Blood Culture

Two lecturers from our school, Claire Marriott and Simonne Weeks, have played a part in the development of Blood Culture, an arts podcast.

Lance Dann, Course Leader BA (Hons) TV & Digital Media Production here at Brighton, created the podcast and explains more:

Over the weekend, Blood Culture, a University of Brighton related project was the top arts or drama podcast in the UK, knocking The Archers off its seemingly permanent Number 1 position (it also broke into the Top 40 of all UK podcasts briefly giving Russell Brand a run for his money).

While not directly a UoB project, research derived from the series will be, and several members of our staff were involved in its creation. These include myself as its creator, Phil Connolly who developed the story with me and created a series of supporting films, Claire Marriott and Simone Weeks who provided consultation on bio-medical issues and Marley Cole, who designed sound for one of our episodes.

Blood Culture is a techno thriller that addresses issues of the commodification of the body, developments in stem cell science, the exploitation of interns in the workplace and the relationship of capital to medicine in a postdigital environment.  It also involves a fair few fist fights, some tough female protagonists, a series of related web-sites and even an interactive SMS game. The whole project was supported by The Wellcome Trust.

You can watch the trailer for Blood Culture here.

 

Investigating Lyme disease on the South Downs

Lyme borreliosis is an infectious disease caused by the bacterium Borelia burgdorferi. The bacterium is transmissible between hosts through the bite of blood-sucking ticks which parasitise mammals, birds, and humans. Landscape features, such as woodland or grassland, affect the movement of host animals, however, a knowledge gap exists on the extent of LB spread in Southern England. Mr Jo Middleton, Dr Anja Rott & Dr Ian Cooper presented a poster at the Microbiology Society annual conference in Edinburgh a few weeks ago, detailing their on-going research in to this neglected disease.

Investigating Lyme disease on the South Downs

 

Early morning mist on fields and trees