Protein World: A Lesson in Social Media Damage Control? 

In the spring of 2015, Protein World (a supplier of workout supplements) unveiled their “Are You Beach Body Ready?” campaign, renting advertising space on billboards and trains, supplemented by postings on social media – most notably via Twitter. The campaign poster included a slender, toned, young woman donned in only a bikini, asking the audience a simple question – are you beach body ready?

This move served to contradictingly both comply with and completely subvert the findings outlined by Noort and Willemsen (2011), in which the key take-away was that companies can help to mitigate damage through responding quickly and directly to negative online conversations, while striving to “improve brand evaluations by showing that they take the problems of customers seriously”. But surprisingly, not taking customers seriously (but still taking the time to respond to them) appeared to work in their favour, with the company reportedly generating an additional £1 Million in sales as a result of the backlash (Brinded, 2015). But this raises a question difficult to answer – would they have been more successful if they hadn’t taken to insulting and marginalising a large section of the public?

Source: Protein World: A Lesson in Social Media Damage Control? 

The importance of good management of the effects of social media’s on the reputation of small businesses | Digital Marketing Blog

Social media is now a major force in today’s society with people of all ages, backgrounds and social groups. Fuchs (2014) explains that now more than ever we need to understand social media and the impact it is having on our lives and how it is such a useful marketing tool if used effectively. Fuchs 2014 book explains that people need crucial knowledge to help us navigate throughout the complex digital media landscape that is now present. This applies also to businesses, especially small businesses, as reputation is a crucial part of business enterprise risk management (Arnold, 2006). A business’ success is based on its reputation by many consumers and is measured by how much it is trusted by consumers, stakeholders and employees. When consumers hear good things about a business they are develop brand trust even before actually experiencing the businesses service. With the introduction of social media such as ‘Twitter’ consumers are able to voice their opinions on companies and brands more openly. Negative reviews on social media towards large businesses/brands are often ignored and disregarded compared to comments regarding smaller business/brands that is not so prominent in the public arena. The effect of a bad reviews/complaints broadcast on social media regarding small business can have highly detrimental effects.

Personal recommendations is an extremely important marketing tool that has the potential to significantly increase the revenue of companies but also has the ability to negatively effect a company’s revenue. However, with the rapid increase in use of the Internet and social media, negative publicity is spread very differently from ‘word-of-mouth’. Consumers are now more than likely maybe even expected to voice their opinions online with big companies notably Tesco and ASOS having twitter accounts to enable unhappy customers to scan for a deal.

Source: The importance of good management of the effects of social media’s on the reputation of small businesses | Digital Marketing Blog

Digital Word of Mouth and the Power of Client Reviews, Good and Bad, in Professional Services. | Alex N’s Digital Marketing Blog!

Client reviews, commonly referred to as testimonials, are a fundamental part of almost every professional service website. All you have to do is search for your local solicitor or dentist and client reviews will often be plastered all over their site. In the legal market, this has led to the rise of websites such as Solicitor Info (http://www.solicitor.info/). Solicitor Info (2016) states their aim is to balance the freedom of speech of reviewers with the fact that a false review may unfairly damage a solicitor’s reputation, by collecting and displaying reviews and opinions directly from consumers. This presents potential clients with the opportunity to view client reviews on an independent website, where a professional firm does not have monopolistic control of what is published. In this blog I intend to explore the benefit of professional firms obtaining reviews, which have been posted by past clientele, on websites such as Facebook and Google and the benefits it could provide as opposed to business published testimonials.

Source: Digital Word of Mouth and the Power of Client Reviews, Good and Bad, in Professional Services. | Alex N’s Digital Marketing Blog!

Do You Know The Importance of Electronic Word Of Mouth? | kls30’s blog

The Traditional word-of-mouth (WOM), defined as an oral form of interpersonal non-commercial communication among acquaintances (Arndt, 1967), has evolved into a new form of communication; electronic word-of-mouth (eWOM). This refers to any statement made by potential, actual, and former customers about a company’s product and services via the Internet (Hennig-Thurau et.al., 2004). The advances of the Internet offer a strong ground for eWom marketing (Goodman, 2009).

You may think this is new but it’s the oldest type of marketing we know; you come across something new or funny and you share your discovery!

There is an emerging attention on the effectiveness of electronic word of mouth and it is becoming a powerful element in marketing (Godes, 2015). As online communities increase in size, number and character, marketers have come to recognize word of mouth’s growing importance (Meuter, McCabe and Curran, 2013).

via Do You Know The Importance of Electronic Word Of Mouth? | kls30’s blog.

Why do online reviewers choose to leave reviews? | ren’s blog

A modern digital marketing strategy is highly likely to include opportunities for feedback from customers and potential customers, in the form of social media interaction, professional review pages, or review systems on the organisation’s own website.

As far back as 1999, research found that a key characteristic of internet-age consumers is the likelihood of seeking and trusting peer-to-peer recommendations, rather than brand advertising or organisation-elicited information campaigns (Piller, 1999).

Since the explosion of specialist review websites across the service industry such as Trip Advisor or Yelp, it has never been easier for consumers to become self-appointed “reviewers” of a business, or to join the reviewing community that grows around such review websites (Whitehead, 2011).

via Why do online reviewers choose to leave reviews? | ren’s blog.