Why treating stress could help beat cancer

The stress of being told you have breast cancer may be reducing the potency of drugs used to treat the disease, according to new research by the University of Brighton.

Early trials show stress-relieving medications may increase the efficacy of chemotherapy and by doing so, improve recovery. Managing stress and anxiety at an early stage, researchers say, could become routine.

Dr Melanie Flint

Dr Melanie Flint, Reader in Cancer Biology at the University of Brighton’s School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences, has been studying the impact stress hormones have on patients, and the effect chronic psychological stress has on disease progression, as well as response to drug treatment. Dr Flint said: “Stress hormones are highly potent and can interact with almost every cell in the body including normal, cancer and immune cells.”

Her research has shown that DNA can be damaged as a result of the interaction between our cells and stress hormones, leading to cell transformation: “A diagnosis of breast cancer is a cause of a great deal of stress, which in itself, is a significant reason for stress management to be considered early on.”

Melanie is part of a team of scientists at the University of Brighton researching breast cancer. Dr Flint collaborates with Professor Dame Lesley Fallowfield, Professor of Psycho-Oncology, who will be speaking at the British Science Festival on the 5 September, in an event titled, ‘Risk and uncertainty in breast cancer treatment’.

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The wild furry urbanites

Dr Dawn Scott, Principal Lecturer in the School of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences will be sharing her research findings on urban mammals, as well as some unexpected stories about what they (and their researchers) get up to in the city at night, at this year’s British Science Festival on Wednesday 6 September.

The British Science Festival 2017 begins on September 5 and runs through till September 9.

Book your free tickets here: https://www.britishsciencefestival.or…

Open Consent: Genetics and the loss of anonymity

Professor Colin Smith, Professor of Functional Genomics, is the first person to donate his complete genome sequence under ‘open consent’ in the UK – waiving any rights to anonymity.

Join the discussion with Colin at the British Science Festival on the 8 September to understand the reasons for his decision, and why this approach will ultimately benefit the public if more people follow suit.

Location: Brighton City, Old Courtroom theatre

Duration: 17:00 – 18:00

Date: Friday 8 September 2017

Book your place now!

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Clearing 2017

Good luck to everyone receiving A-Level results tomorrow!

If your exams have gone differently from the way you expected, or you have had a change of heart about the course you want to do then Clearing can be a great way to start that journey.

Our Clearing hotline will be open on Thursday from 7am
Call us on 01273 644000

Full advice about Clearing can be found on the University of Brighton website:
www.brighton.ac.uk/clearing

Get to know us better and visit us at a Clearing information day.
You’ll meet academics from your subject, take a tour of your campus and facilities and get advice about student finance, university life and accommodation.
Find out more about Clearing information days.

BBC Springwatch on garden animals

University of Brighton mammalian biologist is calling on the public for ‘animal stories from the garden’ for research and a special feature for BBC Two’s forthcoming Springwatch series.

Dr Dawn Scott and her team are studying interactions between foxes, hedgehogs, badgers, cats and dogs in the presence or absence of food in people’s gardens.

Dr Scott, Principal Lecturer in the university’s School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences, said: “Many people support wildlife in their gardens by providing food for them. However, we don’t yet fully understand how providing food can affect the interactions between wildlife.

“It is not always known what animals actually end up eating this extra food or if the animals compete to get access to it. Foxes and hedgehogs have been seen to feed from the same bowl but we have also seen animals come into conflict over the food provided.

“The project will be focused on interactions between foxes, badgers and hedgehogs, but we are also interested in interactions between the same species, i.e. fox and another fox, and also between pets.”

Findings from the research will feature in BBCs Two’s Springwatch which is scheduled to air from 29 May to 15 June.

 

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“Making Sense of Your Science” career workshop – Sunday 3 July

SEB MAIN MEETING 2016, BRIGHTON CONFERENCE CENTRE

SUNDAY 3RD JULY, 10.30 – 15.30

MAKING SENSE OF YOUR SCIENCE

£27 including lunch

Making “Sense of Your Science” is a Career Workshop being held at the Brighton Conference Centre during the Society for Experimental Biology’s conference on Sunday 3rd July. This one-day event is being made available to local PhD students and postdocs and includes a panel of media professionals who will give you helpful advice about how to communicate your science to the media, as well as more general rules about how to present your science in writing and face-to-face. See below for more detail of the programme.

Sign up by 4pm, 27 June

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