidate in the University of Brighton’s School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences, is one of 12 science, technology, engineering and maths scientists taking part in a Soapbox Science event on Brighton seafront.

Read More