Status Update Emails: How Many Do You Need?

Email Marketing is a way to reach consumers directly through email, it is used to promote products and service but also to support the transaction of an order placed by a customer, (Ward,2016).

Once you have placed an order with Missguided, a UK based online multi-channel retailer with 3 million followers across multiple platforms (Baldwin, 2015), you receive a large number of status update emails regarding your order. To be precise Missguided send, one confirmation email, one email stating your order has been dispatched, a further 3 emails containing information about the delivery of your parcel and lastly, one follow up email asking if you are pleased with the items you have received.

Email one: 

screen-shot-2016-11-04-at-17-02-25

screen-shot-2016-11-04-at-17-02-45

screen-shot-2016-11-04-at-17-04-16

Order Confirmation emails verify that an order has been successfully placed and the payment has been transferred. They serve an important purpose as they provide the customer with reassurance and reinforce the brands reliability, in fact, 64% of consumers consider order confirmation emails the most valuable in their inbox, (Smith, 2015). Today, if a customer doesn’t receive a confirmation email after placing an order it would probably cause some post-purchase anxiety and make them feel uncertain about the company they have purchased from.

The Missguided confirmation email is attractive and bold. The image and the colour red grab the reader’s attention and convey a high fashion, modern perception of the brand to the customer. I would definitely read this email to check the details of my order and the amount of money coming out of my bank account. The email has also been personalised so I know that it is for my eyes only, they do this by saying ‘Hi Rebecca Adlington’ and supply me with a order number. The informal language used throughout the email makes the clothing company seem friendly and approachable and would also appeal to their target market.

The email serves an important purpose, but it also a way for Missguided to entice their customers to sign up to their newsletter. They take up a quarter of the email space with a large picture and links to opt-in to receive further emails and SMS messages. Research shows that only 29% of customers opt in to emails and other messages, compared to 51% who say they would opt out, (Chahal, 2014). It is therefore likely that most customers will ignore this section. For those who are generally interested in finding out more, this section could be helpful, the link takes you to a landing page that includes details on how you can opt-in and keep up with the latest fashion trends. The email also include links to social media to persuade customers to view more items in their range even after they have placed an order.

Delivery Emails: 

Once the order has been confirmed, you receive a further 4 emails regarding the status of your delivery. In my opinion this number could be cut down, the information on the individual emails is helpful, for example they state the time the delivery will arrive and notify you when the delivery has reached its destination. However it’s probably not essential that the customer needs to know that ‘the parcel is with the local courier’ or ‘it has left the warehouse’. Some customers may find this reassuring and like to follow each and every step of their delivery, but for others it could be seen as annoying.

When you make a purchase with Amazon you are only sent three emails that include confirmation, shipping and delivery information. The process with Amazon seems more streamlined and you don’t receive individual emails at each stage in the process.

Email 6: 

screen-shot-2016-11-04-at-17-27-01

screen-shot-2016-11-04-at-17-27-16

screen-shot-2016-11-04-at-17-27-29

This is the final email you collect after receiving your order from Missguided. The objective of this email is to encourage the customer to leave feedback on the items they have received. Again, they use a large image as a centrepiece to grab your attention and in this case, it is a picture of one of the items I ordered, so it is personalised to my shopping basket. There is also a list with a number of links to click through to the other products you ordered so you can also comment on those. I believe the black dress was the centrepiece for this email as it was the most expensive item I ordered. The call to action ‘rate me’ link takes you through to a landing page like this:

screen-shot-2016-11-04-at-17-35-25

The landing page dosen’t stand out to me, it has no real headline and the layout is very bland. The style from the email is not maintained to the landing page in my opinion. The page not only asks questions about the product but it also asks about your style preferences and personal information such as your age and location. If this is to be completed, it allows Missguided to compare and store your data to help them improve in the future. I usually ignore these emails, unless I am not satisfied with the product. If the quality is poor I will leave a review or take to social media to advise fellow customers not to make the same mistake.

How can they improve? 

  • Design one informative email with regards to the delivery and work with Hermes to streamline the process so the customer isn’t bombarded with emails regarding their parcel
  • Ensure that the landing pad is as attractive as the email, customers will loose interested if it looks to lengthy or doesn’t seem interesting to them
  • They could include a competition or social media campaign to make the emails more attractive to the consumer
  • Encourage customers to sign up to a loyalty program instead of just leaving feedback as this offers something for them as-well.
  • Some of the images could be videos, the movement and sound would make the emails more appealing

References:

Baldwin, C., 2015. Missguided reports £5.5m profits as it launches concession in Nordstrom. [Online] Available at: https://www.retail-week.com/sectors/fashion/missguided-reports-55m-profits-as-it-launches-concession-in-nordstrom/5073739.article [Accessed 1 November 2016].

Chahal, M., 2014. Consumers less likely to ‘opt in’ to marketing than to ‘opt out’. [Online] Available at: https://www.marketingweek.com/2014/05/07/consumers-less-likely-to-opt-in-to-marketing-than-to-opt-out/ [Accessed 2 November 2016].

Smith, L., 2015. Best Practices for Optimizing Order Confirmation Emails. [Online] Available at: https://litmus.com/blog/best-practices-for-optimizing-order-confirmation-emails [Accessed 2 Novemer 2016 ].

Ward, S., 2016. Email Marketing. [Online] Available at: https://www.thebalance.com/email-marketing-2948346 [Accessed 3 Novemeber 2016].

 

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *